Dusty Wright's Culture Catch - Smart Pop Culture, Video & Audio podcasts, Written Reviews in the Arts & Entertainment http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/feed en Quote of the Week: Martin Luther King, Jr. http://culturecatch.com/index.php/qotw/martin-luther-king-jr-2 <span>Quote of the Week: Martin Luther King, Jr.</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/webmaster" lang="" about="/index.php/users/webmaster" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Webmaster</a></span> <span>January 20, 2019 - 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/QOTW" hreflang="en">Quote of the Week</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/460" hreflang="en">celebrity quote</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/686" hreflang="en">heroes</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZmtOGXreTOU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>"The time is always right to do what is right."</p> <p>Martin Luther King, Jr. (15 January - 4 April 1968), American Baptist minister and activist who was a leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3502&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="27gr6iv0kpJpbk-PWgkrCyeSlS5o0NokeOFR-B1jopA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 20 Jan 2019 15:00:00 +0000 Webmaster 3502 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/qotw/martin-luther-king-jr-2#comments Feminist Filmmaking Gets Kicked in the Crotch http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3815 <span>Feminist Filmmaking Gets Kicked in the Crotch</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/brandon-judell" lang="" about="/index.php/users/brandon-judell" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brandon Judell</a></span> <span>January 19, 2019 - 13:36</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/film" hreflang="en">Film Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/468" hreflang="en">movies</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/682" hreflang="en">Netflix</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qWKsiHEpiJM?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Get out the blindfold you last used for the <em>Bird Box</em> meme and put on your SONY noise-canceling headphones. Only now will you be ready for one of Netflix's latest offerings, the mind-numbing, cliché-ridden, anti-adrenaline-pumping, female-driven actioner, <em>Close</em>.</p> <p>Just imagine Steven Seagal in drag mouthing dialogue written by a 13-year-old boy who unconsciously enjoys watching women being threatened with rape and getting a good drubbing, and you sort of have this film down pat.</p> <p>This lame excuse for an entertainment, apparently "inspired by the life of the world’s leading female bodyguard, Jacquie Davis," is directed and co-written by Vicky Jewson, who in the past has helmed such critically decimated efforts as <em>Lady Godiva</em> (2008) (3.6 on IMDB; 20% on Rotten Tomatoes' audience rating) and <em>Born of War</em> (2018) (4.3 on IMDB; 35% on RT). I write "critically decimated" possibly unfairly because few critics either saw these films or reviewed them, understandably if you've perused their trailers.</p> <p>Noomi Rapace, who has made a career of being tortured and slugged in <em>The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo</em> and its two sequels, here plays Sam, a much-battered counter-terrorist expert/bodyguard whose last assignment was Middle-Eastern-based. Next, her employers have her become the so-called babysitter of a highly spoiled, newly minted billionaire heiress, Zoe (a not bad Sophie Nélisse), whose dad just died. Her possibly evil stepmother (Indira Varma) had requested a female companion for her charge because Zoe can be quite seductive: "Find someone she can't fuck."</p> <p>Sam and Zoe don't actually warm up to each other in the beginning, but once hired thugs try to kidnap the younger woman, the two gals find they really, really like each other. The former sees the lass as a replacement for someone in her past, and all latter wants is to be loved.</p> <p>Now if my notes are correct, the couple winds up being chased to Morocco, where a nasty chap grinds his foot into Sam's crotch in a hotel room during a prolonged fisticuffs, and Zoe is handcuffed and about to be raped in a van. Somewhere around here or possibly earlier, she calls up her step-mom, who asks: "Zoe, did you really kill that policeman?"</p> <p>My lips are sealed, but this poorly helmed, preposterously scripted, haphazardly edited flick also has poor Rapace often sporting the most unbecoming of hairdos. What are there no gay beauticians in Morocco? Truthfully though, the actress possibly took this part because she’s fearful of starring in roles that might bring her acclaim. As she's noted, "I'm terrified of being too famous. What I'm really afraid of is that the audiences will go into the theater and not be able to forget that it's me, that fame will stand in the way of my acting. I want to keep being able to change into different shapes and different personalities." Noomi, a few more parts like this one, and no one will recognize you. (She, though, is set to portray the emotionally scarred Maria Callas next year so the fame game might not be completely escapable as of yet.)</p> <p>Surprisingly, Close was acquired by WestEnd Films for the company's female audience brand, WeLove, a subsidiary which is geared toward "producing female-specific content and promoting female talent." How oblivious can one be to the #MeToo movement? If Gloria Steinem were dead, she’d be turning in her grave.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3815&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="oAOuPUM2FFWb9uH5Ffwc7dbg_2sXfig0_L6uu2bHzD4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 19 Jan 2019 18:36:43 +0000 Brandon Judell 3815 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3815#comments Steve's Favorite Jazz of 2018 http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3814 <span>Steve&#039;s Favorite Jazz of 2018</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/steveholtje" lang="" about="/index.php/users/steveholtje" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Steve Holtje</a></span> <span>January 17, 2019 - 14:30</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/73" hreflang="en">jazz</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/052G6nMA2WA?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>The first paragraph of a year-end list is traditionally supposed to be a summary pointing at trends. Sorry, I've done too many of those. You want a trend? It's harder every year to make money from music, and five times as hard (at least) to make money from jazz, yet people still keep making great jazz albums. Hooray for them! These were the best of 2018.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>[Notes: (BT) at the end of a review means it's reprinted from <i>The Big Takeover</i>, where I am the jazz editor. Also: It gets harder and harder for me to avoid conflicts of interest when reviewing jazz releases, as each year running the ESP-Disk' label (which I've done since December 2012) finds me dealing with more artists from a business angle. In 2018 ESP-Disk' released albums by Matthew Shipp and Thollem, and William Parker plays on one of them, and those three artists are on this list.]</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>NEW RELEASES</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>1. Dave Holland: <i>Uncharted Territories</i> (Dare2)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>A double album by a half English (bassist Holland, tenor saxophonist Evan Parker) and half American (keyboardist Craig Taborn, drummer Ches Smith) quartet -- though Holland has lived in the U.S. for decades. He and Parker were friends and collaborators in their youth in England, however. Taborn has separately played with Parker and Holland before, and Taborn and Smith have played together in New York. All four have released albums on ECM, but this is not an ECM-style release, often much more aggressive and free than ECM's cool norm. By using not only the quartet formation but also every possible duo and trio combination, and adding electronics (by Taborn) at times, and having Smith play vibes in addition to drums, the group is able to offer a wide variety of timbres and textures, which helps make the two-hours-and-twelve-minutes length bearable in one sitting of concentrated listening. But that could seem like damning with faint praise; better to say that these four masters of improvisation make every track a fresh and new experience. It's worth noting that much of this seems at least partly composed; this is not just four guys getting together and blowing, though some of it could be entirely spontaneous, and that too adds to the variety. But in a way the most interesting aspect here is that, dropping in on the middle of the album with no idea who was playing, one would be hard pressed to recognize the players' sounds even though they are some of the most distinctive players around. They are prioritizing what the music demands in the moment over their own styles. This is one of the most selfless collaborative albums I've ever heard.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>2. William Parker: <i>Flower in a Stained Flass Window/The Blinking of the Ear</i> (Centering)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>Bassist William Parker's monumental three-CD set <i>Voices Fall from the Sky</i>, a mix of previously released material and newly released tracks that all find him working with a wide range of vocalists, has gotten most of the love on year-end lists. This two-CD set, by contrast, no doubt partly because it was released in mid-November and didn't have as much time to make an impression on reviewers, has received relatively little attention, but I prefer it. The first disk is a collaboration with singer Leena Conquest, with whom Parker has worked on several notable projects; it is highly political (which may also have affected its reception) but says things that need to be said at this point in time. The band consists of veterans Dave Sewelson (alto sax) and trombonist Steve Swell plus a number of newer players: pianist Isaiah Parker, tenor saxophoist Abraham Mennen, alto saxist Nick Lyons, and drummer Kesivan Naidoo. The following disc is also, in its titles ("Meditation on Freedom"; "Without Love Everything Will Fail"; etc.) political, but from a more philosophical perspective, and singer AnnMarie Sandy has an entirely different style from Conquest; Sandy's mezzo-soprano voice, with its stentorian projection and big vibrato, sounds more operatic. But the focus on the second disc is more instrumental, with Swell, saxophonist/trumpeter Daniel Carter, pianist Eri Yamamoto, and drummer Leonid Galaganov, getting to stretch out more. The music on both disc, though adventurous as always, is more tonal and composed than what some listeners may expect from Parker, but of course he has always embraced a wide range of styles and, as he has released more albums this decade, that range naturally gets displayed more, and to excellent effect here.</span></span></p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uWI7WHDCJdM?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>3. Marilyn Crispell/Tanya Kalmanovitch/Richard Teitelbaum: <i>Dream Libretto</i> (Leo)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>The booklet includes an excerpt from a Robert Gibbons poem; the last line is "If only silence could climb to a whisper..." Well, here's the embodiment of that (at least, at times), moving far from Crispell's early style. We hear two suites: <i>Memoria/For Pessa Malka</i>, five movements for piano (Crispell), violin (Kalmanovitch), and electronics (Teitelbaum), and <i>The River</i>, seven violin/piano improvisations. <em>Memoria </em>could be composed, and integrates the electronics (including processing of Crispell's piano sound) very smoothly. Is it jazz? Perhaps not, but that's the tradition Crispell comes out of, so here it is. It is absolutely beautiful in a reserved but occasionally unsettling way. <i>The River</i> is purely acoustic, indeed revels in the natural timbres of the instruments, especially the violin's granular sound. Some parts here are busier, less silence (notably "Dark Reflection), but still full of intimacy. This is an absolutely striking release, starkly standing out from everything else I heard in 2018.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>4. Thollem/Clouser/Chase: <i>Dub Narcotic Session vol. II</i> (Personal Archives)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>This trio consists of the prolific Thollem<b> </b>(Fender Rhodes), arguably best known in the jazz world, but also memberof an Italian agit-punk band; guitarist Todd Clouser of A Love Electric, who's also played with John Medeski; and drummer Brian Chase of Yeah Yeah Yeahs, also a presence on the NYC "experimental" scene. What they do here on the first two lengthy (12:47 and 1#:37) tracks sounds like it's probably free improvisation that's expressed through shadowy grooves that suggest mid-'70s Miles Davis minus horns and heads. The longest (14:36) and last track jumps, suite-like, through distinct sections that might have been pre-composed, at least to a degree. Both styles heard here are mentally stimulating and viscerally satisfying. (BT)</span></span></p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/l-rtl8KrkUs?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>5. Andrew Cyrille: <i>Lebroba</i> (ECM)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>This all-star session of the drummer/leader, trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith, and guitarist Bill Frisell is intimate and sui generis. Some tracks might be utterly spontaneous, some might have composed heads, but it's impossible to be sure, and that's a good thing -- these guys are such good listeners that anything is possible; this time they gave us a sparsely textured album, with Smith often using a mute, but it could just have easily been a screaming blowout (don't forget that Frisell used to be in John Zorn's Naked City), though only TGD occasionally hints at that side of these players. Smith gets as many textures out of a trumpet as anybody since the late Bill Dixon, and Frisell seems determined to match him at that, while  Cyrille is, as always, the master of the perfectly placed subtle accent and less-is-more drumming.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>6. Yuko Fujiyama: <i>Night Wave</i> (innova)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>Fujiyama has been on the NYC free jazz scene since the '90s, but has a regrettably slim discography, so this is a welcome release. Joining her after the opening solo track are violinist Jennifer Choi, drummer Susie Ibarra (who played with Fujiyama on the sole album, in 1997, of the One World Ensemble), and cornetist/flugelhornist. Graham Haynes. Haynes, a great player in more structured settings, seems a tad uncomfortable in such a free context, and sounds generically avant-garde here, whereas Choi and Ibarra fit perfectly into Fujiyama's shifting moods while deploying their personal styles. It's still an excellent album, though, its textures and density varying drastically from Zen spareness ("Beyond the Sound") to frenzied action-energy ("Up Tempo"), showing how deserving of more recognition Fujiyama is. (BT)</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>7. Akira Sakata/Simon Nabotov/Takashi Seo/Darren Moore: <i>Not Seeing Is a Flower</i> (Leo)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>After being underrecorded (based on discogs.com) as a leader/co-leader in the '80s (6) and '90s (2), and those mostly on Japanese labels, Japanese saxophonist/clarinetist Sakata had better luck in the '00s (9) and has been stunningly prolific in the '10s (22!). A free player of unceasing inspiration, he was captured here on a short Japanese tour in an international quartet with Japanese bassist Seo, Russian-born/Germany-based pianist Nabatov, and Australian drummer Moore. They masterfully vary textures, sliding from density to space within a blink yet doing so quite organically. Nabatov, a great "inside" player with a number of recordings on Leo, plays with as much unfettered imagination here as I have heard him display, while Seo and Moore are a most stimulating rhythm section. The first five tracks are a continuous improvisation that was their first set on 11/27/17; the boisterous final track is drawn from the second set.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span><span>8. Tim Berne/Matt Mitchell: <i>Angel Dusk</i> (Screwgun)</span></span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Mitchell has been the pianist in Berne's band Snakeoil since 2011. This duo is a different twist on their collaboration. One might expect it to be more intimate, but though that's true a few times here, mostly it's even more intense and dense. This is some 3D-chess-level composition/improvisation where thickly intertwining lines are layered into complex alternate worlds of sound. Or, if that sounds too cosmic, Rubik's Cubes of sound. And for an occasional change of pace, delicate piano harmonies underpin a lovely sax melody, because these guys are nothing if not versatile.</span></span></span></p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YEOdodub7FE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span><span>9. Andreas Varady: <i>The Quest</i> (Resonance)</span></span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Resonance gets lots of well-deserved attention for its reissues of big names from the past. I'm not going to say that's easy, because nothing is easy in the music biz nowadays. But Wes Montgomery and Eric Dolphy have built-in audiences thanks to their status as legends, and garnering accolades for releasing music by legends is easiER than getting attention for young, up-and-coming artists such as Slovakian guitarist Andreas Varady. So kudos to George Klabin and Zev Feldman of Resonance for taking a chance on him. And, really, on his band, because this is a very democratic-sounding group. Of course, Andreas Varady is the frontman for good reason; he's a whiz, compared in the booklet notes to George Benson by executive producer Quincy Jones (I'd say a cross between Montgomery, Metheny, and Frisell). But just as much sonic space is granted to saxophonist Radovan Tariska and pianist Benito Gonzalez, who are also superb, and bassist Bandi Varady (Andreas's father) and powerhouse drummer Adrian Varady (Andreas's 15(!)-year-old brother) excel as well. The harmonic vocabulary is peak '60s, including moments of exploratory daring, but there are rhythmic and production touches that modernize the sound with hip-hop and electronica flavors. And Andreas is a highly talented composer as well; all the tracks here are originals, and compelling ones as well.</span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span><span>10. Various Artists: <i>Winged Serpents: Six Encomiums for Cecil Taylor</i> (Tzadik)</span></span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Cecil Taylor's passing last April at age 89 took from us an icon of avant-jazz piano. It has always been the case that pianists compared to him rarely actually sounded like him. Of course there's early Marilyn Crispell, and arguably Borah Bergman, but other than them (and they retained their own originality and evolved away from Taylor), who really adopted many aspects of his style? He was more a shining exemplar of creating a sound of one's own outside of both the mainstream and academia, and this tribute with one track each by pianists Craig Taborn, Sylvie Courvoisier, Brian Marsella, Kris Davis, Aruan Ortiz, and Anthony Coleman reflects that. There are no Taylor-penned compositions here, and aside from, to an extent, Brian Marsella's burly "Minor Magus," you wouldn't mistake them for Taylor's style-- making this tribute quite apt if you ask me. And I'm thankful to this album for introducing me to rising talent Aruan Ortiz.</span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span><span>11. Salim Washington: <i>Dogon Revisited</i> (Passin' Thru)</span></span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span><span>Purchased on the enthusiastic recommendation of Bruce Gallanter at Downtown Music Gallery. Yes, Julius Hemphill's 1972 classic "Dogon AD" is played, but so is Thelonious Monk's "Four in One." The rest of the program is originals fitting into the territory between those two signposts, with Washington (alto sax, oboe, flute, kalimba) reminding me of Yusef Lateef. Most of the album is a trio, with the superb rhythm section of bassist Hill Greene and star drummer Tyshawn Sorey. Melanie Dyer joins on viola on the boppish "Uh Oh!" and "Dogon AD" and recites Amiri Baraka's lyrics on "New Invasion of Africa."</span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>12. Idris Ackamoor &amp; the Pyramids: <i>An Angel Fell</i> (Strut)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>The comeback of this '70s spiritual jazz outfit continues. At this point it's basically saxophonist Ackamoor and whoever he ropes in; only violinist Sandra Poindexter remains from 2016's acclaimed <i>We Be All Africans</i>. But the mix of mellow Afro-pop grooves, occasional Sun Ra-esque lyrics, and jazzy solos is relatively unchanged and still entrancing. Ackamoor's sax playing is fervid in the Pharoah Sanders style without being outright atonal. The California-based band went to London to record, produced by Heliocentrics drummer Malcolm Catto, who fully grasps this vibe. Though the aesthetic is retro, the references can be contemporary, as on the poignant "Soliloquy for Michael Brown" (the man murdered in cold blood by Ferguson, Missouri police). (BT)</span></span></p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/motDeoTLSm0?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>13. Ivo Perelman/Matthew Shipp: <i>Oneness</i> (Leo)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>These guys record together so much that one thinks they might be overdoing it, especially when this is a three-disc, 142-minute album of duos, with only four of the thirty-three tracks topping six minutes. Yet they have developed such a rapport (naturally, working together so much -- this is their thirtieth album together this decade) that this never wears out its welcome and is continually fresh, exploratory, and unpredictable.</span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>14. Todd Marcus: <i>On These Streets: A Baltimore Story</i> (Sticker Street)</span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Marcus plays bass clarinet -- not as a "double," but as his main axe. Working in a modern straight-ahead jazz style with some top-notch collaborators (guitarist Paul Bollenbeck, pianist George Colligan, vibraphonist Warren Wolf, bassist Kris Funk, drummer Eric Kennedy), Marcus crafts a cool set of excellent compositions full of fetching melodies. But <i>On These Streets: A Baltimore Story</i> is more than just nice music;  the Egyptian-American Marcus (who also runs an anti-poverty non-profit) portrays his neighborhood in Baltimore -- the neighborhood wherein resided the late <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/04/the-mysterious-death-of-freddie-gray/391119/" target="_blank">Freddie Gray</a></span></span><span><span> -- by including spoken-word tracks that explore a variety of Baltimore's cultural and sociopolitical facets.</span></span></span></span></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><strong><span><span>15. Kamasi Washington: <i>Heaven</i> (Young Turks)</span></span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNoSpacing"><span><span>Yes, Washington's 2018 release is titled <i>Heaven and Earth</i> and consists of four slabs of vinyl, the first two under the <i>Earth</i> rubric and the last two dubbed <i>Heaven</i>, altogether sixteen tracks totaling two hours and twenty-four minutes. It wasn't going to make my list because the <i>Earth</i> half is inconsistent and often cheesy. <i>Heaven</i>, though, is everything Washington does well: late '60s/early '70s modal jazz infused with hip-hop rhythms, lush arrangements featuring choir (the debt to Alice Coltrane is unabashed), and plenty of hip solos -- and nothing seems extraneous. Perhaps the symbolism of <i>Earth</i> being flawed and <i>Heaven</i> being perfect is intentional, but even if that's true, it doesn't make me enjoy listening to <i>Earth</i>. <i>Heaven</i>, though, I will be listening to (and deejaying, because its rhythms work for that) for years to come. It's true that one cannot buy a physical release of just the <i>Heaven</i> half, but it can be streamed that way if you choose. And yes, it's arrogant for me to presume to improve upon Washington's plan.</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>HISTORICAL RELEASES</span></span></span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span><span><span>1. David S. Ware Trio: <i>The Balance</i> (AUM Fidelity)</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span>The third and final album of this group with the leader on tenor sax and saxello, William Parker on bass, and Warren Smith on drums consists of the band's three-movement set at the 2010 Vision Festival, plus four outtakes from their 2009 studio session for <i>Onecept</i>. Freely improvised, this is master musicians operating at the highest level of spontaneous creation. Part of the second section of <i>Vision Suite</i> sounds like Ware paying tribute to his mentor Sonny Rollins; the other two sections are Fire Music at its freest; in total, it's forty minutes of nearly continuous soloing, a real <i>tour de force</i>. The studio tracks have more finely detailed sound and shorter, more tautly focused improvisations with Ware also playing saxello, including a great duo section on "Bodhisattva" as Parker bows. The loss of Ware is great, and makes every archival release such as this more precious; thanks to AUM Fidelity for its dedicated service to his memory.</span></span></span></span></p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/q7X2X7LDFok?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong><span><span><span><span>2. John Coltrane: <i>Both Directions at Once: The Lost Album</i> (Impulse!)</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span>This consists entirely of previously unreleased studio Coltrane with his classic quartet in 1963. Do I really need to go into more detail? </span></span></span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span><span><span>3. Eric Dolphy: <i>Musical Prophet: The Expanded 1963 New York Studio Sessions</i> (Resonance)</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span>This is mono versions of the albums <i>Iron Man</i> and <i>Conversations</i> plus an abundance of alternate takes. So, yes, if you've already got those albums, you're thinking, do I really need this? Well, yeah, because there's twice as much stuff here plus, how can you resist mono? And the chance to hear alternate takes with greats Sonny Simmons, Prince Lasha, Clifford Jordan, Woody Shaw, Garvin Bushell, Bobby Hutcherson, Richard Davis (who is especially featured here thanks to two takes each of the duos "Alone Together" and "Muses for Richard Davis"), Eddie Kahn, J.C. Moses, and Charles Moffett? And the packaging is up to Resonance's legendary standards, with extensive interviews with those who played with Dolphy and learned from Dolphy, not least flutist/composer James Newton, to whom Dolphy friend and composer Hale Smith had given these tapes that Dolphy had left with him before going to Europe in 1964, from where, tragically, Dolphy never returned. Now, there is a bit of a catch, which is that the vinyl was released on Record Store Day and sold out, and the CD version doesn't come out until January 25, but hey, that's not so far away. You can already pre-order it. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span><span><span>4. Alan Braufman: <i>Valley of Search</i> (Valley of Search)</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span>I can't quite say this came out of nowhere, because serious jazzheads knew about it and its original label, India Navigation, has cult status, but damn, this is a deep dive into the '70s loft scene. Though, contrary to what some have written, alto saxophonist/flutist Braufman did make more records after this 1975 release -- but under the name Alan Michael. The guy on this album who went on to the most subsequent fame also changed his name, from Gene Ashton to Cooper-Moore; his keyboard work here is fascinating for those familiar with his current work. Bassist Cecil McBee is also jazz-famous; drummer David Lee much less so, though he acquits himself well here. Before you shell out $60 for the latest Kamasi Washington vinyl, pick up this album re-released by the artist and his nephew; it's redolent of the loft vibe that inspires Washington.</span></span></span></span></p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IecX90BouU0?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong><span><span><span><span>5. Charles Mingus: <i>Jazz in Detroit/Strata Concert Gallery/46 Selden</i> (BBE)</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span>A rare configuration of Mingus's band, with tenorman John Stubblefield and pianist Don Pullen the big attractions, captured in 1973. Sound (recorded by WDET public radio) is good, piano's not too out of tune to enjoy Pullen's inimitable playing, Roy Brooks (complete with a turn on musical saw!)  is an surprisingly stimulating alternative to Mingus's longtime drummer Dannie Richmond, and trumpeter Joe Gardner is pretty good if not quite at the level of the other players (but few were!). The repertoire is not entirely classic, which is refreshing, and most of it gets extensive readings. I know vinyl is cool, and lord knows I'm happy to have it that way, but go for the CD box or at least stream it, because there's so much more in those less restricted formats. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><strong><span><span><span><span>6. Wes Montgomery: <em>In Paris: The Definitive ORTF Recording</em> (Resonance)</span></span></span></span></strong></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>Recorded for French state radio on March 27, 1965 at Theatre des Champs-Elysees, this captures the famous guitarist at the peak of his powers with a superb band, joined for 33 minutes by tenor sax great Johnny Griffin, then living in France because jazz was more appreciated there than in the U.S. Resonance has done its usual excellent job in presentation, not only in remastering that makes this clearer than on old bootlegs, but also with booklet notes by multiple observers, including producer Zev Feldman's interviews with Harold Mabern, the pianist whose contributions on the recording make this much more than just a Wes album, and with<b> </b>Russell Malone, who delivers the perspective of a guitarist. (BT)</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p>Here's a sampling of what's available on Spotify:</p> <p><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/223g72srw42hus6l5ygqn3vxq/playlist/6uX9GeHypPRmcQEQb0NRea" width="300"></iframe></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3814&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="0iOmSqOLoMCb1s3B6pD5Si1fSA-ZJk73E8VWgVDFQ-s"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 17 Jan 2019 19:30:17 +0000 Steve Holtje 3814 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3814#comments What Is Real? http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3813 <span>What Is Real?</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/leah-richards" lang="" about="/index.php/users/leah-richards" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Leah Richards</a></span> <span>January 14, 2019 - 11:30</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/theater" hreflang="en">Theater Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/88" hreflang="en">off broadway</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/off-broadway-real.jpg?itok=foC7xz9n" title="off-broadway-real.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo credit: Miguel de Oliveira</figcaption></figure><p><i>Real</i></p> <p>Written by Rodrigo Nogueira</p> <p>Directed by Erin Ortman</p> <p>Presented at The Tank, NYC</p> <p>January 3-20, 2019</p> <p><i>Real</i>, by New York City-based Brazilian writer and director Rodrigo Nogueira, begins by immediately throwing its own title into question, or, rather, by introducing the questions to which its title points. Dominique (Rebecca Gibel) falters as, standing in a spotlight, she delivers an impassioned, poetic monologue, and must step aside to consult a written copy. This moment, which draws attention to the interlacing of artifice and reality unfolding before the audience in this (or any) theatrical experience, is followed, after a wordless interlude set to a fugue, by a comment from Dominique's best friend (Gabriela Garcia) that also asks to be taken as metatheatrical, emphasizing, in connection with the fugue, the layered, musical manner in which <i>Real</i> approaches its concerns.</p> <p>Nogueira's play is filled with unsteady dualities, a litany of repetition with a difference and of disintegrating boundaries. Dominique, we learn, is an award-winning lawyer whose husband (Charlie Pollock) "saved" her from a potential life as a classical musician. She has been inspired to begin playing again by an "old play" concerning Dominic (Darwin del Fabro), a young, queer Latinx composer whose father (Charlie Pollock) considers him diseased and who is living in New York City during the mass deportation in the early 1930s of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans—as Dominique puts it, anyone who looks Mexican. Dominic's life in this play-within-a-play, which is just as real to the audience as Dominique's, intersects in increasingly "real" ways with Dominique's world. The characters in both halves of the narrative echo one another, sometimes in the dialogue itself and helped by the doubling by the actors in parts other than those of the two protagonists, and the more sympathetic among them demonstrate a duality or multiplicity within themselves. Dominic's professor (Keith Reddin) from the conservatory, for instance, calls himself a man both of science and of the arts, and the maid (Gabriela Garcia) who cleans the conservatory was also a doctor before coming to America for a better life for her child; further, she is knowledgeable about music, which, significantly, allows her to understand Dominic's fugue.</p> <p>The Professor defines a fugue as "two different voices built on the same subject" that sound and feel alike while remaining distinct and meeting in "the end of the piece." <i>Real </i>employs the formal, bounded structure of the fugue to think about perception and ambiguity. The husband of Dominique's best friend (Keith Reddin) argues, the notes in the two voices of a fugue eventually become so intertwined that it becomes impossible to distinguish between the original and the imitation, between which is real and which is not; thus, one thing can be two things simultaneously at the same time, not only in music but in the "real" more broadly, in the self, in culture, and in history. Attitudes towards LGBTQIA and Latinx communities, for example, can both have improved in Dominique's time (our present) compared to Dominic's and yet evince a troubling continuity, just as Dominque and Dominic can both be at once themselves and not themselves, and "themselves" itself can simultaneously hold multiple definitions.</p> <p>While the themes may embrace ambiguity, the performances are sharply drawn. Reddin projects low-key intelligence and humor in both of his roles, much as Pollock does confident close-mindedness in his. Garcia strikes a complicated balance in the reflection of her forthright, upstanding maid in the best friend whose composed cattiness wraps itself around a lovelorn loneliness, and vice versa; and Gibel and del Fabro skillfully embody the mix of confusion, pain, self-(re)discovery, and empowerment that marks the arcs of Dominique and Dominic as they bend towards convergence. The impact of these performances is supported by staging choices such as slowly stripping away the furniture from the set in a way that mirrors the protagonists' experiences of their selves and/in their realities.</p> <p><i>Real </i>is dense with symbolism and layering but doesn't belabor its meditations on the stories --  artistic, national, and personal, necessarily real and unreal at the same time -- that shape our lived realities. As the Professor notes, any color appears differently relative to what other color you put next to it. Dominique describes the fugue, which she says became Dominic's life, but which is also <i>Real</i> itself, as beautiful but sad, and who are we to disagree? - <em>Leah Richards</em> &amp; <em>John Ziegler</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3813&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="S4u2H0ah9lZ7uDgldL5sZdf5r6ZArLW8LEldREbCGO8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 14 Jan 2019 16:30:55 +0000 Leah Richards 3813 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3813#comments Video of the Week: "This Land" http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3812 <span>Video of the Week: &quot;This Land&quot;</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>January 10, 2019 - 18:03</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/357" hreflang="en">guitarist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/679" hreflang="en">song of the week</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9KgNaRQ_J-c?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Blues artist/guitarist Gary Clark Jr. is angry and this tune sets things straight. This is a tweak on an original refrain from a chorus from an original protest singer from a bygone era, rewritten from an African-American's vantage. And wait until the epilogue hits you square in the face. This is an extremely moving song and video about racism in American. Epically executed by Gary and his director Savanah Leaf. </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3812&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="iDayz7wPxXedzlLwJGdPdWf9HiHNTR6wZ0EjbG38FOI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 10 Jan 2019 23:03:58 +0000 Dusty Wright 3812 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3812#comments Hesitation Marks http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3811 <span>Hesitation Marks</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/user/529" lang="" about="/index.php/user/529" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Bradley Rubenstein</a></span> <span>January 10, 2019 - 09:16</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/glantzman-reach-1.jpg?itok=SfzVmBmv" width="890" height="829" alt="Thumbnail" title="glantzman-reach-1.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Judy Glantzman: 1979-Today</p> <p>Betty Cunningham Gallery, NYC</p> <p>Through January 13, 2019</p> <blockquote> <p>"What the painter adds to the canvas are the days of his life. The adventure of living, hurtling toward death." Jean-Paul Sartre</p> </blockquote> <blockquote> <p>"I hope that my painting has the impact of giving someone, as it did me, the feeling of his own totality, of his own separateness, of his own individuality." Barnett Newman</p> </blockquote> <p>Abraham Lincoln wrote that "men, like trees, are best measured down." This phrase immediately jumps to mind viewing the current exhibit at Betty Cunningham Gallery, a retrospective of the work of Judy Glantzman. A painter of great sincerity and intelligence, who has been working in New York, creating a personal vocabulary and style for four decades. </p> <p>The reference to trees, of course, was Lincoln’s metaphor: one should reserve judgment on our fellow humans until they are dead, have finished their story. In Glantzman's work, though, trees are also an important medium. Carvings of hands, <em>Reach</em> (2017), grouped in help-me clusters on plinths, are poignantly beseeching, being at once eerily generic, like something found in a reliquary, and at the same time oddly personal, each hand seemingly modeled from life. While bearing a passing resemblance to the sculptures of Nicola Tyson and Georg Baselitz, with their roughhewn carving, Glantzman's sculpture feels far more complex and strange -- Pinocchio adrift on the Raft of The Medusa.<a name="_GoBack" id="_GoBack"></a></p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/glantzman-untitled-1993.jpeg?itok=jS6NgLNP" width="857" height="1160" alt="Thumbnail" title="glantzman-untitled-1993.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>In the '80s, her work addressed AIDS; in her more recent work she paints of loss, conflict, and war. It is now hard to remember, but in the '80s death often came slow, slow and painful, as plagues often do. In our current age death happens quickly, randomly, anonomosly. The bomb in the plaza, the gun in the school yard or at the movie theater. Glantzman's approach in her current work mimics the contingency of the subject. She writes, "I am looking for 'shorthand' symbols that speak of war. The large collages are very physical, so the intuitive process has a lot to do with tearing and layering. Chance plays a big part in the collages. I want the work to 'show me,' so I often glue things together that happened to fall together on the floor."</p> <p>There is something ironic about recent movies having provided a greater glimpse into the work of painters. Julian Schnabel and Willem DeFoe's Van Gogh, and Stanley Tucci and Geoffrey Rush's Giacometti, show the anxious work of the painter trying to connect with a subject. Glantzman follows this tradition, and in <em>Untitled</em> (1993) the scraping, layering, and erasing come together slowly, cohesively, revealing the thought process of the artist. The ballerina dress perhaps a nod to Degas, or maybe a niece, it doesn’t really matter. It is a compelling work, iconic in its simplicity. </p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/glantzman-dark-prayer.jpeg?itok=LjRetSmg" width="1077" height="1160" alt="Thumbnail" title="glantzman-dark-prayer.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Hands reappear in some larger works from 2016. In <em>Dark Prayer</em> (2016) a turvy-topsy array of school portraits, globes, capsized boats, and clasped hands portend both helplessness and hope. Glantzman loses some of the intimacy of her single-figure works when she ups the action on canvas, but what we lose is offset by the cacophony of scratchy notes and sketches, the urgency of a reporter writing on another horror. Glantzman may seem an unlikely documentarian, but perhaps we miss the point if we assume the work is merely political commentary. She says, "I come from a self-portrait orientation… The more I am in it, the truer it is. And the more I am in it, the less it is about me—even though in truth it is all about me." In Glantzman's work the political is personal.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3811&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="XfT-k0_Hqt1DP9cCJD6m9V6CVdQ-m85DrYfOdNpQQbM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 10 Jan 2019 14:16:37 +0000 Bradley Rubenstein 3811 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3811#comments I Lost My Virginity (and More) to Vegetation http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3810 <span>I Lost My Virginity (and More) to Vegetation</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/brandon-judell" lang="" about="/index.php/users/brandon-judell" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brandon Judell</a></span> <span>January 9, 2019 - 20:39</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/film" hreflang="en">Film Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/446" hreflang="en">film</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/218" hreflang="en">cinema</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SRl9EVJ2gRA?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Jean Cocteau meets David Lynch with a good dash of Colette in Bertrand Mandico's sensationally trippy 2018 release, <i>The Wild Boys </i>(<i>Les Garçons Sauvage</i>). Or if you must, just imagine Melville if he'd been a feminist on acid. <i>Billy Budd </i>times five.</p> <p>Yes, here's a tale of a close-knit gang of well-to-do lads, who get carried away enacting a scene from <i>Macbeth</i> for their beloved literature teacher, a Ms. Lorna Debougainville, in a lush field. Wearing unnerving masks and egged on by an evil spiritual force named TREVOR, the teens ravish and ejaculate on their instructor before tying her nude, gagged body onto a horse, which gallops into a chasm, fatally ending Ms. Lorna’s future expounding on the classics.</p> <p>Before you start running for the hills, thinking this is a Lars von Triers offering a la <i>The House That Jack Built</i>, please note that the young men here are all played by young women, but this is not a drag show. If I hadn't been forewarned, you might not have guessed at the masquerade at all. Or you might have just sensed something was a little off. Or on.</p> <p>Well, to sidestep prison sentences for defiling the aforementioned damsel and administering her coup de grace, the boys are handed over to the eerie Captain by their parents. This grizzled ancient mariner, with his huge penis that’s tattooed with islands where he’s made some sexual conquests, promises to rid all of his charges of their antisocial behaviors. However, he can’t promise any will survive the sea journey he’s taking them on. That seems an acceptable risk for the lads’ moms and pops.</p> <p>Once afloat, the boys are roped and chained and forced to do chores that only the fittest of sailors could accomplish with a smile. Their only food is a hairy fruit that the more brazen among us might note seems very vaginal.</p> <p>After days of sadistic treatment and a dog drowning, the ship lands on an unknown island that smells like an oyster and is populated with plants that you can fornicate with. Other flora, when their phallic tubes are snipped, pulse out a delicious nectar. And there’s even one that will cover you with a cocoon-like stickiness that you can only escape by urinating on it, but then … Oh, no! Can it be true? No, please, not that. You might find yourself turning into a female who enjoys the company of other females.</p> <p>For those of you unfamiliar with Charles Ludlam's hilarious 1970's off-Broadway hit, <i>Bluebeard, </i>there's a scene in which the mad scientist, while seeking to create a third, more satisfying sex organ, exclaims, "I will never cease in my experimenting. My dream is to remake Man. A new man with new possibilities for love."</p> <p>In <i>The Wild Boys</i>, the goal is to rid the world of men and their penchant for war and violence one cock at a time through the eating of the aforementioned hairy fruit and the swallowing of other dietary aids. And when one character's groin falls to the ground, he is asked: "What will you do with your dick?"</p> <p>"What should I do with it? Bury it with dignity . . . ."</p> <p>So ends one of the most beautiful celluloid offerings of last year that is only now available on Amazon Prime and Vimeo.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3810&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="W0cXt65h_NeeSh3fLSqhrzFNklff9LqoSsnrqcHAglM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 10 Jan 2019 01:39:11 +0000 Brandon Judell 3810 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3810#comments Poetry In Motion http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3809 <span>Poetry In Motion</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/thalia-vrachopoulos" lang="" about="/index.php/users/thalia-vrachopoulos" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Thalia Vrachopoulos</a></span> <span>January 8, 2019 - 10:13</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/115" hreflang="en">gallery show</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/_yang-soon-yeal-rhapsody-in-red.jpg?itok=OeksJes_" width="1200" height="709" alt="Thumbnail" title="_yang-soon-yeal-rhapsody-in-red.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Yang Soon-yael: <em>Mother</em></p> <p>Elga Wimmer PCC, NYC</p> <p>One of the most refreshing exhibitions to hit Chelsea this season took place at Elga Wimmer PCC. Entitled <em>Mother</em>, the show was created by Korean multi-media artist <a href="https://yangsoonyeal.com" target="_blank">Yang Soon-yael</a> and curated by Soojung Hyun. It consisted of large paintings and groupings of floor sculptures, engaging the viewer not only with colorful appearances, but also with a memorable, movable installation. Delighted audiences participated in the show by arranging the pieces throughout the gallery space. The works' well-balanced construction enabled them to see-saw but not lose their vertical stance as they vacillated back and forth and from side to side. Spaced in groups, the sculptures spread out against the right side gallery wall, adorning its white surface with colorful undulating forms.</p> <p>The seemingly prosaic theme of the show was deceptive. Yang's subjects, made of fully rounded forms but lacking limbs, could be read abstractly as well as figuratively -- and also as a critique of the human figure. According to the artist, they represent the mother figure, invested with a poetic sense of humanity. Their missing extremities can be seen as making them helpless, dependent on others to give them physical completion. This reading would go against feminist ideals; it can be taken as a contemptuous reading of supposedly female frailty. However, at present, we must consider not only the international context of the artist when we try to make sense of their work, we must also consider their national origins. Korea, the nation itself, is seen as the mother of Korean culture and mores by its citizens. She -- the country is thought of as female -- is the core of a personal and national affiliation and belief almost holy by nature.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/yang_soonyeal_mother.jpg?itok=-W4BZRmM" width="823" height="551" alt="Thumbnail" title="yang_soonyeal_mother.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>The mother figure is also up high in the social hierarchy, as indicated by Confucian philosophy, even though in contemporary Korean life women are generally given a low rank on the totem pole. But Yang has traveled widely, and exhibited globally; consequently, she is an independent and accomplished woman. So the traditional reading--that the mother is an ancient and primal influence on creativity -- is not as well supported as the notion that her thematic choices are based on artistic or formal considerations.</p> <p>Yang's education and early career were tied to Oriental painting, with its strong emphasis on brushwork. But even in her early developmental stages, Yang's two- and three-dimensional work featured the mother theme.  Related closely to the "Mother" sculpture series, Yang created the <em>Ottogi (Roly-Poly)</em> series around 2010, while working on an exhibition investigating the first Western account of life in 17<sup>th</sup>-century Korea. For many years the Netherlandish Hamel and his crew languished in Korea without the possibility of returning home; they existed more or less nomadically, being transferred from city to town. In the context of this story, Yang's subjects' origins and their variously shifting orientations (as determined by viewer preference) can also be seen as artistic facsimiles of the wandering Western seafarers neglected in a foreign land.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/yang_painting_.jpg?itok=JOnbyp3A" width="1200" height="1515" alt="Thumbnail" title="yang_painting_.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Yang's monumental, vertically formatted paintings feature gestural movement in their brushwork. The motion alludes to tumultuousness -- both in their directionality and through the event of their bright color. In the midst of this triumphant movement is a white circle that anchors the painting compositionally, giving cohesion and stability to its surrounding vortex-like brush-storm. Further, Yang's way of stretching her canvas is quite unusual in its methodology: she rolls it away from and on top of the wooden stretcher rather than around and under it. This results in a multi-dimensional quality that allows her painting to smoothly develop into a sculptural idiom. Because of the artist's inventive use of form, and, additionally, her reference to historical events, viewing this exhibition has been a highly pleasurable experience. Given the mediocre nature of most offerings in the art world today, the show stood out for its formal achievement as well as, its emotional depth.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3809&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="w-Z0S6cVEJASZF3OtardBvprmelWse3l0jhL_8hHMZc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 08 Jan 2019 15:13:34 +0000 Thalia Vrachopoulos 3809 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3809#comments Augmenting Bowie's Reality http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3808 <span>Augmenting Bowie&#039;s Reality</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/webmaster" lang="" about="/index.php/users/webmaster" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Webmaster</a></span> <span>January 3, 2019 - 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/380" hreflang="en">AR</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/381" hreflang="en">VR</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/474" hreflang="en">Bowie</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/bowie-as-is-app.jpg?itok=2CaJqPzK" width="1000" height="1285" alt="Thumbnail" title="bowie-as-is-app.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Even in death, Bowie continues to embrace the future.</p> <blockquote> <p>"<strong><em>This brings the amazing </em>David Bowie is<em> exhibition to a wider audience. It's great that his fans get to experience it. It was a privilege to be involved.</em></strong>" - <strong>Gary Oldman</strong></p> </blockquote> <p>The <em>David Bowie is</em> AR (augmented reality)/VR (virtual reality) mobile app is the first release resulting from a collaboration between the David Bowie Archive and Sony Music Entertainment (Japan) Inc., who hosted the exhibition in Tokyo in 2017. The New York-based studio Planeta is designing and developing the AR/VR interpretations of the original museum experience at the V&amp;A. The AR adaptation mirrors the physical exhibition through a sequence of audio-visual spaces through which the works and artifacts of Bowie's life can be explored. 3D renderings preserve and present his costumes and treasured objects such as musical scores, storyboards, handwritten lyrics, and even diary entries--all in 360-degree detail, enabling intimate "behind the glass" access rivalling that of the visitors to the original exhibit, and enhanced by an immersive audio experience featuring Bowie’s music and narration, best experienced with headphones.</p> <p><em>David Bowie is </em>record-breaking exhibition drew over 2 million visitors across 12 cities -- the most visited touring exhibition in the history of the V&amp;A -- and has been granted digital immortality. <em>David Bowie is</em>, curated by Victoria Broackes and Geoffrey Marsh, set the standard for others to follow. The visual richness of this show and visionary nature of Bowie and his music made this a must for AR/VR reality.</p> <p>Award-winning actor Gary Oldman provided the narration for this new mobile app. (Check him out as a priest in the audacious Bowie video for the single "<a href="https://youtu.be/7wL9NUZRZ4I" target="_blank">The Next Day</a>." He and David were close friends.) </p> <p>The app which debuts on Jan. 8th -- which would have been David's 72nd birthday -- will cost $7.99. More info here: <a href="https://nastylittleman.us5.list-manage.com/track/click?u=13daec772857eef90d4e2c19a&amp;id=ff0ba6ef71&amp;e=f553d89571" target="_blank">https://davidbowieisreal.com/</a></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3808&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="d9ssolGrE4HFHIFdaAqqPOYTVxwH6xVX7t_tjIDKp1w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 03 Jan 2019 15:00:00 +0000 Webmaster 3808 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3808#comments Dusty's Favorite Culture from 2018 http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3801 <span>Dusty&#039;s Favorite Culture from 2018</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>December 29, 2018 - 00:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/curios" hreflang="en">Curios</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/486" hreflang="en">Favorite Music</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/647" hreflang="en">favorite films</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-01/wide-awake-art.png?itok=M5npXkX8" width="1200" height="1200" alt="Thumbnail" title="wide-awake-art.png" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Here is my list of top-notch, dare I say, epic culture from 2018. Certainly in these digitally-enhanced days, it can be overwhelming to check out everything. I suspect I'll continue to discover more, as I read some of my peers' favorites. In any event, hope you have the time to check out some of my choices.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TTf0Lc5YAcc?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><em>A Private War (</em>Aviron Pictures)</p> <p>A movie that will put war into perspective in a more than obvious way, the way that war correspondents do so every time they step onto the battlefield; telling the truth can be perilous to their lives. Sadly, giving voice to the voiceless will always be dangerous politics.Look for Rosalind Pike to get an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of the most celebrated war correspondent of our time, Marie Colvin. Ditto for the director Matthew Heineman and the movie itself. </p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ULUo0048xZE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><em>Capernaum </em>(Sony Pictures Classics)</p> <p>This film shatters  humanity's inhuman way of handling our fellow humans with little to offer them in ways of support or empathy. Winner of the coveted Palm D'Or at Cannes, not hard to see why. Director Nadine Labaki's <em>Capernaum</em> ("Chaos") tells the story of Zain (Zain al Rafeea), a Lebanese boy who sues his parents for the "crime" of giving him life. It was made with a cast of non-professionals playing characters whose lives closely parallel their own. This emotionally-charged film will leave its mark on you for life.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/76bH1b9XreE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><em>The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel </em>Season 2 (Amazon Studios) </p> <p>This is the best on-line/TV/episodic show of the past decade. Kudos Amazon Studios. Caveat alert! No, I've not seen The <em>Handmaid's Tale</em> yet. And I loved season two of Showtime's stand-up comedy period piece circa early 1970s <em>I'm Dying Up Here</em>. (Sadly executive producer Jim Carey's show got cancelled.) Season 2 of <em>Mrs. Maisel</em> may not pack the wallop of Season 1, but it's the devil in the details that had me binge view the new season. There is more focus on her Jewish family at home, in Paris, in the Catskills for the summer, her disastrous comedy road tour, et al. As a former TV agent that worked with comedians, I know a few things about the lives of comedians. The sophomore season focuses on Rachel Brosnahan's<strong> </strong>Miriam "Midge" Maisel trying to navigate her slow ascension into the world of showbiz while juggling the <em>mishegoss of her </em>upper-crust Jewish family on the Upper West Side of NYC. (I live on the Upper West Side and little has changed in the social fabric of our neighborhood.) Midge has to deal with all of it -- her Paris-based mother Rose (Marin Hinkle), her Columbia professor father Abe (Tony Shalhoub), her soon-t0-be-ex-husband (?) Joel (Michael Zegen), her foul-mouthed and badass manager Susie (Alex Borstein), her CIA-employed brother Noah (Will Brill) and neurotic sister-in-law Astrid (Justine Lupe), "in-your-face" father-in-law Moishe (Kevin Pollack), and even Lenny Bruce (the extraordinary Luke Kirby). I hope the producers and writers can pump up Season 3. Expect more Emmy nominations/awards for this show in 2019.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/hannah-arendt.jpg?itok=uYxM_i7C" width="1199" height="901" alt="Thumbnail" title="hannah arendt" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><em>The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth</em> (Bloomsbury Publishing)</p> <p>Author/<em>New Yorker</em> cartoonist/CC contributor Ken Krimstein has released one of the finest graphic novels of our generation. Before you thumb your nose at the thought of "reading" a graphic novel one would be well-served to buy this novel and ingest it for yourself. Don't believe me? Cartoonist Roz Chast had this to say: "Ken Krimstein's deeply moving graphic memoir about the life and thoughts of philosopher Hannah Arendt is not only about Hannah Arendt. It's also, through her words, about how to live in the world..."</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aJoWH736PnE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><em>Slave Play</em> Off-Broadway Play</p> <p>A riveting and complex portrayal of race, gender, and mental health in America presented by the <a href="https://www.nytw.org/" target="_blank">New York Theater Workshop</a>. Playwright Jeremy O. Harris rips apart history to shed new light on being black in the 21st century. Directed by Obie Award winner Robert O'Hara, it has already won the Rosa Parks Playwriting Award, the Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award, The Lotos Foundation Prize in the Arts and Sciences and the 2018 Paula Vogel Award. Look for it to move to a larger New York theater in the new year.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jOBjwkaW-T0?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>The Kinks - <em>Preservation Green Society Box Set</em> (Warner)</p> <p>Some have suggested that this is <em>the</em> quintessential Kinks album and one of <em>the</em> quintessential rock albums about English society circa mid-196os. This box set has the vinyl in stereo, mono, German pressings; CDs with bonus tracks including the one above. A treasure-trove and a must-own collection for any music fan!</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-11/stay-awake-album.jpg?itok=CMTbfiOa" width="1016" height="1002" alt="Thumbnail" title="stay-awake-album.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><em>Stay</em> <em>Awake</em>: <em>Music</em> <em>from Vintage</em> <em>Disney</em> <em>Films</em> (A&amp;M/UMe)</p> <p>I admit a very soft spot for the early Disney films, and a massive disdain for rote covers of classic songs. Thankfully producer Hal Willner does as well. This is one of my favorite “cover” albums ever produced. So many amazing versions of amazing songs from amazing Disney movies. Check out my full review <a href="http://culturecatch.com/node/3796" target="_blank">here</a>. </p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-Jy6P9TltXQ?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>The Band - <em>Music from Big Pink (</em>Universal Music Group<strong>)</strong></p> <p>Much has been written about the legacy of The Band, architects and purveyors of the entire Americana movement, all of it deserving. One only needs to start with their genre-defining debut, one of the finest debut's by any band from the 1960s. Here it gets the royal vinyl treatment -- remixed and re-released as a double album, 180 gram, 45 RPM. Listen to the digital version of one of the greatest "American" songs ever written. Not bad for 4 Canadians and one badass drummer/vocalist from Arkansas.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/u4yA8zM0ifY?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Loma <em>Loma</em> (SubPop)</p> <p>From Shearwater vocalist Jonathan Meiburg, ethereal vocalist Emily Cross, and multi-instrumentalist/engineer Dan Duszynski comes this ethereal juggernaut. Sonically rich even ambient at times, but complex enough to require multiple listens to fully appreciate the magic created by this trio. Check out the video for "Black Widow" above.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NewN2Mw2b78?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>The War and Treaty <em>Healing Tide</em> (Thirty Tigers)</p> <p>Won't find any false pretenses in this release. Gospel, funk, rock, soul... a heady stew of timeless music that will sanctify even the coldest heart!</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VODKZxsRa_E?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>IDLES - <em>Joy as an Act of Resistance</em> (Partisan Records)</p> <p>Punk-rock fury from the UK. Visceral and in-your-face anger. Like PIL, like The Fall, like Gang of Four, like... shit, "anger is an energy." Just ask Mr. Lydon. Or the IDLES' lead singer. "I'm like Stone Cold Steve Austin, I put homophobes in coffins."</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bYOqO-zJzho?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Shame - <em>Songs of Praise </em>(Dead Oceans)</p> <p>The debut studio album by yet another British post-punk band Shame might have been released in January 2018, but it didn't find it's way to me until August. This London-based quintet has a killer guitar sound throughout and shares the same artistic aesthetics as Wire, The Fall, even Oasis on the fantastic ballad "Angie." For me, the best of the ten tracks is the Iggy Pop-like rocker "Gold Hole" (see video above). Nary a weak track, top to bottom. I picked it up on vinyl.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vi6MCL-2HzQ?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Charles Lloyd &amp; The Marvels + Lucinda Williams <em>Vanished Gardens</em> (Blue Note/UMG)</p> <p>I saw them live at Jazz at Lincoln Center just last week. Charles Lloyd was revelatory, even at the young age of 80! And Lucinda held her own with these masters of jazz, even inspiring them. Their take on Dylan's "Masters of War" needs to be required listening.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0pv7rN-_IWU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Natalie Prass - <em>The Future &amp; The Past</em> (ATO)</p> <p>Funky white girl lets some funky 1970s pop seep into the proceedings as well as a little help from her friend -- singer-songwriter, producer, arranger, and founder of Spacebomb Records Mr. Matthew E. White -- and results are smooth as silk. 12 undeniable songs, perfect for any road trip, holiday or otherwise.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eZXS8Jpkiac?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Parquet Courts - <em>Wide Awake!</em> (Rough Trade)</p> <p>NYC's punk/alt/indie quartet made one of the best album's of 2018. Think Talking Heads meets The Clash and that's only a small influence-peddling comparison as the funky James Brown video above will prove. Released in May, the video above is from their sixth album and -- IMHO -- their most diverse, musically speaking, and best.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Zjs-ktomv4E?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>David Bowie - <em>New Let Me Down (2018)</em> (UMG)</p> <p>This version of Bowie's critically-spurred 17th album from <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Bowie" title="David Bowie">David Bowie</a> <em>Loving The Alien</em> (1983-1988) box set was originally released in April 1987 takes his original vocals, strips away the insipid '80's production value and adds "a brand new production" with new instrumentation overseen by producer/engineer <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mario_J._McNulty" title="Mario J. McNulty">Mario J. McNulty</a>. Bowie himself was never pleased with the "studio sessions" vibe of the album and started Tin Machine band with guitarist Reeves Grabel soon after.  This "reinvented" version is extraordinary as it includes elements of the original tracks along with new recorded tracks by some of the artists who worked with Bowie during his lifetime. A stand-alone new vinyl version will be released in February 2019. </p> <p>For more of my favorite music from 2018, check out my <a href="https://open.spotify.com/user/puffdusty/playlist/5Ku1x0C0nevIwS5nejTZwy?si=5dIVE0dxSbKOlBQMbc5Zqw" target="_blank">Spotify</a> playlist. It's much more extensive.</p> <p><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/puffdusty/playlist/5Ku1x0C0nevIwS5nejTZwy" width="300"></iframe></p> <p>What was on your radar for 2018?</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3801&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="ww0MDHBCEfCZuRyBJ7lIyMVAwTqeX8ZjKy7CVkmEGgc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 29 Dec 2018 05:02:00 +0000 Dusty Wright 3801 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3801#comments