Art Review http://culturecatch.com/index.php/art en Steve Keene Thaws Frieze! http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3842 <span>Steve Keene Thaws Frieze!</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>May 5, 2019 - 13:48</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1200" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-05/steve-keene-frieze.jpeg?itok=VtvT54MP" title="steve-keene-frieze.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo credit: d.Bindi</figcaption></figure><p>The Frieze New York 2019 art fair, which ran through Sunday, May 5th, offered over 190 galleries, hailing from over 25 countries. Impractical, from a casual buyer's stand point, as it can be overwhelming (Stendhal syndrome)<b> </b>but always fun for amazing people watching as New Yorkers love to wear their individualism as proudly as any artist's painting on a gallery wall, and despite what some may think, not at all as stuffy as some art gallery shows can be. I always find at least a dozen new artists that I'd proudly display on my apartment's walls,<em> if</em> I had the dollars <em>and</em> the space to do so. But things were different this year. I could actually afford a piece.</p> <p><a href="https://www.artsy.net/p-p-o-w" target="_blank">P.P.O.W</a>.'s booth presented countless paintings by <a color="black" href="https://www.artsy.net/artist/steve-keene" target="_blank">Steve Keene</a> -- priced between $10, $20 and $50 (depending on the size) -- were the art fair's best deal, even cheaper than some of the food/beverage vendors serving up very edible meals, snacks, and libations. With Keene live-painting like a madman across a giant easel set about 3-4 feet above the art crowd masses, he'd set up about 10-12 plywood boards in front of him and would paint them simultaneously. From simple, colorful images of animals (cats), people (Buchanan above), and many cool album covers by musicians like David Bowie, Depeche Mode, The Clash, Bow Wow Wow, Siouxsie and the Banshees, et al., there was always a crowd ready to jump on one of his pieces as soon as it was finished and hung on the wall opposite of him. There was a "cash-only" wooden box to collect the dollars from willing patrons.</p> <p>Keen's work has a simple, but inviting illustrative quality, like hip DIY gig posters from the punk rock/new wave era, something you might have found taped to a lamppost or hung in a boutique. As I watched the artist in action, a middle-aged woman next to me was debating which "album cover" recreation her son would enjoy most -- The Clash's <em>London Calling</em> or <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_of_the_Mohicans_(EP)" target="_blank">Bow Wow Wow's <em>Last of the Mohican</em></a> homage to Edouard Manet's <em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:%C3%89douard_Manet_-_Le_D%C3%A9jeuner_sur_l%27herbe.jpg" target="_blank">Le déjeuner sur l’herbe</a></em> piece. (I suggested the Bow Wow Wow, given that album's original controversy. Or buy both for only $40.) She only had to wait an hour until the paint had dried and the paintings were "hung" on the wall behind her. I didn't wait for her final selection(s) as I decided to walk the fair and come back later to make my $20 selection. (See above.)</p> <p>What an art collector's metaphor, eh? The low price-point meant that any attendee could walk out of the Frieze with a real piece of art by a real life artist. And what a great story to share, too.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3842&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="YkrMWJ6T-KVvZ-56i0vDtWLp3wApXPC1V4gka-rZhvk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 05 May 2019 17:48:12 +0000 Dusty Wright 3842 at http://culturecatch.com Build The Wall! http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3827 <span>Build The Wall!</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>March 1, 2019 - 10:32</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/510" hreflang="en">painters</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>Popaganda artist <a href="https://vimeo.com/312798557" target="_blank" title="Build The Wall">Ron English</a> is building a Welcome Wall on the US/Mexico border!</p> <p>As a street artist Ron has used walls to tell his story. Often the subject of his work is to make people aware of classism, racism, corporatism, and politics. And now he is building what he calls <em>The Welcome Wall</em>.</p> <p>"A wall is the perfect physical and metaphoric gift from a cult leader to his followers. It positions him as the great protector of his chosen people from the unwashed, unenlightened others!" - Ron English</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-vimeo video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/312798557?autoplay=0"></iframe> </div> <p>CONCEPT<br /> The Mexican American Welcome Wall will be a 2000 ft long physical wall along the US/Mexico border, designed by artists and activists to be a conceptual message board for an ongoing discussion about the wall, border, wildlife, and immigration issues. A temporary art installation to fuel the resistance against Trump's racist monument.</p> <p>TIME FRAME<br /> Ron will start building this spring and the wall will stay up till 2020 Election night. On Election night he will auction the different sections.  Part of the proceeds will go to wild life charities, indigenous communities, and non-profits.</p> <p>DESIGN <br /> The wall is designed to be built in plywood sections of 8' wide by 12' tall. Exactly three sheets of plywood  stacked on top of each other. The design was made so that Art can be created off site and easily shipped by means of a flatbed truc. Of course we encourage the artists to come to the site and make the art locally.</p> <p><a href="https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/ron-english-welcome-wall#/" target="_blank" title="Build The Wall!">Donate to his very modest IndieGoGo campaign today!</a></p> <p>(Images courtesy of Ron English.)</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3827&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="wZHWopiKLuDI2oTJmhlVpb8DdhqPcd72Ar7u-bQAquc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 01 Mar 2019 15:32:32 +0000 Dusty Wright 3827 at http://culturecatch.com Fire From On High http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3824 <span>Fire From On High</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/user/6559" lang="" about="/index.php/user/6559" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Fran Bull</a></span> <span>February 24, 2019 - 12:46</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-05/3._tony_moore_fire_painting_14.11.18_2018_15x22.5x2.5in_wood-fired_ceramic_glass_stone_inclusions.jpeg?itok=5hq_ILdx" title="3._tony_moore_fire_painting_14.11.18_2018_15x22.5x2.5in_wood-fired_ceramic_glass_stone_inclusions.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Tony Moore Fire Painting 14.11.18 2018, 15x22.5x2.5in, wood-fired ceramic, glass, stone inclusions.</figcaption></figure><p>Tony Moore: <em>Transit</em>. Sculpture &amp; Fire Painting</p> <p><a href="http://www.thepaintingcenter.org" target="_blank">The Painting Center</a>, NYC</p> <p>January 29<sup>th</sup> – February 23<sup>rd</sup>, 2019</p> <p>We have admired the kiln magic wrought by such modern-day clay artists as Josep Llorens Artigas (note his own austere vessels along with the outsized, craggy pieces made in collaboration with Joan Mirò).  We've loved the brut, wabi-sabi influenced, almost-pots of Peter Voulkos, and the monumental, brightly glazed standing figures of Viola Frey.  Now comes along Tony Moore who joins this rarefied company with an exhibition of splendid, anagama-noborigama fired ceramic works at The Painting Center, New York.</p> <p>With two bodies of work on view, Moore offers the same breadth of imagination and expansive vision that have characterized his art practice over the years.  Decades ago Moore, Yale-trained as a sculptor, shifted away from a period of self-assigned apprenticeship in the process of making vessels of clay.  While his large vases and pots were themselves unique, he returned to his true path of using clay as an expressive fine art medium.  In this current show, we are the benefactors of Moore having married virtuosic craft with an artist’s probing sensibility.</p> <p>Upon entering The Painting Center Gallery, two commanding sculptures mounted upon stands of rusted steel, greet the viewer.  Massive, hermetic, bearers of undeniable visual authority, each possesses an impenetrable density and weight.  Shakespeare best asks the question that arises: <i>what is your substance, whereof are you made?</i> (Sonnet 53)</p> <p>One of the pair, entitled <i>The Injustice of Silence</i>, is a cascading, gyrating tower of dazzling surface complexity.  Moving around its girth, each view reveals a radically altered facet of its overall anatomy, like the proverbial elephant’s, requiring the viewer to remember, in order to construct an image of the whole.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-05/2a._tony_moore_injustice_of_silence_2017_63x25x25in_wood-fired_ceramic_porcelain_glass_steel.jpeg?itok=JivfJY3L" title="2a._tony_moore_injustice_of_silence_2017_63x25x25in_wood-fired_ceramic_porcelain_glass_steel.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Tony Moore, Injustice of Silence 2017, 63x25x25in, wood-fired ceramic, porcelain, glass, steel</figcaption></figure><p>Surface colorations transition from rich yellow-browns and umbers, to charcoal grays and blacks.  We wonder: Has some unseen force been brought to bear upon this mass?  Are we being shown a thing in the process of decay, beautiful in its undoing, redolent of things of the earth, of mud, of blackened soil?  Regarding the ganged and sliding cubic shapes so alien to this otherwise biomorphic body, our thoughts turn to man-made things, to architecture or to children’s toy blocks.  There is something apocalyptic and chaotic -- a colliding of the natural and the constructed.</p> <p>The second work, <i>Voice</i>, began its kiln journey as one solid mass.  It developed a central crack in drying -- a kiln glitch gone right, a beneficial accident.  Its surfaces, gorgeously raked and striated as if Nature were the sculptor, evoke a sense of geological process. Imagine rock formed over eons by earthquakes, by water and extremes of temperature. Peering into the crevasse of this two-fold piece, into the tear itself, we strain to see its full contour, catching but a glimpse of two interior chambers, one on each side.  We wonder what they might hold. A sleeping bear? An entombed Pharaoh?  The bifurcated womb of Mother Earth, herself?</p> <p>The second body of work, Moore's <i>Fire Paintings</i>, sing out from the gallery walls.  These gleaming chunky rectangular clay slabs are hybrid forms.  They have the weight, bulk and dimensionality of sculpture while functioning like painting, as frontally viewed wall-hung works.  In their making, Moore added glass and impressed plant matter into the clay, along with a series of luminous glazes.  Kiln fire and time transform these "burnt offerings," melting, fusing and pooling pigments and melted glass to create beautiful surfaces and imagery that is both abstract and figurative, often at once.  Gaining knowledge of materials and their performance "under fire," Moore's studio experiments evolved to become less random and more directed over time.</p> <p>Many of these <i>Fire Paintings</i> have a grid motif, a web work of geometrically ordered squares tinted a seductive, jewel-like Mediterranean blue.  Moore explains he was inspired to find a way technically to work out the effect of multiple shining windows after seeing sun glinting off the glass of New York City skyscrapers.  This viewer can testify that his search was successful.</p> <p>In the passage quoted below, Moore shares, quite rhapsodically, his reaction to the results of the collaboration between himself and the unseen "fire painter," the <i>god</i> in the kiln:</p> <blockquote> <p>"The figures, made from cut and impressed twigs, perfectly dovetailed into my pre-existent vocabulary.  As I investigated, the figures kept running, fleeing, tumbling, searching, moving away from and towards something else.  They moved across landscapes, towards glowing buildings/edifices, systemized structures/societies, which both beckoned them and somehow dominated them.   The figures were present, yet also in spirit form, floating and dissolving in diaphanous light and shimmering waters.  Twigs became, fathers, mothers and children.  They became surrogates, rather like a small child’s dolls, playing out a deeply psychological fiction of desperately moving toward 'something'.  Something hopeful, yet presently out of reach.  Something eternally becoming..." Tony Moore 2019</p> </blockquote> <p>Moore's art invokes a confrontation with the raw, natural elements themselves. Daringly executed, inventive and unabashedly beautiful, we are taken into ancillary realms.  Art and archaeology align, the fossils of paleontology put in an appearance and twigs become running figures surrounded in light.</p> <p>We may also take a lesson from Moore in these fraught times.  In Tony Moore we find all the qualities expected of extraordinary artists -- talent, technical ability, brilliant innovative ideas and communicative power.  We find in Moore as well, and in his art, an affirmation of fundamental values -- exigency, dedication, integrity, and something perhaps ineffable, the transcendent ability to infuse “soul” into matter, to summon pure beauty in the service of profound truth.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3824&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="i57jlR9uHjJWRWns1aEf6TMJrL9u2HNreYIwJbf7qgM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 24 Feb 2019 17:46:10 +0000 Fran Bull 3824 at http://culturecatch.com Exploring The World of Francine Tint http://culturecatch.com/index.php/art/francine-tint-explorations <span>Exploring The World of Francine Tint</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/maryhrbacek" lang="" about="/index.php/users/maryhrbacek" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Hrbacek</a></span> <span>March 13, 2018 - 09:09</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div> <figure class="image"><img alt="" height="439" src="/sites/default/files/images/francine-tint-painting1_0.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 378px;" width="650" /><figcaption>Flight, 2017 acrylic on canvas, 53 x 72 in.</figcaption></figure></div> <div><em>Explorations</em>: Francine Tint</div> <div>Cavalier Gallery, NYC</div> <div>2/28 - 3/24, 2018</div> <p>Cavalier Gallery presents <em>Explorations</em>, a series of large-scale acrylic on canvas paintings by Francine Tint. This exhibition provides an opportunity to take notice and ask, what attributes separate the masterful from the mundane, in a city that has placed gestural abstraction on the international art map. It comes as no surprise that the artists’ temperament plays a crucial role. Francine Tint is an artist who transcends skillful manipulation of materials to disclose the reality beneath the surface of everyday things. She imbues the works with her inner being by painting at the height of her emotions, to create a revealing catalogue of impulses and feelings that connect the canvases to enduring works of authentic artists through time.</p> <!--break--> <p>Tint's character, her power, and ability to transfer various modulated states of being to her art, generate compelling energy via a panoply of techniques that fuse intention with intuition, seizing viewer attention with startling force. What is also surprising is the aura of air and light that radiates forth with luminosity from the unexpected juxtapositions of rich hues that are applied with big brushes, for the most part on large formats.</p> <p>Tint's art combines generosity of scale with a sense of dramatic tension that captivates more than the eye. These immersive works do not leave the observer alone in a comfort zone. They engage the viewer with passion because Tint is not "going through the motions" or biding time. Her art and life are inextricably combined; they are one in the reality they inhabit, as the expression of a dynamic, assertive personality. Tint's paintings are not repetitious; they are not timid, they lead the viewer through the picture format with the vehicle of broad, articulated motions and fine points of brushed on or scraped away departures.</p> <p>The works are inspired by nature’s palette at dusk, by the sky in its limitless variations and eloquent nuances. Mood and ambiance play a narrative role in the depth and poetry of the layered works that succeed in creating a sense of air and space, even volume, through the placement of forms and carefully chosen dominant and recessive color combinations. The pictures are alive with personal unconventional color contrasts, such as gold and lavender, and with the interaction of warm expanding hues of orange, yellow and red , opposed to cool enigmatic shades of signature lavender and black. Tint's primary colors are intersected with startling sweeps of strokes that evoke the effects of cymbals sounding or high winds whistling.</p> <p>The jazz that resounds in Tint's studio comes into her consciousness, exposing her responsive interior life as she finesses tempestuous, optimistic works, portraits of Tint’s response to music and the unobstructed sky vistas that provide daily sustenance for discovery and wonder. A fluctuating, panoramic sky provides inspiration and a sense of exultation that seldom springs from views of man-made structures and buildings. Tint employs various materials, but the use of matte medium may diminish the immediacy of the surfaces. Her broad circular strokes coincide with short horizontal touches that ease the vehemence with counter-movements and alternative directions. Tint's painterly intelligence plays out in the complexities of various shapes and sizes, large and small, thick and thin, in paint that is fat and lean, yielding a measure of illumination for the observant viewer.</p> <p>Tint worked for many years as a costume designer in film and television, with luminaries such as David Bowie and Ridley Scott, to name but a few. Her intense feeling for and use of color indicate she absorbed the "push-pull" legacy of the artist and teacher Hans Hoffman. In some of the smaller pieces, she makes textural surfaces with colorful impasto that form a virtual sculptural relief in a freshly shaped terrain. This untamed eloquence is above all an intuitive process, in every way a challenge to geometric, hard-edged minimal abstraction. The two forms occupy entirely different poles on the spectrum of abstract art as it is practiced today. Every day Tint finds new freedom and vibrancy to express her instincts as a painter making emotionally charged, strongly affecting articulate works.</p> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 13 Mar 2018 13:09:41 +0000 Mary Hrbacek 3681 at http://culturecatch.com Little Q & A: Mary Hrbacek + Bradley Rubenstein http://culturecatch.com/index.php/art/little-q-a-mary-hrbacek <span>Little Q &amp; A: Mary Hrbacek + Bradley Rubenstein </span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/user/529" lang="" about="/index.php/user/529" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Bradley Rubenstein</a></span> <span>November 7, 2017 - 04:57</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><img alt="" height="584" src="/sites/default/files/images/hrbacek_queen-connected_16.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 584px;" width="560" /></p> <p>Mary Hrbacek is an artist and an art critic (AICA) based in NYC. In 2016 she received the Carole A. Feuerman Sculpture Foundation, ESKFF Foundation, The Helis Foundation, Financial Grant for her art on view at Mana Contemporary. Her drawings in "Whispers" have been included in the collection of The Museum of Contemporary Art of Crete.</p> <p><strong>Bradley Rubenstein: </strong>These are quite lovely; I did see one of your shows a year or two back at CREON, they had a remarkable clarity, and reminded me of Georgia OKeefe's work -- there is a very large O'Keefe in the Art Institute of Chicago, a sky, with strange biomorphic clouds. It is a strange painting, and growing up in Chicago, held my attention for years. I don’t want to get to far ahead of myself here, so let’s start with a little background…</p> <!--break--> <p><strong>Mary Hrbacek:</strong> My appreciation of the environment began while I was living for five years as a girl near Stockholm, Sweden, in a Scandinavian culture that venerates the natural world. When we returned to the States my dad purchased a rundown house in northern Vermont near Canada, to be our family’s "stuga," a getaway refuge where all Swedes retreat from the city during the summer. First I became fascinated by the peeling bark of the many birch trees on the property, then I noticed the life force that emanates from the human-like "eyes" and gestures of the waving branches. Later when I traveled with my husband we discovered 400-year-old sycamore trees in Viareggio, Italy with distinctly human characteristics and gestures. I became inspired by the mythology of Virgil's "Metamorphoses," with its tales of morphing human and natural forms.</p> <p><strong>BR: </strong>I like what you described about your working process. You create the charcoal that you use to make the drawings… it is an actual tree drawing a tree. It reminds me of Susan Rothenberg's early horse paintings: she used glue paint, a horsehair brush, and traced shadows of horses…all those horses but no horse… just an image of a horse. There was a bit of Jasper Johns in that thinking. Is that similar to how you see what you are doing? The process being a part of the picture?</p> <p><strong>MH:</strong> I actually buy commercial charcoal, but it does derive from tree bark, which makes the charcoal drawing of a tree, a "’tree’ made from a tree." The process is certainly a part of the final picture, as it plays a prime role in the deep dark "feeling" and textural surface that I create with layers of charcoal, which I later extract with a cloth to slightly vary the surface. I use line to carve in to hone the forms exactly.</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> The paintings feel different to me, I mean, they are similar as images, but I see more action going on in them. You are catching the trees morphing into something else. Rudolph Arnheim talks about the difference between "seeing into" and "seeing as." You seem to be doing two things at the same time, choosing the tree because it suggests something, "seeing into", then transcribing it, just painting the part of the tree that you want in this new form "seeing as". Or Leonardo looking at clouds and discovering "characters" in them.</p> <p><strong>MH:</strong> I find your analysis very succinct. I think what you say about the artist putting things into a work that others may not see or appreciate, such as references, metaphors and symbols, is a result of the artist’s emphasis or vision. My vision is not very realistic; it is intuitive. I also have a problem with visual reception that affects my ability to see and to read, which may distort how I perceive my motifs. The thing is, one person may not get them all, but just about all of them, even the ones I don't intend, are noticed by someone. That's why two people seeing the same piece see something different. Much of what is perceived in a work is what the viewers bring, that sometimes supersedes what the artist envisions. It is a mix of one’s own likes, dislikes, prejudices, hopes, and fears, which we see in external objects. What is actually there is a different question altogether, and is conceivably never wholly grasped.</p> <p><img alt="" height="649" src="/sites/default/files/images/hrbacek_harlem-mother-and-child_2010.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 649px;" width="560" /></p> <p>This is why, in my opinion, conceptual art, a genre which relies extensively on written forms and narratives to explain the art works and their intensions, tends to close down viewer experience before it even has a chance to start. (Perhaps this statement is controversial?)</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> Why do think they work and how do you see the viewer sees them?</p> <p><strong>MH:</strong> It is possible that viewers find the ambiguity in my art challenging; there are unexpected yet discernible bodily references in most of my work. The piece called "Facing Front IV" is taken from a tree by Central Park South, which has a warm brownish gray "top" and a cool grayish brown base. "Warm" and "cool" are technical terms used in painting that create contrast and liveliness to a palette or color scheme. I wanted the tree to have a human aspect, so I switched the "warm" brown top zone for pink, the "cool" gray brown base for dull blue. I don’t want to get too technical, but I took certain liberties with the colors to create a dramatic effect of shimmering colorful transformation. In the piece "Tree Woman," the figure is clearly discernible, as seen in the original motif, which is a digital photograph of a tree near Central Park West that has a clear female form inscribed in relief in its trunk. I hopped over two fences to get the shot. I use a flat graphic color space to divorce the motif from naturalistic references, highlighting it to accentuate an iconic quality in the isolated image. It occurs to me that the use of a flat ground connects my organic biomorphic forms with hard edge abstraction to create a hybrid genre.</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> We are at a moment where the line between organic and synthetic is rapidly blurring. Your tree figures morph, they are organic, they are becoming something new. How much of your interest in them is related to the science of it… they are, in a way new forms.</p> <p><strong>MH:</strong> I think the fact that my hybrids tree-figures are new forms makes them noteworthy. I am not at all interested in the science of my vision and process. I just do it. Science is a field that I greatly respect but I have never had much affinity for. I am interested in the manifestations of poetry in the human bits and full figures that I am able to apprehend when I focus on a motif.</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> There are a lot of artists I can think of that are working in this way, Anna Ehrsam and her light experiment photos for example, Pedro Barcieto creating these geometric abstractions that meld machines and organic passages… What are you looking at? What is influencing you that is out there now?</p> <p><strong>MH:</strong> I have always had an affinity for abstraction, although it isn’t my gift. My work is poised on the cusp between abstraction and representation, not realistic at that. I admire Giuseppe Penone’s large-scale tree sculptures and I am drawn to the works of Leonardo Drew, whose massive black sculptural relief works and installations connect with my interests in dark forms and natural materials. I very much appreciate the wooden sculptures and constructions of Ursula von Ridingsvard. Adrian Ghenie morphs abstraction and realism in enormous wall sized painted tableaux (Pace Gallery 2017). I don't look much at anyone; I find my own way through an image to its final resolution in my work.</p> <p>I am crazy about the Old Masters; Rubens, Titian’s mythological themes, J.M.W. Turner, Claude Lorrain, Nicholas Poussin, Gainsborough, and of course Cezanne, Picasso and van Gogh.</p> <p><img alt="" height="493" src="/sites/default/files/images/hrbacek_use-refuse.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 493px;" width="560" /></p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> Your sculptures caught my eye immediately -- I see those and think what a great piece of set dressing for a Beckett play…</p> <p><strong>MH:</strong> Thank you for noticing my sculptures. I confess I know little about Beckett, but I will do some research. People say that my paintings are sculptural and my sculptures are painterly; this is my contrarian nature at play. I made about twenty-five pieces, but I had to stop as I lost my studio space due to contamination on my hallway. My current space is ten feet smaller, but I kept three sculptures to show visitors. When I was doing them, very few people said much about them. Now that I cannot make them anymore, people have begun to notice them. One day perhaps I will do some in my Vermont studio. I loved sculpting and drawing with metal. I painted them gold to signify the value of the found and discarded used objects that I combined with natural materials like sticks and pine cones, which I found in the Sequoia National Park in California.</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> What are you working on next and when will we see it?</p> <p><strong>MH:</strong> I am going back to Scandinavia this month so I will be photographing northern and Icelandic trees. I have some shots of trees growing out of restaurants and cafes in Greece, so I may explore images of obstructed bio-forms intersected by geometric architectural elements. Not sure. I did some strong charcoal drawings of these motifs last summer. I have to intuit what I want next, so I cannot be sure until I am ready to know what to do.</p> <p><strong>BR:</strong> Anything else?</p> <p><strong>MH:</strong> I started a painting of a tree located in Collioure, France that I want to develop. I call it "Pharaoh and the Woman" but of course it is a tree with a projecting figure-like form jutting forth from its side. The forms are deep black with burnt sienna highlights. I also want to paint some more bonsai tree images. That is all I can think of for the moment.</p> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 07 Nov 2017 09:57:51 +0000 Bradley Rubenstein 3577 at http://culturecatch.com Free, Form, Five http://culturecatch.com/index.php/art/free-form-five <span>Free, Form, Five</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/maryhrbacek" lang="" about="/index.php/users/maryhrbacek" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Hrbacek</a></span> <span>October 16, 2017 - 09:46</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/510" hreflang="en">painters</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div> <p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="433" src="/sites/default/files/images/Gottlieb%2C©A Cloud Study%2C Sunset No.2.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 373px;" width="650" /></p> <em>Free, Form, Five </em></div> <div>Curated by D. Dominick Lombardi</div> <div>Olga Wimmer PCC, NYC</div> <div>Oct. 7 - Nov. 18, 2017</div> <p>Elga Wimmer PCC presents "Free, Form, Five," a group exhibition curated by D. Dominick Lombardi, which explores abstract and semi-abstract themes with human and natural references that extend into metaphoric terrain. The exhibition includes photographer Sandra Gottlieb, Sharon Kagan, Bobbie Moline-Kramer, Rebecca Calderón Pittman and Susan Sommer. The artists use with vigor and assurance platforms that incorporate complex processes and aggregate techniques. Pittman's works probe the oblique role of chance in consciousness; the psychological influences of attraction and aversion interest Moline-Kramer. Kagan explores the microcosmic roots of matter while Gottlieb brings the firmament into focus. Susan Sommer records the rhythms of desire in daily existence. While Moline-Kramer, Pittman and Kagan enhance their practices with distinctive procedures, Gottlieb uses specialized equipment, and Sommer mixes her motifs to achieve a sense of depth and relevance that is becoming the exception rather than the rule in contemporary art.</p> <!--break--> <p>Sandra Gottlieb's new photographic series of cloud studies at sunset defies commonly held romantic assumptions about the acclaimed spectacle of the sunset leitmotif. (image top, <em>Coud Study, Sunset No.2</em>) With a 300-millimeter lens, Gottlieb captures a spectrum of rust red, warm gray and white edged with blue, in burgeoning clouds that convey a hint of a volcanic eruption. The deep blackness at the format’s horizon sends an edgy message that projects these images out of the realm of visual perception into a symbolic domain of awe and apprehension. They veer sharply from the conventional bright sunsets one normally envisions. Gottlieb transports the viewer directly into the midst of these roiling phenomena, whose shifting tones and portentous appearance may herald symbolically the approach of an impending storm or the advent of environmental upheavals.</p> <p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="650" src="/sites/default/files/images/Kagan%2C A Walk in the Park Joshua Tree 2017 36x36 mixed media.jpg" style="width: 560px;" width="650" /></p> <p>In her profound “twining” rope studies, Sharon Kagan discovers and highlights myriad microcosmic shapes she gleans from blown-up sections of drawings, to produce galaxies of forms in an exploration of the essence of matter that skirts the realms of science and philosophy. <em>(image abovie, A Walk in the Park Joshua Tree, 2017) </em>With vast networks of shapes set within systems of thick ropes, she creates an intricate space that undulates in a rhythmic universe of variations. The focus on rope as a motif implies binding or tying, as if the artist’s psyche or emotions are bound in a labyrinth that makes liberty or independence problematic. Yet these vibrant powerful works are optimistic, often rendered in nameable hues that shift them into familiar territory where, with persistence, enigmas can possibly be answered.</p> <p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="643" src="/sites/default/files/images/Bobbie Moline-Kramer%2C Ennui%2C 6 x 6 inches%2C colored gesso%2C glitter%2C neon paint%2C oil%2C 2015_0.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 554px;" width="650" /></p> <p>In an extended series of portrait paintings, Bobbie Moline-Kramer analyses character traits in which the feelings conveyed by facial expressions are intended to attract or repel others. She then paints non-representational patterns over the portraits, to create abstract imagery that correlates with the nature of the personality. Overlying painted patterns largely obscure the facial features. But the artist leaves enough to allow the works to exude a mysterious presence, as if someone hidden beneath is determined to emerge from obscurity. The abstract painted designs are meant to evoke the emotions of the expressions they subsume. In these pieces the realism of the facial forms paired with non-representational elements produce an intriguing hybrid tension on an intimate scale. (Image above,<em> Ennui, </em>2015)</p> <p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="1086" src="/sites/default/files/images/Pittman-invisible-font_0.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 936px;" width="650" /></p> <p>Rebecca Calderón Pittman makes transparent layered drawings and paintings that she overlaps in intuitive combinations, allowing chance to discover relationships between elements that come into her consciousness and daily experience. (image above, <em>Invisible Fon</em>t) These chance searches yield enigmatic, poetic tableaux in which connections are far from linear. They comprise fragmented stream-of-consciousness maps of the artist's unconscious, representing a visual diary of personal awareness that borders on dream imagery. The result is a sophisticated record with universal philosophical underpinnings that probes how memory recapitulates physical actions and the impressions they trigger. The ephemeral condition of broken lines and the elusive overlapped sequences of forms and configurations create an airy luminosity.</p> <div style="text-align:center"> <figure class="image" style="display:inline-block"><img alt="" height="512" src="/sites/default/files/images/Light in Autumn%2C 52x66%2C 2013_0.jpg" style="width: 560px;" width="650" /><figcaption>Caption</figcaption></figure></div> <p>It is significant that Susan Sommer lives a wooded region of upstate New York; her works resonate with the sense of growing vegetation. The works hint at the smell of earth in the woods, without any literal translation. While her abstract paintings are ostensibly related in appearance to the brushy abstraction of the Modernist genre, they have a compelling enigmatic energy born of the hybrid components they combine. The artist's use of primary-colored pixels or squares, which alludes to TV show or game board patterns, enlivens the muted viridian, hookers green and the ochre-softened warm umber that she so fluidly employs. She imbues her art with visual music in pulsating rhythms. Sommer’s poetic works may express in strokes the opens wings of an eagle in flight or the patterned movements of leafy branches as they sway in the wind. The artist's relationship with the earth infuses her art with the power of nature's infinite fluctuations.</p> </div> <section> </section> Mon, 16 Oct 2017 13:46:09 +0000 Mary Hrbacek 3640 at http://culturecatch.com Things Past http://culturecatch.com/index.php/art/brenda-goodman <span> Things Past</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/user/529" lang="" about="/index.php/user/529" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Bradley Rubenstein</a></span> <span>September 26, 2017 - 09:50</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div> <p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="467" src="/sites/default/files/images/Tomorrows-Promise-2017.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 463px;" width="650" /></p> Brenda Goodman: In a New Space</div> <div>David &amp; Schweitzer Contemporary, NYC</div> <div>September 8 - October 1, 2017</div> <div> </div> <p>If there is a thread that unites the varied bodies of work that the protean painter Brenda Goodman has produced over her five-decade career, it is the sense of urgency -- in the need of the artist to articulate her thoughts and emotions onto the painted surface, but also a feeling of immediacy in the directness of expression, the painterly "hand" manifest in the work. Even in the Ingre-esque drawings of her work in the 1970s, one senses Goodman's need to capture a moment, a relationship between her psychological characters, and then move on, leaving a generous space unfinished for the viewer to move around in. This restlessness pervades her work, in fact defines it, as she jumps from style to style, figure to abstraction, throughout different periods.</p> <!--break--> <p>What is most surprising about Goodman’s recent work, now on view at David &amp; Schweitzer, is a feeling of quiet introspection, a Proustian sense of contemplation, that pervades the paintings and works on paper, all created in the past year. To anyone familiar with Goodman's work, it comes as no surprise that to unfold the imagery, a hybrid of painterly syntax, might require some thoughtful participation. These powerful, compact paintings reveal themselves slowly, with the contingency of her previous works replaced by a weightier, architectural feel, at once both formally strong and psychologically layered with meaning.</p> <p>An aspect of the Surrealist movement, which holds greater relevance to many painters working today, was that there were two quite different approaches, stylistically and philosophically, to painting. The first, most iconic, was the “dream illustration” typified by Dalí; the second was a more literary-based “automatic writing” developed by Masson. It was this second, inward-looking manner of working that would have the greatest impact on American artists like Motherwell and Pollock. Goodman’s paintings harken back to both ways of working.</p> <p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="469" src="/sites/default/files/images/Lickety-Split-2017.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 404px;" width="650" /></p> <p>Most of these works begin with a scarified surface, for example <em>Lickety Split</em> (2017) (above), whose underlying mark-making resembles a Mark Tobey or a Masson. It is from this unconscious, random scraffiti she “discovers” forms; but through a process of editing and layering, these forms coalesce and resolve into “head” shapes that in turn form a sort of proscenium or stage, which frames an imagined, internal subconscious scene. The connection to the Abstract Expressionists is manifest in Goodman’s process; as she says, “I would say <em>Lickety Split</em> is probably one of the riskiest paintings I’ve ever done because it was a beginning, that upon looking at it for a few days, quickly became an end, and it was done.” This ambiguity, in which we are both “seeing” and “seeing into,” along with the painter, gives these paintings an internal tension as we unpack the imagery like a matryoshka doll. Goodman embraces wholeheartedly these contradictions; seldom is ambiguity been depicted so clearly.</p> <p>Goodman's anthropomorphized "stage heads" suggest the trope that Picasso used in his Guéridons of the 1920s. Goodman's work in the '70s used the idea of the painting as stage to give space to her morphing characters in scenes, imaginary relationships, and stories. Here, Goodman reinvests the concept further with personal anecdote, drawing on memories of her mother, childhood stories, and references to her partner Linda. In <em>Tomorrow's Promise</em> (2017) (top), stage, character, and story conflate. We can almost feel Goodman remembering and reflecting and recording memories through the medium of paint. Godard wrote that the most beautiful and difficult thing in cinema was capturing on film the moment when someone changes their mind. With these new paintings Goodman seems to be on the same search, for an elusive perfect moment, a memory from the past, happening still.</p> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 26 Sep 2017 13:50:56 +0000 Bradley Rubenstein 3627 at http://culturecatch.com In The Moment http://culturecatch.com/index.php/art/young_gil_kang <span>In The Moment</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/maryhrbacek" lang="" about="/index.php/users/maryhrbacek" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Hrbacek</a></span> <span>March 7, 2017 - 18:54</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="604" src="/sites/default/files/images/Turquoise_Limbo.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 520px;" width="650" /></p> <div>Young Gil Kang: <em>Limbo</em></div> <div>Terri Cultural Institute, NYC</div> <div>Thru March 18, 2017</div> <p>In modern idiom the term "limbo" refers to a condition of uncertainty, an intermediate stage in individuals’ lives and feelings. The word originates in the Christian tradition where the souls of unbaptized babies remain in a state of Limbo, separated through eternity from God due to "original sin." The show’'s name '"Limbo” brings focus to the significance and intentions of this exhibition of immersive large-scale photographic images curated by Thalia Vrachopoulos, Phd. and Suechung Koh. The Korean artist Kang, in collaboration with eminent actress and model Suae, creates photographs that submerge her in an enigmatic watery world where she strikes various poses wearing diverse garments. In some works, the perplexing iconography of tortuous underwater confinement yields inklings of contorted features that subtly suggest the torments of Hell itself. In one view the figure appears to dissolve into a funnel of black smoke as the "spirit" wafts upward, conceivably fated for an arduous end. While the show highlights the intimations of scenes where Suae rests sitting or lying inert in a pool, some of the works on view have political underpinnings as well.</p> <!--break--> <p>These sensuous works are breathtakingly dramatic, commensurate with a pared down opera scene. They sing visually, calling out a profound metaphysical story. The photo of a drowning girl in Korean traditional dress that billows out in the water, has connotations of national disaster in the wake of the sinking of a fully booked ferry transporting young people home from a group trip. The presiding government gave the matter little attention, which added acutely to the national pain. The descending female in the photo signifies the plummeting national respect held by the Korean people for their government.</p> <p>A clothed figure presents a more complex inscrutable image than a nude form with its attendant sensual implications. Light that hugs the dark tiled waters defines the mysterious web-like environment that surrounds the prone floating female. The rich rippling forms hold the viewer hostage to their compelling complexities. As a body floats, displacement in the water transports unexpected depths to the surface, reenergizing the waters of the psyche as cold currents descend (<em>The Book of Symbols, Water</em>, P. 38). The light in "Limbo-Beatrice," (pigment print on Korean paper, 145 cm x 200 cm, 2017) conveys the millions of stars in the galaxy that may soon become her future abode. Her blue voluminous dress conjures spiritual ties that keep her body afloat just beneath the water’s surface. Blue is the color of the sky and the sea. In the Christian religion it refers to the Virgin Mary as a regenerative mother figure. Water hints at fertility and refreshment as a source of sustained renewal.</p> <p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" height="480" src="/sites/default/files/images/Distorted_Features_Limbo.jpg" style="width: 560px; height: 413px;" width="650" /></p> <p>Art can be unfathomable; here there is a force that forges far beyond a Sunday religious experience into an unnamable domain where philosophical musings reach their boundaries. These works begin to flow into an allegorical realm in which water is both damning and cleansing. They convey us through the phases of life’s slippery slope, where eventually there is no return. We go forward, or down into a place we created out of our own volition, in a life of constant enticement that is too strong to resist. I interpret these works as metaphorical stages, or incidences of temptation that confront us universally in all our lives. The outcomes we create from our decisions are documented in the liquid grave-like confines that flow in perpetuity with energy and life. In alchemical lore, the mercurial sea symbolizes the function of female transformational powers; drowning in volatile liquid is linked to amniotic fluid that suggests the “stage before a state of rebirth, death and the first gasp of breath.” (<em>The Book of Symbols</em>, Water p. 33)</p> <p>When photography was initially invented, figurative artists feared they would become outdated as photography so readily captures the visual reality of the physical world. But artists like to put their own stamp on their visions and processes. Perhaps it is not perceived as challenging or fulfilling to merely snap a picture. The photographs on view are anything but easy. They are profound symbolic representations of life as we progress toward our eternal fate. They are more like atmospheric paintings than paintings themselves. Such is the kaleidoscopic evolution of the individual artist as he carves his way through the tangled maze of art history to find and make his own enduring mark on his genre. Kang succeeds emphatically.</p> </div> <section> </section> Tue, 07 Mar 2017 23:54:24 +0000 Mary Hrbacek 3548 at http://culturecatch.com Behind The Red Door http://culturecatch.com/index.php/dusty/emergency_arts <span>Behind The Red Door</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>August 13, 2006 - 10:39</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/772" hreflang="en">art collective</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>I'm honored to be a founding member of a Chelsea-based art collective called Emergency Arts.</p> <p>What is it?</p> <p>Imagine <a href="https://arcosanti.org/" target="_blank">Arcosanti</a> meets "free" Art Commune (working out of a generously donated, rent-free space) in an enormous building in the West 20s with a "secret" red door entrance. EA was masterminded by Melody Weir and her friend, the building's landlord. Not just as workspaces for the artists, but also common areas to curate shows and share our mission statement and ethos. Each artist is building out his/her own space with found or recycled objects. These spaces will function as work and gallery spaces to curate shows, etc. Many important art and media people are now starting to come in and out of the space and it will afford both the artists and the curious a synergy of uncompromised vitality and awareness.</p> <p>This is our mission statement:</p> <p>EMERGENCY is a group of multi-disciplinary artists and media creators who are responding to environmental, social and political crises within New York City and around the globe. Our Manhattan home base is the heart of the Chelsea Art District and houses projects presenting creative solutions to our most pressing problems. These projects range from humanitarian aid organizations to environmental companies to alternative energy producers to artists whose work focuses on the most pressing issues of the moment. The building itself is a showcase of sustainable construction featuring recycled building materials, super-efficient electrical systems, green-roofing, and collective responsibility. We see this project as proof-positive of what can be done to rebalance our policies and practices, thus helping to improve the world through beautiful yet pragmatic solutions.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="450" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-04/emergency-arts-dusty-wright.jpg?itok=5jUL9swi" title="emergency-arts-dusty-wright.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="640" /></article><figcaption>Photo Credit: Dusty Wright</figcaption></figure><p>Artists are often on the front line of raising our collective social consciousness. Regardless of your feelings about U2's music, lead singer Bono has done more with his celebrityhood in promoting a healthier planet and people than any recent pop culture figure I can name. Using a more modest profile, actor/EA member Matthew Modine has taken it upon himself to use his leverage in New York and Hollywood to make a difference. He'll be producing his new documentary out of our space as well as launching numerous eco-friendly campaigns to lessen the impact of waste in New York City -- campaigns we hope will be adapted globally, like Mayor Bloomberg's "smoke free" campaign has been adopted by municipalities all over the world. (I sat with him for a lengthy podcast that I'll be posting shortly.)</p> <p>Modine's got a terrific campaign to replace traditional plastic utensils that so dominate our "carry-out" food culture with biodegradable corn starch-based cutlery. This will revolutionize the fast food business and eliminate yet another pollution problem. You can read more detailed info on this fascinating application at Biodegradable Food Service. Modine is also spearheading a two-wheeled global event called "BICYCLE FOR A DAY". He's completed a three-minute film that will promote this exceptional worldwide event in June 2007. You'll be able to watch it as a vidcast on our site as well.</p> <p>We have a group of young artists called Armada that has just completed its Mississippi River raft -- two Volkswagen Rabbit diesel engines converted to run on waste vegetable oil (used fryer grease) will power the propeller -- that launched this past weekend. They're looking to spread their message by floating down this mighty river on a raft built out of found objects.</p> <p>The Miss Rockaway Armada is a group of approximately 25 performers and artists from all over the country including members of the Toyshop Collective, Visual Resistance, The Amateurs, The Floating Neutrinos, The Infernal Noise Brigade, The Madagascar Institute, and the Rude Mechanical Orchestra. This July they will converge in Minneapolis to construct a flotilla of rafts that will journey down the Mississippi River. They'll stop in towns along the way, hosting musical performances and vaudeville variety-theater in the evenings, along with workshops and skill-shares centered around arts and environmental issues during the day. In their travels they intend to share stories and to solicit dialog around subversive and constructive ways of living. They are a group of intrepids who believe in a hands-on, live-by-example approach to creating change within our culture. They are taking cues from Johnny Appleseed, traveling medicine shows, nomadic jewel box theater, and of course that old radical Mark Twain.</p> <p>And our friend and advisor Scott Harrison at <a href="http://www.charitywater.org" target="_blank">Charity Water</a> is currently working on an urban "money for water" campaign to deliver clean water to people who have none (1.2 billion people don't have clean water in the world, more than 1 billion people have to walk three miles for water that might not even be clean, and 25,000 people die every day due to water-related diseases). He also brings to the group his first hand experience on a mercy ship; ocean vessels providing health care to the poor in port areas around the world. His compassion and energy is boundless. We are blessed to have him as part of our collective.</p> <p>We at EA are also currently seeking eco-friendly sustainable energy sources. (Perhaps some readers can help me locate sources to contact to see if anybody might be interested in donating materials or using our space to test materials to help better offset the ever-rising electrical costs we will soon accrue.) I've been in touch with wind turbine companies that might be interested in testing some models on our roofline. We are also considering a living "green" roof that will help insulate the building and offer many invaluable additions to our cooperative.</p> <p>If any of you would like to know more about wind power, I would encourage you to watch a wind power documentary about its positive impact on communities that have adopted this clean energy alternative. No noise, no safety issues, no pollution. You can access an amazing educational documentary about wind power at The Alliance for Clean Energy New York.</p> <p>In six short weeks, we've made tremendous progress in building our urban utopia, and I'm certain all of us would like to help raise our positive consciousness globally. We should all pitch in, regardless of how hopeless you may feel, eliminating all cultural, ethnic, religious, and political barriers to promote a world that deserves to be as healthy as its inhabitants.</p> <p>I would encourage you all to pursue bio-sustainable and bio-diversity programs in your day-to-day life and in your community. Examine environment-friendly energy sources and how they can augment your lifestyle. It can be as simple as picking up litter in your neighborhood or bringing your own tote bag grocery shopping. It's imperative that we replace oil-derivative products with bio-sustainable ones. We have an emergency-level need to integrate bio-diversity and bio-sustainable systems into all of our daily lives.</p> <p>I'll leave you with one of my favorite maxims, which our Native Americans championed so many years ago and that rings even more relevant today: "In our every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations."</p> </div> <section> </section> Sun, 13 Aug 2006 14:39:56 +0000 Dusty Wright 288 at http://culturecatch.com Terrain http://culturecatch.com/index.php/dusty/kim-foster-gallery-terrain <span>Terrain</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/index.php/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>June 8, 2006 - 19:37</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/204" hreflang="en">abstract expressionism</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <figure class="image"><img alt="outoftheloop.jpg" height="455" src="/sites/default/files/images/outoftheloop.jpg" width="650" /><figcaption>Image courtesy of Kim Foster Gallery</figcaption></figure><p><a href="http://www.kimfostergallery.com" target="_blank">Kim Foster Gallery</a></p> <p>529 West 20th Street, New York, NY 10012</p> <p>Open Tuesday - Saturday</p> <p>June 3rd - July 6th, 2006</p> <p>For those of us squashed into uncomfortably tight areas of space in New York City, we either loathe or appreciate the value of land, regardless how small or large our domiciles might actually be, or how grand we wishfully imagine them. Kim Foster's comfortably spacious Chelsea gallery affords twelve contemporary artists ample territory to define and display their own landscapes, one of the oldest themes in art. Micro or macro, small or large parcels. Land, vistas, plateaus; canyons of steel, even relief work that is indistinguishable from any vantage can all be called terrain. <!--break-->Be clear, these are not the conventional landscape paintings of the early Hudson Valley masters. One of my favorite pieces is the three-dimensional "Aggregation" by Korea-based Kwang-Young Chun. Each tiny node/triangle is a hand-wrapped, century-old, handmade mulberry paper from medicinal bottles arranged in such fashion as to create a relief map of some mythic landscape. Depending on one's vantage, it is either an exhilarating interpretation of an aerial topography of some nearly-known continent or a close up of a moisture-deprived surface.</p> <p>By contrast, the cropped vantages of Antonio Petracca's two oil pieces offer tantalizingly detailed glimpses of very real places. The spin is how he's purposely cropped off large chunks of information (and canvas), letting the viewer fill in the remaining terrain. "Lake Louise," his oil on wood construction, might be the view from a speeding train in some European country, that moment when you look up from your book and catch a glimpse of the idyllic countryside quickly slipping past you.</p> <p>The exhilarating voyeuristic paintings by Louis Renzoni depict strangers alone in a landscape caught in a moment of intoxicating bliss or paranoiac anxiety. His large oil canvas "Out of the Loop" (image above) glows with a midsummer's haze of the blossoming sensuality of young maidens (picnicking nymphs?) unfurling into unsuspecting sexual sirens amidst nature. Theirs is the blissful terra firma of youth and vitality, a terrain that the old and wise cherish with each passing year.</p> <p>With New York and other sprawling metropolises being squeezed upward, these artists have invented alternative vistas to supplant the pinched urban provinces that have become for many just a distant memory. For certain, there is much to be mined in these domains.</p> </div> <section> </section> Thu, 08 Jun 2006 23:37:29 +0000 Dusty Wright 269 at http://culturecatch.com