Art Review http://culturecatch.com/index.php/art en A Short Talk with Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3955 <span>A Short Talk with Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" lang="" about="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Cullen</a></span> <span>July 11, 2020 - 09:43</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-07/black_matisse.jpg?itok=hfrlUvAT" title="black_matisse.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Mattise Negro</figcaption></figure><p>I recently viewed the work of Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave and the imagery piqued my interest in learning more about his work. I found this quote in relation to a solo show he had at the Bronx Museum in 2015.</p> <blockquote> <p>"Jeffrey Hargrave's work taps into his own memories of growing up in the midst of a sharply divided community. Hargrave translates his personal experiences into playful, yet biting images that mix art-history clichés and racial stereotypes. Ultimately, the artist seeks to engage the viewer in a dialogue on class and privilege based on a repertoire of familiar images." - Bronx Museum Director of Curatorial and Education Programs, Sergio Bessa</p> </blockquote> <p>I think the quote really encapsulates the work and had a chance to talk with the artist, who I found to be a wonderful storyteller. I wanted to share our discussion as his work and words are a timely reflection of life in America. </p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen:</strong> The show at the Bronx Museum was a strong success for you. As you revisit the quote from the curator what would you say if anything has changed in your work and message? </p> <p><strong>Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave: </strong>It still rings true to me now as it did then, perhaps even more so at our present moment.</p> <p>Growing up in "extreme poverty" was difficult, especially in a town of exorbitant wealth. In regards to my use of racial stereotypes, it's tricky. This is especially true in an age where monuments are being ripped down, airports are being re-named overnight and police are demonized nationwide. I paint from my heart along with my experiences. The one thing I've learned is that those who forget their past are sometimes doomed to repeat it.</p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen: </strong>Can you share with us what has influenced your work? Also what impact did your professional training have?</p> <p><strong>Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave: </strong>Art History influences and informs my work. Funny, enough I failed Art History twice. The first time while a high school senior at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts and The second time at the Rhode Island School of Design. Perhaps this is why I'm so captivated by it now. Professional training helped significantly, especially in regards to learning new ways of thinking and how to engage critically with my fellow students and professors.</p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen: </strong>In your work you reference iconic images from Matisse to Disney. How do you choose these images and for what purpose?</p> <p><strong>Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave: </strong>I try and select images that are most identifiable to Pop Culture.</p> <p>Then I filter images such as Mickey Mouse, through the lens of Black Culture.</p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen: </strong>In the past couple of years the art market had begun to focus on African American artists. Now it has been greatly shut down by Covid. In addition, the recent killing of George Floyd, has asked us all to re-examine our country's institutional racism. How have these factors affected your work in regards to your focus and the commercial aspects?</p> <p><strong>Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave: </strong>Not much, I've dealt with work in relation to my experience as an African American man for decades now. </p> <p>Covid may have affected the art market, but I create so that I can better understand myself and relate to others through my work. I don't make art solely for the market.</p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen: </strong>You are currently developing a print edition. Can you tell us about that project and how you are developing the images and when they will be available?</p> <p><strong>Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave: </strong>I'm working with my art dealer, Greg Smith (Owner\Director) of Contemporary Art and Editions on an upcoming Print Portfolio. I would love to see my "Matisse Negro" in print edition form.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3955&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="E880UdDKNXDr3qAGvxHyhUr9ESfyLMx_HmnvZ01-KZ8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 11 Jul 2020 13:43:39 +0000 Kathleen Cullen 3955 at http://culturecatch.com Short Talk With Jen Dragon http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3953 <span>Short Talk With Jen Dragon</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" lang="" about="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Cullen</a></span> <span>June 30, 2020 - 19:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/819" hreflang="en">art conversation</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-07/jen_dragon_at_brenda_goodman_exhibit-_sikkema_jenkins.jpg?itok=PW0E7Vn6" width="1200" height="900" alt="Thumbnail" title="jen_dragon_at_brenda_goodman_exhibit-_sikkema_jenkins.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Katharine T. Carter &amp; Associates has a long established history in marketing artists and launching careers. Recently Jen Dragon joined this company as the Associate Director of Special Projects at Katharine T. Carter &amp; Associates, overseeing the social media and digital marketing division. Given the huge shift to online galleries because of the health concern I thought it was timely to speak to Jen about this exciting synergy.</p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen:</strong> Tell us how you first came to know Katharine T. Carter and when the collaboration became an idea.</p> <p><strong>Jen Dragon:</strong> Before I started working with Katharine, I had a brick-and-mortar gallery in Saugerties called Cross Contemporary Art. I first heard of Katharine before we met as she has an impressive reputation in the artmarketing field. One day, an art critic was visiting the gallery and needed a ride to her office in Kinderhook to see an artist's work. I volunteered to drive him as an excuse to meet her. On our visit, she insisted we drive nearby to visit Jack Shainman’s School as well as Art Omi. About a year after that magical afternoon, I decided to close my gallery space and take on curatorial projects and digital marketing for my artists. Coincidently, I heard she was looking for a new associate, and I applied. I have been with KTC since Sept. 2019. KTC was interested in my consulting with her company to build on-line marketing strategies that would be indispensable for her clients. This collaboration culminated in the co-creation of Cross Contemporary Partners</p> <p><strong>KC:</strong> In this collaboration, given the strengths of both your backgrounds, what do you feel the mission of this division of your company will be? And how will that be different from other programs and services you offer?</p> <p><strong>JD: </strong>Katharine has a solid background in guiding artists' careers, securing exhibitions in museums and other non-profit spaces, as well as building their reputations in the art world. My skills are different. I understand how to grow the artist's "digital footprint" through social media. Our mission remains the same: serving the career growth of our artist clients through the multiple platforms in our toolbox. For Katharine, it is her 35 year relationships with curators, her knowledge and practiced eye; for me, it is my background in Online Marketing and experience as a gallerist. It is the combination of our respective talents that provides artists with a complete 21st Century marketing strategy.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>Given the change in the art world with the recent pandemic, what is the business model of the new company? How is this different from what you had originally intended?  </p> <p><strong>JD: </strong>The Pandemic has created a sense of urgency. By launching Cross Contemporary Partners, the new division at Katharine T. Carter &amp; Associates, we effectively address the current challenges faced by the art world and its sudden shift to the internet. This was the ideal moment to develop Cross Contemporary Partners because technology and new ideas are emerging daily which offer elegant viewing rooms, 3-D galleries, virtual studio visits via Zoom, and Instagram LIVE… and we plan to incorporate this and much more into what we do for artists! However, we intend to maintain the tactile aspect of marketing: utilizing elegant catalogues with essays by leading art critics and curators, providing high quality color reproduction, supportive written correspondence in a highly professional presentation delivered directly to art professionals across the country as a prelude to the actual art installation in a museum. This traditional approach has led to securing over 1000 exhibitions nationwide. </p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>Together you have unique perspectives at both curating and marketing.  Going forward, given that it's now a collaboration, how will you select the artists that you represent and still maintain your individual voices?</p> <p><strong>JD: </strong>We generally see eye-to-eye on almost everything regarding aesthetics and marketing logistics. Katharine has is an encyclopedic knowledge of artists and their work, museum directors and curators, and more often than not, knows them personally. Her team of Associates is comprised of leading critics, curators, designers, videographers and technicians working in tandem to achieve desired results; my skillset is more connected to the nuts and blots of art handling and installation, gallery management and using digital marketing to promote artist events. Where we dovetail is in the effectiveness of our presentation formats and marketing focus: hitting the high notes respectively as we draw attention to our artists and their work. Katharine knows how to tangibly guide their careers and I know how to digitally support events, engaging audiences for exhibitions, and creating gallery interest for potential representation and sales.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>Indulge us with a show that you would love to do without concerns of social distancing or economics? Please provide us with the details?</p> <p><strong>JD: </strong>Ideally, we would love to curate an exhibition of our Cross Contemporary Partners artists: Anne Hieronymus, Sol Hill, Kaethe Kauffman, Victoria Lowe, Deborah Masters, John Lyon Paul, Nancy Macko,<b> </b>Francie Lyshak, Robert Mango, Bobbie Moline-Kramer, and Martin Weinstein in a huge industrial building with 20 foot high ceilings. But because of the pandemic, we are instead installing their work in our new 3-D virtual gallery space hosted by Kunstmatrix in Berlin which realistically replicates the look and feel of the actual gallery or museum experience. To prepare for the CCP launch and our new 3-D gallery space, we have been curating an online exhibition fundraiser for the Woodstock Film Festival. For 24 years, the WFF has been the lynchpin for arts and culture in our region contributing over time more than 250 million dollars to sustaining economic viability in our area. If we lose this event, we lose a lot! Katharine and I have reached out to every painter, sculptor and printmaker we know to create an online benefit sale. Our artists responded to our call and have generously donated amazing work to support the festival, and more art just keeps coming! You can visit the growing exhibition listings on Artsy here: <a href="http://bit.ly/wffbenefit20" target="_blank">http://bit.ly/wffbenefit20</a> and we will launch the virtual 3-D gallery on June 19th. </p> </div> <ul class="links inline list-inline"><li class="comment-add"><a href="/index.php/node/3953#comment-form" title="Share your thoughts and opinions." hreflang="en">Add new comment</a></li></ul><section> <a id="comment-2047"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1594257822"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/index.php/comment/2047#comment-2047" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Congratulations!</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Yeah, Jen.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2047&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="eWmDcTaE5L92YI5QNaVQ4cl9rRBoLvwp9ip5cKrHNaw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <a rel="nofollow" href="https://greenkill.substack.com/p/fred-duignan-exhibition-july-2020" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Fred Duignan</a> on July 7, 2020 - 12:37</p> </footer> </article> <a id="comment-2049"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1594257792"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/index.php/comment/2049#comment-2049" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Katherine Carter</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I have the utmost respect for Katherine T. Carter and her associates, all top notch. First met her in Northampton, MA in the early '90's at Hart Gallery for a talk and followed by a studio visit also did an excursion to NYC galleries another time. I've used what she taught me now for decades.<br /> Jen, I've been following you since Millicent Young exhibited at your gallery. It seems your timing couldn't have been better with the need for quality virtual exhibitions.<br /> It may be time to reconnect, so glad Jen you working with her organization.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2049&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="2sEG4LUADQnXzsiBFS49RPI09gW02uS4EAGdUT9lh-Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Terry Rooney</span> on July 8, 2020 - 12:55</p> </footer> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3953&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="OjSMgHJuvrMBQtGZwR13S5VL5_GVT3biIOGEfnE5f-8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 30 Jun 2020 23:45:43 +0000 Kathleen Cullen 3953 at http://culturecatch.com Short Talk With Greg Smith http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3941 <span>Short Talk With Greg Smith</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" lang="" about="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Cullen</a></span> <span>April 29, 2020 - 14:16</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/873" hreflang="en">art collector</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-05/greg-smith-photo.jpg?itok=rxutegRb" width="1200" height="1800" alt="Thumbnail" title="greg-smith-photo.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><strong>Kathleen Cullen:</strong> Your background had been in law and the academic side of politics before you decided to focus on art. Can you describe how that happened?</p> <p><strong>Greg Smith: </strong> I've been engaged with a passion for beauty for as long as I can remember. Being raised by four amazing women who were professionally or by avocation involved in music, drawing and fashion, certainly shaped my life. At six I was out in the sun with artists' oil paints, black electric tape, and a brush looking to create arte povera Mondrian interpretations on canvas boards. Their absence from my attic would imply my mother's curatorial disapproval. But this passion grew and though I was talented at tennis and teaching it to raise a little money for law school, l always loved it for its beauty (Go Roger Federer!) and spirit more than the competitive aspects. In a strange way the same was true for my love of the law. I had the good fortune to have been the law clerk to <em>The Reader's Digest</em> throughout most of law school. Where I worked there were fine art masterpieces everywhere.  So when I first started earning money I bought a little Jean Michel Folon piece, "Le Voyage" and later saw it featured in TIME magazine. It turned out to be an allegory for the rest of my life; a voyage in art, music, law, and tennis.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1596" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-05/folon-time-cover.jpg?itok=4ogqGesz" title="folon-time-cover.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Jean Michel Folon, "Le Voyage"</figcaption></figure><p>As to art, my affection for prints, to be honest, is because I feel that the best way to bring fine art to the most people is through fine art works on paper. While I’ve certainly worked around many people who could likely afford the paintings of the giants. They have never been a large part of my social circle and I'm much more interested in bringing the pleasure of the ownership of works of art by those same giants to the wonderful, sensitive, intelligent, and aspirational yet perhaps less well-heeled members of the public.</p> <p><strong>KC:  </strong>What were your thoughts in doing this politically oriented show at this time?</p> <p><strong>GS:  </strong>Well we live in interesting times, do we not?  In fact, it occurs to me that "May You Live in Interesting Times" was the title of the last Venice Biennale which I was able to attend on separate occasions last year. While I don’t think that the Biennale was focused on the political aspects of art, per se, there is no denying that politics and the culture wars associated with politics have a long, deep and storied place in international fine art. There was no shortage of reference points on a plethora of political subjects in Venice. As for me, I wanted to highlight some aspects of my collection that speak to the themes of politics and culture. Of course, the show is not meant to come even remotely close to an exhaustive survey, but I hope it's entertaining and a little thought provoking in this election year. I wanted to launch this now just to be part of the conversation.</p> <p><strong>KC:  </strong>In some of the pieces in the show, iconic figures include Mao, Gorbachev, and Trump. In some ways these leaders are objectified. What do you think is the artists' goal in including these figures?</p> <p><strong>GS:  </strong>I think the goal for any individual artist may be different in his or her own mind.  But the mere representation of a major political or cultural figure is, in itself, going to create a conversation in the mind of the viewer. In some cases, it seems clear to me that the full dialogue that an individual image may be seeking to subsume can be quite complicated and even to the point where the beauty, or let's say visual appeal, of a piece can sort of camouflage its broader political or cultural meaning.  It's interesting.</p> <p><strong>KC:  </strong>The show also includes the Mel Bochner piece "Kick Against The Pricks." This is done in a very different style than other work in the show. What was his original intent and in what way is the work reframed given the context of what's going on today?</p> <p><strong>GS:  </strong>This was a print that was offered by an organization called "Downtown 4 Democracy" back in 2018. The organization itself had a stated objective to encourage people to come out and vote. This work and the other works that were offered were all anti-Trump, anti-Republican, and some things that were coming out, like this work, held an implicit message of physical fury. I can't say whether this particular message had any impact on behavior but I suppose all political messaging is like that. It's throwing the spaghetti up against the intellectual wall and seeing what sticks. No one can say whether Mel Bochner's message, which is also suffused with his "Blah Blah Blah" motif, actually caused anyone to go vote one way or the other. I'm sure its theme of implied violence also might repel and counter motivate a voter or two. But regardless, the Democrats took the House of Representatives in 2018 so I guess Downtown 4 Democracy can claim some credit. I also suppose someone somewhere at some time saw some ad on Facebook that was run by some Russians in 2016 to ostensibly help Donald Trump. But of course, no one can ever say that it actually influenced anyone’s vote and to tell you the truth I have never seen even one of those ads reproduced anywhere so I don't even know whether they even happened.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="302" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-05/mel-bochner-kick-against-the-pricks-1-800x800.jpg?itok=6GW0p92y" title="mel-bochner-kick-against-the-pricks-1-800x800.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="800" /></article><figcaption>Mel Bochner, "Kicking Against The Pricks"</figcaption></figure><p>As an art matter, I know of no one who is creating art that is embraced by the art world in general or who is even working in the art world and who is espousing a conservative message. I'm not sure that its healthy but there is no question that within the messages that emit from the art world are many positive and thought-provoking ones that deal with inclusivity, gender inequality, racial insensitivity and any other number of issues that are very healthy to consider. I've tried to deal with some of those issues in my own work.</p> <p><strong>KC:  </strong>You have also included a photograph of Shirin Neshat. In the picture she is holding a shotgun. What does this image bring to the message of the show? Do you think the context is different now than when it was created?</p> <p><strong>GS: </strong> I think that the implications of this image have not shifted since it was created over 25 years ago. I don't believe that real progress has been made in either direction when it comes to a collective understanding in the west of the cultural history or political realities or aspirations of women in general and Muslim women of the Middle East in particular. I remember playfully chastising a Saudi man who was on a taxi line with me in Shanghai over his wife's not yet being able to drive. Somehow, I don't think he appreciated the humor but the wry smile on her face said everything.  </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1600" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-05/woman-of-alah-photo_1.jpg?itok=RkGsRTKF" title="woman-of-alah-photo.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Shirin Neshat “Woman of Allah” series, B &amp; W photograph with writing, 16 x 12 inches</figcaption></figure><p> Maybe the meanings of this work are more layered now but the intellectual structure is an immovable object. It's easy for us to forget what actually happened in Iran, especially when no one wants to talk about it, understand how we created it, or understand how painful and unforgettable that history was.</p> <p><strong>KC:  </strong>There is diversity to the work despite the overarching theme. One aspect is the timelessness of the work despite the world's changing political climate. Can you explain why, for a collector, this type of work maintains its significance and some idea of moving forward; what to watch for in future purchases?</p> <p><strong>GS: </strong> Well its true. I started collecting Russian nonconformist works in the 1980s and then worked on a couple of projects with Alexander Kosolapov and later moved on to work emerging from China and all along have picked up a few things pertaining to domestic politics.  In art, up until today, you see the major economic, political, and cultural geographies represented in the context of their place in history. The less visible cultures are rarely represented. A niche cultural, geographical or event driven addition to a collection is not a bad idea.  My advice is to choose what you love and what lays down a marker for you in your life. A good thing about art is that it doesn’t command a particular political point of view but contextualizes and at least permits its expression.  </p> <p>As to timelessness, all I can say is that the world moves slowly. Very, very, slowly. An art collection allows you to see your life and appreciate it in the context of your visual experiences every day you walk into that special room that holds that memory. Sometimes art reminds us of what we should be thinking about when we would be otherwise occupied with the mundane. Plus it can be a lot of fun.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3941&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="evC2QYf_9JdsJ6X8AIXKjN_vjI9vhuFPUy42XvvDFi4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 29 Apr 2020 18:16:33 +0000 Kathleen Cullen 3941 at http://culturecatch.com A Horse Is A Horse Of Course... http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3939 <span>A Horse Is A Horse Of Course...</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/webmaster" lang="" about="/index.php/users/webmaster" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Webmaster</a></span> <span>April 19, 2020 - 13:16</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/668" hreflang="en">group show</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nrAMTpQjLZc?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>"A Horse Walks in a Bar"</p> <p>Curated by D. Dominick Lombardi</p> <p>Hampden Gallery at UMass Amherst</p> <p>From 7th March 2020</p> <p>During the Covid-19 lockdown, artists and their many patrons have had to go completely digital to view any new work. With that in mind, Culture Catch writer/artist/curator D. Dominick Lombardi takes us on a digital stroll thru his latest curated spectacle which examines humor in the world of fine art. Sadly, the show itself was only open to the public for two weeks prior to the entire world's shutdown. But thankfully his narrated YouTube video above offers some historical context to the whit and whimsy represented by many of the artist in the show.  It's far more engaging than just a rote history lesson.</p> <p>"A Horse Walks Into a Bar" features pieces that reflect a very broad range of humor by artists: Isak Applin, Michelle Burdine, Chris Bors, Sally Curcio, Cynthia Consentino, Don Doe, Matthew Garrison, Rina Goldfield, Bill Gusky, Scott Hatt, Todd Herzberg, James Hilger, Amy Johnquest, Maria Karametou, Alex Kvares, Rick Krieger, China Marks, Nicholas Moore, Kirk Nachman, Brian Novatny, Rachel Phillips, David Terry, Brian Turkowski, Hans Van Meeuwen, Lucy White, and Robert Zott.</p> <p>The video was created by Erin Alzapiedi, Fine Arts Center Marketing Assistant and UMass Amherst Class of 2020 and overseeing the production was Melissa Breor. Footage collected by Rosie Cruz, Director of Operations at the Fine Arts Center, and Lyle Denit, Facilities Manager at the Fine Arts Center.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3939&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="J5lPVymAAh1r_fyBHDTUVYuwpGzlB7SsaxK1wj4tyKY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 19 Apr 2020 17:16:43 +0000 Webmaster 3939 at http://culturecatch.com A Look Back http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3935 <span>A Look Back</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/user/349" lang="" about="/index.php/user/349" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dom Lombardi</a></span> <span>April 11, 2020 - 21:14</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-04/gallery_installation_view.jpg?itok=uVRZug9C" width="1200" height="431" alt="Thumbnail" title="gallery_installation_view.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>This past October was the opening of <i>Artwork/An Exhibition</i> at SBM (Small Bands of Misbehavior)</p> <p>Studio 929 Canal. The pop up gallery was situated in Middletown, NY, in a film studio run by Courtenay Williams and Kai Lee -- a place where "creating environments, transforming spaces, strengthening context, and shaping experiences" has been their primary focus over the past ten years. I met Courtenay and Kai a few years ago, when I was working as a scenic artist on a crew run by Roman Turovsky, and I was immediately impressed by their unique approach to production design and direction. Impressed because they were both extremely respectful and mindful towards all crews and members, handling every aspect of the job with a very high level of professionalism, and without talking down to.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="825" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-04/victor_barroso_untitled.jpg?itok=FB47uzfF" title="victor_barroso_untitled.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="750" /></article><figcaption>Victor Barroso, Untitled (1981), acrylic on canvas, 44 x 44 inches</figcaption></figure><p>With all this stated, I was happy to take the long drive up to their place of business to see what they had in store fine art-wise, for their local, Middletown community. The exhibition, which featured the work of over a dozen solo artists and co-conspirators, was tremendously diverse in style and media. The premise of the exhibition is that most artists, unless they are independently wealthy, must work in another or related field to survive and create. For instance, <b>Victor Barroso</b>, who works as a VFX Compositor (a mixer of digital and live action footage) and Non-Union Scenic, offered a drip painting that focused on the potential of controlling chaos. <i>Untitled</i> (1981), a canvas that was begun with a rough color field approach dominated by a bold diagonal that split the canvas in half, was riddled afterwards with colorful veils of drips cascading from all four sides. By spinning the canvas as he worked, Barosso created something of a nerve network, tension in depth that precisely recorded time and space.    </p> <p><b>Daniel Grant</b>, a Maker of Contemporary Furniture and Accessories, revealed a kinship with indigenous peoples as his paintings reflect the aesthetics of Native Americans and Aboriginal Australians. A most striking connection is <i>Arrival</i> (1984), which reminded this reviewer of how Aboriginal artists very often focused on the location of water in their mesmerizingly beautiful, and often dream-like compositions. On the other hand, <i>Unbound</i> (1979) is far more spiritual in its intent, linking all earthly beings to the higher power of the Gods of nature.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="749" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-04/image_3_andrew_heikkila-old_hay_barn.jpg?itok=SztyHZG2" title="image_3_andrew_heikkila-old_hay_barn.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="500" /></article><figcaption>Andrew Heikkila, Old Hay Barn (2019), digital C glossy print, 31x46"</figcaption></figure><p><b>Andrew Heikkila</b>, a Union Prop Specialist, presented three inspiring color photographs that uncover the more magical effects of light. <i>Makela Tree</i> and <i>Bryce Canyon</i>, both from 2019, illustrate the endless possibilities in nature both earthly and heavenly. <i>Old Hay Barn</i> of the same year is far more theatrical in its narrative as selective spot lighting intensifies the drama and the dynamics. With all three, there remains that endlessness, near feeling of vertigo triggered by the presence of the Milky Way. <b>Judith Hoyt</b>, a Childcare Provider, creates assemblages that fall primarily into the category of Folk Art, often hinting at and referencing Dada and Surrealism. One common link throughout her work is a nod to nature, while the found rusted metal she incorporates in her compositions illustrates one of the more relentless aspects of nature, its ability to reclaim lost elements.</p> <p><b>Margot Kingon</b>, who works as a Union Electrician, had a number of curiously composed and fastidiously fabricated works on display that are more current today, than the day they were made. In this time of a global pandemic, our entire planet is dealing with a number of issues and emotions including anxiety, fear and loneliness. <i>Wall/Boy</i> (2017), <i>Boy Looking Out</i> (2015) and <i>Mountain Boy</i> (2017) in particular reflect isolation and a lack of information, as we often feel frustrated by worsening mismanagement, a lack of leadership and endlessly contrasting information.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="501" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-04/margot_kingon_boy_looking_out.jpeg?itok=pTJw-D6n" title="margot_kingon_boy_looking_out.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="500" /></article><figcaption>Margot Kingon, Boy Looking Out (2015), photograph and latex paint on wood panel, 12 x 12 inches</figcaption></figure><p><b>Todd Koelmel</b>, an Engineer, appropriated a sort of 1960's Hard Edge approach to making landscape and seascape paintings. By minimizing representations of form and color, Koelmel gets down to the essence of the visual experience, while simultaneously broadening the scope of the understanding. <b>James Lee</b>, the retired Editorial Art Director, offered his version of landscape painting with <i>Fraser Valley</i>. Painted in 1958. <i>Fraser Valley </i>exemplifies a far more atmospheric approach to the representation of nature than Koelmel, an approach that left me with a soothing and comforting view of a bucolic valley where I could truly feel the moment and almost smell the pines.</p> <p><b>David Lionheart</b>, Founder of the Non-Profit for Veterans -- playforyourfreedom.org, turns wild color schemes and tumultuous texturing into challenging imagery. With titles like <i>The Joker</i>, <i>The Cocktail Waitress</i> and <i>The Hunted</i>, Lionheart offered puzzling representations of tangible subjects through distinctly non-representational means. Another Maker of Contemporary Furniture and Accessories is <b>Ingela Noren</b>. In this instance, there was an inclination to the applied arts, as Noren applies unique design concepts and bold techniques to functional, everyday objects.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="742" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-04/james_palacios_untitled.jpeg?itok=K1dDEol8" title="james_palacios_untitled.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="750" /></article><figcaption>James Palacios, Untitled (2019), plaster, pigment + grease pencil, 96 x 96 inches</figcaption></figure><p><b>James Palacios</b>, a Cook, merged multiple cultural and emotional references in a boldly blended narrative in <i>Untitled</i> (2019). Here, two partial figures, one a seated male and the other a portrait of a female, are dually interlocked in an endless pattern of power and destabilization. Even with the obvious pain suggested here, Palacios managed to create a mesmerizing visual that kept this viewer engaged, as the artist drives home his point -- the cycle of sorrow is most often facilitated by an enabler.</p> <p><b>Jane Resnick</b>, the retired Photo Stylist, presented a large variety of wood-fired ceramic vessels expressing a range of aesthetics and forms from classic design to the more organic, and even the futuristic. All together, they formed an impressive and insightful range of quality results. <b>C. E. Williams</b>, SBM -- Creative Studio Co-Owner and Union Production Designer, displayed a challenging representation of the female form with a work form the <i>Topophilia</i> series (2017-ongoing). The subject, in repose and suspended above a segmented seating arrangement, projects confidence and stature. Conversely, the multitude of textures and transitions in black and white that give the figure volume also suggest erosion and fallibility. Think Yves Klein <i>Anthropométries</i> sans the iconic blue, but more resolved anatomically.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="741" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-04/image_6_ce_williams-topophilia.jpg?itok=3eMsmZ-u" title="image_6_ce_williams-topophilia.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1000" /></article><figcaption>C. E. Williams, Topophilia (2017), drawing no. 1, pigment on Plexiglas, 48 x 96 inches</figcaption></figure><p><b>Kai Lee</b>, SBM – Creative Studio Co-Owner and Union Production Designer, teams with the aforementioned <b>Williams</b> to repurpose various colored Plexiglas, LEDs and aluminum in the creation of <i>I Don't Know Where the Sidewalk Ends</i> (2019). Here, I experienced two alluring portals crossing, perhaps indicating the convergence or overlap of unseen dimensions. String Theorists can end up with anywhere between 10, 11, or 26 dimensions, a level of understanding that is way beyond my ability to grasp or imagine. However, the possibility of there being more than the easily perceivable dimensions we live with every day: length, width and height –- maybe throwing in space-time, is endlessly intriguing. To work with and around those mind-bending concepts, and to hint at far greater possibilities, as experienced with <i>I Don’t Know Where the Sidewalk Ends</i>, gave me and many others much to contemplate.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3935&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="ej1GjYhXwgyUPE5qYIew2l9GJHi-113D7B-AH-QrML0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 12 Apr 2020 01:14:33 +0000 Dom Lombardi 3935 at http://culturecatch.com Buddhist Sculpture Exhibit http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3930 <span>Buddhist Sculpture Exhibit</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" lang="" about="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Cullen</a></span> <span>March 21, 2020 - 19:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/871" hreflang="en">asian art</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1553" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-03/gold-boddhisatva.jpg?itok=3_qFplkL" title="gold-boddhisatva.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Standing Bodhisattva, Northern Qi Period 550-577 CE, Limestone with Gilt and Polychrome, H: 47 in.</figcaption></figure><p>Asia week gets a timely extension by appointment only at the <a href="http://www.throckmorton-nyc.com" target="_blank">Throckmorton Fine Art Gallery</a> at 145 East 57th Street, New York, NY, 10022 917-562-0188 where the <em>Transcendence From Northern Wei to Tang: Buddhist Sculpture from the Fifth-Ninth Centuries</em> will be on view through May. This show serves to provide insight into the amazing art of this period but also of the passion of gallerist Spenser Throckmorton.</p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen: </strong>How did the show originate?</p> <p><strong>Spenser Throckmorton: </strong>The answer to that question is really a story. 20 years ago, while on a visit to Hong Kong, I learned that many Buddhist sculptures had been unearthed and were being offered for sale. Ironically the sculptures were not favored at the time by Chinese collectors. This was probably due largely to the fact that the contemporary Chinese regime had an indifference towards religion. I found them extraordinary and purchased a large number of sculptures, many more than my colleagues thought prudent. I just couldn't help myself. I found them irresistible. My admiration has endured while the appreciation for the work has grown. Today Buddhist Sculptures from these periods are in many collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>You said  that your admiration has endured. Can you explain what that means?</p> <p><strong>ST:</strong> This show is my fifth exhibit of Chinese Buddhist sculpture. I have held exhibits in 2007, 2009, 2014 and 2016. Accompanying each exhibit I produced a lavishly illustrated catalog that offered essays by leading scholars of Chinese Buddhist art. For this exhibit the catalog includes an essay by Dr. Chang Qing.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>The show is clearly a passion project for you as reflected by the stunning installation. The opening of the Catalogue starts off with an essay by Dr. Qing that really is a terrific summation of the history of this art and the periods during which they were created.</p> <p>"After the spread of Buddhism to China during the Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220 CE), the Chinese began producing Buddhist imagery based on Indian prototypes but adapted to Chinese sensibilities. Over its long history in China, devotees established the foundations for Buddhism and its artistic expression during the Northern and Southern Dynasties (420-589). Buddhism and its art reached its apogee during the Tang Dynasty (618-907). From the fifth to the ninth century, Buddhist art was a primary influence on many artists, resulting in a more individualistic artistic expression after the tenth century. Most of the extant works of Chinese Buddhist art have been discovered in northern China. During the five hundred years from the fifth to the ninth century, Pingcheng, Chang'an and Luoyang held pivotal positions in the areas of Chinese politics, culture and religion. The three cities had served as either the capital of a unified empire or of a regional kingdom for a long time. Therefore, Buddhist iconography from these three areas played key roles in the development of Chinese and Buddhist art in other parts of China. In addition, many important Chinese artists produced new artistic styles, based on those transmitted from India and Central Asia. Their work, in turn, served as models influencing other regional artists to think beyond the art they produced in the three-capital region. Still, Pingcheng, Chang'an and Luoyang were central in the development of Chinese Buddhist iconography during the fifth to the ninth century."</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1553" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-03/standing-buddha.jpg?itok=ClmZf4iU" title="standing-buddha.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Standing Buddha, Northern Qi Period / Sui Period 550-618 CE, Limestone, 41 inches</figcaption></figure><p><strong>KC: </strong>Additionally the essay reveals the impact and legacy the sculptures had in China both during and after that period. Has the interest i this type of work changed in China?</p> <p><strong>ST: </strong>Ironically the Chinese government, after having long been indifferent to Buddhist imagery, prohibited in 2009 the export of early Chinese Buddha sculpture. All of the pieces in the show left China well before the ban. We owe a debt of gratitude to the unknown Buddhist monks who had the devotion, foresight and courage to bury the works to prevent their mindless destruction.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>That is yet another fascinating aspect of the show. Accompanying the sculptures is a special exhibition of photographic images from photographer and Fulbright Scholar Don Farber. Farber works to document Buddhist life internationally. Like the monks, Farber is working to ensure these Buddha images endure time. - Kathleen Cullen &amp; Michelangelo De Risi</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3930&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="Fd89L5OGLZGHCyJ48Yy4k1tvcIHeU758a61kncBktyQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 21 Mar 2020 23:02:41 +0000 Kathleen Cullen 3930 at http://culturecatch.com Inner Sanctuary http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3927 <span>Inner Sanctuary</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" lang="" about="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Cullen</a></span> <span>March 1, 2020 - 21:41</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1003" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-03/karpovas_it_flies_artsy.jpg?itok=VTbb5eyI" title="karpovas_it_flies_artsy.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>“As It Flies Away,” 2020, Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 72 inches, Photo credit: Fyodor Shiryaev</figcaption></figure><p><em>Between The No-Longer As Still-To-Come</em>: Darina Karpov</p> <p>Pierogi Gallery, NY</p> <p>Darina Karpov's artistic journey began in a communal apartment in St. Petersburg to being awarded an MFA at Yale University. Infused with color and shape we asked about her influences and direction in conjunction with her new show at the Pierogi Gallery, 155 Suffolk Street, New York, NY, 10002  <a href="mailto:info@pierogi2000.com">info@pierogi2000.com</a>. Pierogi will also be participating in the Armory Show from March 4th-8th at Booth 719 at Pier 94. Karpov describes how her beginnings fostered her artistic sensibility.</p> <p>"The communal apartments were not communes, but just shared living quarters. Most people lived as roommates -- several families per one apartment, sharing a bathroom and a kitchen. Each family had at least one room which served as a living/dining room during the day and was converted to a bedroom at night. My family was considered privileged as we 'inherited' (apartments were assigned by the government as there was no private property) the more spacious apartment than most from my great grandparents who were prominent scientists -- geologists, leading researchers at the St Petersburg Mining University. We shared with just one unrelated family, but there was also our extended family (cousins, aunts, great aunts, etc. living there. The apartment was large -- 6 bedrooms situated in the main historic square of the city overlooking the Mayor's Palace and St. Isaac's Cathedral. </p> <p>The contrast between the luxuriousness of the location and the derelict state of the apartment -- with no running hot water, leaking ceilings and cracked walls, albeit the grandeur of czarist era moldings, and detailing, is what I think really stuck with me aesthetically and comes through in my work."</p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen:</strong> In your bio we learn that you father was a geologist and you grew up in St. Petersburg in a small apt with loads of other people living there (commune style). Your mother also worked but since there was no money for a babysitter she dropped you off at the Hermitage museum. How did these life experiences impact you're work and how you saw the world? </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="582" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-03/karpovunspooling_2_artsy.jpg?itok=JAy9EKRx" title="karpovunspooling_2_artsy.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>“Unspooling II,” 2020, Ink, watercolor, graphite on paper, 26 x 55 inches Photo credit: Fyodor Shiryaev</figcaption></figure><p><strong>Darina Karpov:</strong> My father was an engineer, and my mother studied economics but ended up working as a teaching assistant at the school we went to. Once in a while when she ran errands she dropped us off at the Hermitage Museum as it was a really safe place. Traditionally the guards at the museums were pensioners, very severe old ladies, who took any opportunity to discipline my sister and I. It was a great escape to wander the grand opulent rooms of the Winter Palace and see the collections -- as a small child I especially loved the peacock room with giant mechanical peacock clock that was set in motion at the same hour every day. There were also small marble tables inlaid with semi precious stone mosaics arranged into flowers, landscapes and mythological themes. Later as a teenager I preferred to look at the northern renaissance Dutch and Flemish art. </p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>It has been said  your work is an abstract reaction to the Russia she grew up in? In the culture of the dilapidated apartment there were no boundaries and things and people flowed into each other.  In such an inward landscape or memory of growing up in Russia- what is the social narrative?</p> <p><strong>DK: </strong>I wouldn't say there were no boundaries, however there was definitely very little privacy and private space was not very respected. There was no place to hide, so I had to develop a strong sense of inner sanctuary -- a magic place. I shared a small room with my very socially active older sister. People constantly came and went, especially because we were located right on the main square. </p> <p>In my work I want to express the density and complexity and interconnectedness of relationships through time, that's why there's so much movement. I am not trying to simply represent the space I felt as a childhood memory, it's also how I always see and feel the space -- it's embodied through time. I did an <a href="https://bombmagazine.org/articles/darina-karpov/" target="_blank">interview for <em>Bomb</em> magazine</a> a few years ago where I talk about the space and movement in my work in more detail.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="869" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-03/karpovtygertygerdtl_artsy.jpg?itok=7HrQNiPa" title="karpovtygertygerdtl_artsy.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>“Tiger Tyger,” (Detail) 2019, Glaze and underglaze on porcelain, 9 x 8 x 8 inches, Photo credit: Fyodor Shiryaev</figcaption></figure><p><strong>KC: </strong>How are the childhood memories reflected in the ceramic orbs?  Is there an influence of the all-over opulent patterning of the Faberge eggs?</p> <p><strong>DK: </strong>I studied Russian miniature tempera techniques and looked at Russian folk art, especially through the lense of Russia Folk revival movement  -- World of Art (Mir Iskusstva) movement from the turn of the 20th century. I don't specifically look at Faberge eggs, but Faberge aesthetic arose in the turn of the 20th century, and I believe was also influenced by the Russian folk miniature tradition which might explain the connection.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>You did a series of drawings called "Magic Days," which were a mix of abstraction and figuration. </p> <p><strong>DK: </strong>I described it best for the press release and it applies for the "Magic Days" series as well.</p> <p>Certain objects and situations recur as if in a dream or a memory from childhood or early adolescence. These include objects strewn over the dilapidated communal apartment I grew up, scenes from abandoned, industrial parks and yards of the apartment buildings where we gathered as teenagers, Electronic equipment that my father worked with as an engineer. Many characters reappear from old sketches, culled from various sources. Even though much of my work is essentially abstract, I'm constantly drawn toward story telling, culling from cultural myths and cosmological structures which are open ended and circular. </p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>Ultimately there is a "transitional state" referred to in the press release from the drawing into clay sculpture. Are the ceramics an outlier to what she is doing on canvas.  </p> <p><strong>DK: </strong>In the last few years, I began to branch into three dimensional work, sculpting and creating reliefs in porcelain. The process emerged organically from my drawing practice. Cutting through, layering and collaging my drawings naturally led me to work in relief, eventually to build and carve porcelain clay. The need to create three dimensional objects also arose from giving birth, as if I had given birth to a new form of drawing. Working in porcelain, I work on an intimate scale, hand building the abstract, semi-figurative objects. I then carve, creating various relief patterns on the surface while the pieces are leather hard. Once they are bisque fired, I apply underglaze to cover the surface in the intricate patterns and figurations. The initial form and relief of the earlier stages echoes the drawing -- creating a dialogue and interplay between various modes of mark making.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1500" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-03/karpovmagicdays_dsc03854_artsy.jpg?itok=TDZo7LHL" title="karpovmagicdays_dsc03854_artsy.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1149" /></article><figcaption>“Magic Days,” 2019, Glaze and underglaze on porcelain, 11 x 7 x 7 inches</figcaption></figure><p><strong>KC: </strong>What are the different themes that you have developed over the years and what new influences inspired you?</p> <p><strong>DK:</strong> Movement, arrested motion, density, spatial structures in the state of formation are the recurrent overarching themes that stem from my process. Organic structures found in nature or referencing the interiority of the body, The work is always rooted in abstraction and the narrative vignettes weave in and out of it as lines of recognized lyrics in a song.</p> <p>I've been looking at a lot more Soviet-era story books, manga and anime, graphic novels, but also as I mentioned, the World of Art movement, and Silver Age women artists Olga Rozanova, Natalia Goncharova, Alexandra Exeter, Sonia Delaunay.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3927&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="sk_H3lrTu_WqqAM6t-CT3ixPll1Fz6MXm8nmHRKj0og"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 02 Mar 2020 02:41:44 +0000 Kathleen Cullen 3927 at http://culturecatch.com Muralism http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3922 <span>Muralism</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" lang="" about="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Cullen</a></span> <span>February 13, 2020 - 21:55</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/867" hreflang="en">murals</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1560" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/mural_-_79369a.jpg?itok=aE0t_Xb6" title="mural_-_79369a.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>government palace mural by Diego Rivera, photo credit Pacific &amp; Atlantic Photos Inc.</figcaption></figure><p><em>Muralism: Identity and Revolution</em></p> <p>The Throckmorton Gallery, 145 East 57th Street.</p> <p>The new show at the Throckmorton Fine Art Gallery, <em>Muralism: Identity and Revolution</em>, serves as a important companion piece to the upcoming <em>Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925-1945</em> at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The show actually documents this artistic period through photographs of both the art work and the artists. In fact the Whitney actually will be featuring photographs from the Gallerist Spencer Throckmorton's collection. We wanted to interview the gallerist to highlight both the show and the artistic period.</p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen: </strong>People are familiar with the mural work of Diego Rivera but may not know his work was part of a larger movement. Can you explain what started this movement and the subject matter?</p> <p><strong>Spenser Throckmorton: </strong>At the end of the Mexican Revolution, which historians place as happening between 1917 and 1920 there was a resurgence of Mexican art. Artists sought to reimagine the Mexican identity and focus the subject of the work on the poor, the Indian, the peasant, and the worker. This was a movement away from academic tradition which was viewed as elitist. The goal was to bring art closet to those Mexicans long marginalized. Murals were the most celebrated of the art forms and were painted all over Mexico in public sites including churches, palaces, government buildings, schools and museums.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>Who were the important artists? What themes did their work share?</p> <p><strong>ST: </strong>In addition to Diego Rivera, other artists include David Alfaro Siqueiros and José Clemente Orozco. The themes were a celebration of the lives of everyday people, the work they did and the lives they lived.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1248" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/mural-28293_1.jpg?itok=YFd4ZE0A" title="untitled-Diego Rivera by Hector Garcia" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>untitled, Diego Rivera by Hector Garcia</figcaption></figure><p><strong>KC: </strong>What role did this movement play in the culture at the time?</p> <p><strong>ST: </strong>The murals depicted a true break from the past in that the subjects featured were non-European heroes including Aztec warriors fighting the Spanish, peasants fighting for the revolution and modern day laborers building Mexico City.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>Can you describe the work in the current show and what influenced you to do this show at this time?</p> <p><strong>ST: </strong>I've always been interested in this work because the murals in Mexico is so commanding and memorable. The photos in the show are very rare as they were not printed in great amounts and they were not seen as the artwork but seen as something cataloguing they work. There are photos of murals that no longer exist and these photos are the only documents.</p> <p>Diego Rivera hired Tina Modotti, who supported herself taking pictures of artists' work, to photograph his murals so he could advertise his and get commissions. People may be familiar with his murals in Rockefeller Center that were so controversial they were later destroyed. In the United States Rivera also did murals for the Detroit Institute of Arts and the City Club in the San Francisco Stock Exchange. </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1510" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/mural-56010.jpg?itok=GCsH75JK" title="mural-56010.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>mural study: untitled (hanging laundry) by Tina Modotti</figcaption></figure><p>The show features 26 pictures by Modotti as well as other photographers with a focus on both the murals and the people in and around the movement. Modotti, who was Italian, was very familiar with this group, as, in addition to being a photographer, she was an activist for the communist party. She was actually exiled from Mexico in 1930 only to return in 1939 to live there under a pseudonym.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>What do you hope viewers will take away from the show?</p> <p><strong>ST: </strong>We hope to not only highlight this period and the work, but the show helps to both preserve and document this time in Mexico's and the art world's history. It’s also a way we connect this work to a new audience.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3922&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="O8HgWBt7Z7ls3g4tjJppUqZyVm3uRLzkr8KZvBKmOWs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 14 Feb 2020 02:55:23 +0000 Kathleen Cullen 3922 at http://culturecatch.com A Strange New Beauty http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3918 <span> A Strange New Beauty</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" lang="" about="/index.php/users/kathleen-cullen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Cullen</a></span> <span>February 8, 2020 - 10:20</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/tb_20_003l.jpg?itok=qaBCY5-n" title="tb_20_003l.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo Credit: Petzel Gallery</figcaption></figure><p>Troy Brauntuch explores the documentation of the Great German Art Exhibitions that have been compiled by GDK Research in order to expose how information can be manipulated and referenced later as truth. He accomplishes this through digital image manipulation adding elements that can reflect on our current socio-political climate. The show --  <em>A</em> <em>Strange New Beauty -- </em>is on view at the Petzel Gallery at 35 East 67th Street in New York City until March 7th. </p> <p><strong>Kathleen Cullen: </strong>You were put in the spotlight at a young age in 1977 with the <em>Pictures</em> show and have sustained a long career. Over the years much had been written about your work. Can you reflect on what has been written - not the positives and negatives? Has it impacted your work? How you deal with feedback and the press? Other areas of your life? </p> <p><strong>Troy Brauntuch: </strong>Usually when people have written on my work it has been critically positive, but I must say I remember the writings and critics that were not so kind the most. Many years ago, I had a review of an exhibition of mine that is memorable. One day, I visited the gallery and there was only one other person in the large space at the time. She looked like she was writing or sketching as she spent time in front of my artwork. It turns out she was reviewing my show for the NY times, an the review came out later that week. The review was void of most content but very descriptive of images that were not actually in the paintings. Things like schools of fish and swinging monkeys. Needless to say, not her favorite show.</p> <p><strong>KC: </strong>You have had a long career as a teacher. Is the way you teach different from the way the instructors you had taught?</p> <p><strong>TB: </strong>I was very close to, and am grateful for the teachers that I had in college. I think that the way that I was instructed is definitely in my DNA for my teaching. It was a very different time and my program felt much less academic than programs of today, but that’s why it was so special. It was a small community of faculty and students at Cal Arts in the early '70s when I was there, which made instruction intimate and generous. John Baldessari had an open seminar class that was the doorway to the art world of the day. My painting instructors had studios on campus and were always present for meetings and discussions. I played poker weekly with faculty and students as well as dean of the Music School, Leonid Hambro and Paul Brach, dean of the Art school. This was very cool and would not happen today.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="900" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/TB%2020_xxx8L.jpg?itok=eAgLjkf5" title="TB 20 xxx8L" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo Credit: Petzel Gallery</figcaption></figure><p><strong>KC: </strong>I don't know if you would agree but for most artists it's about light. Your work seems to be all about the dark (or ghost images?) What is the attraction to the palette you use?</p> <p><strong>TB: </strong>I really wanted all imagery and content to be and become very visible in this latest exhibition. I always felt during my career that if time was spent looking at my paintings, that slower and more difficult process of recognition was important to the content of the work. I specifically left glass off the framed letterpress prints so there could be no veil or refection to stop the light illuminating the metallic silver inked images. I would say light and dark co-exists equally in this exhibition as does beauty and the sublime. </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3918&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="CDLjNVgf743JSmIdaB9m3mZYfaiXFh78S2ljmZT02hw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 08 Feb 2020 15:20:26 +0000 Kathleen Cullen 3918 at http://culturecatch.com St. Petersburg 2020, and a little bit of Tampa http://culturecatch.com/index.php/node/3883 <span>St. Petersburg 2020, and a little bit of Tampa</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/index.php/user/349" lang="" about="/index.php/user/349" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dom Lombardi</a></span> <span>February 7, 2020 - 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/index.php/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="868" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/virginia-cuthbert-inner-city_1.jpg?itok=KcXdYnWl" title="virginia-cuthbert-inner-city_1.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Virginia Cuthbert (American, 1908 – 2001), Inner City Industrial Scene, 1942, oil on canvas, Museum purchase</figcaption></figure><p>One of the nice things about visiting a museum over the years is the strength and timelessness of the art displayed, as compared to how we evolve as individuals. When we change over time, we bring different references to each new experiences. As a result, our response to culture, visual art, film, music, theater, dance etc. will be transformed over time. Just think about how much your taste in music has changed in your lifetime, from the time you were a pre-teen to where you are now.</p> <p>With all this said, I return to the <b>Museum of Fine Arts, St Petersburg</b> and find new/old works to study and enjoy. Virginia Cuthbert’s <i>Inner City Industrial Scene</i> (1942) was painted shortly after she arrived in Buffalo, NY. It depicts the view from inside a street level store, looking out the front windows and glass door toward an industrial-looking swath of buildings. The somewhat geometric crumpled up paper and empty box in one window gives the viewer a sense of loss or exodus, as if a business just closed, while the scene outside, which is devoid of any people, enhances the desolate feeling of the entire location. I was immediately thinking of Charles Sheeler, a fellow <i>Precisionist</i>, who too created stunningly mesmerizing scenes like Cuthbert's to indicate a range of starkness or dread in certain aspects of 'modern life', while at the same time, getting us lost in the drama of a line/form dynamic.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1050" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/george-biddle-fletcher-martin.jpg?itok=1-Y5alBC" title="george-biddle-fletcher-martin.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="780" /></article><figcaption>George Biddle (American, 1885 – 1973), Portrait of Fletcher Martin with a German Pistol, 1943, oil on canvas, Museum purchase</figcaption></figure><p><i>Portrait of Fletcher Martin with a German Pistol </i>(1943) by George Biddle is another work that now gets my attention. As noted on the wall text, Biddle was the chairman of the <i>United States War Department’s Art Advisory Committee</i> and Martin, the subject of the painting, was on assignment for <i>Life</i> magazine. Painted when they were both in Tunisia, Biddle captures a quiet moment in an otherwise bucolic setting. The suspense comes in the form of Martin’s dark eyes that are darting to his left, as if to spy some very suspicious movement or activity outside the picture plane. Overall, the exceptionally even quality of the paint application and brushwork, and the scheme of color that emphasizes both nature and camouflage are all quite masterful.</p> <p><i>The Church at Montigny, Effect of Sunlight</i> (1908) by Francis Picabia, was painted when the artist was in his late twenties. Executed before he met the likes of Jaques Villon and Marcel Duchamp, Picabia was then influenced by the <i>Impressionists</i>. Done with rather heavy, deliberate vertical, horizontal and an occasional diagonal brushstrokes, Picabia clearly captures the time of day in pinks, blues and purples much in the same way Monet captured it in the <i>Rouen Cathedral</i> series from 1890. In the end, it is always a pleasure to see the works of a great and influential artist before they hit their more ‘well known’ period(s), when you can see their struggle to find themselves, and acceptance, in the art world.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1478" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/3._francis_picabia_french_1879_-_1953_the_church_at_montigny_effect_of_sunlight_1908.jpg?itok=w46UDiU3" title="3._francis_picabia_french_1879_-_1953_the_church_at_montigny_effect_of_sunlight_1908.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Francis Picabia (French, 1879 – 1953), The Church at Montigny, Effect of Sunlight, 1908, oil on canvas, Gift of Costas Lemonopou</figcaption></figure><p><i>A Wooded River Landscape, With a Fish Market and Fishing Boats</i> (1610) by Jan Brueghel the Elder is a brilliant work that captures the eye initially with its two-thirds bright and one-third dark composition, which is comfortably divided by a curved, ascending meridian. Once you are drawn in, you begin to see the bustling activity of this fishing village, which is immediately followed by a receding narrative -- first, in the form of two dark crimson figures on the right and left of the foreground, then to the slightly washed out, sunlit reds of a few more figures in the early mid ground, to the more faded pinkish tones of select figures in the far ground. In the end you find yourself at the proud windmill, where you realize just how carefully and surely the artist carried your gaze through the intricate depth of this vista.</p> <p>For the next few months, the Museum of Fine Arts will also feature a number of excellent exhibitions that address a wide range of interests including the <i>Ancient Theater and Cinema</i>, which correlates ancient Greek objects with stills from familiar feature films. <i>Explore the Vaults</i> is another fascinating exhibition that reveals a collection of works on walls and in modified print draws, of a number of prints and photographs that reflect the burgeoning and explorative age of Toulouse-Lautrec. On view through May 10th is <i>Art of the Stage: Picasso to Hockney</i>; and on March 14th, <i>In Full Bloom: Netherlandish Flower Paintings and Trade</i> will be open to the public.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="816" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/4._jan_brueghel_the_elder_flemish_1568_-1625_a_wooded_river_landscape_with_a_fish_market_and_fishing_boats_1610.jpg?itok=F0loJkTc" title="4._jan_brueghel_the_elder_flemish_1568_-1625_a_wooded_river_landscape_with_a_fish_market_and_fishing_boats_1610.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Jan Brueghel the Elder, (Flemish, 1568 –1625), A Wooded River Landscape with a Fish Market &amp; Fishing Boats, 1610, oil on copper</figcaption></figure><p>While I was at the <b>Morean Arts Center</b> to open a show I curated titled <i>I Am...,</i> I was able to walk through two one-person exhibitions in the adjacent galleries. The first is <i>Kirk Ke Wang: Landscape of Human Skins</i>. The term "Human Skins" is a metaphor for the used clothing seen at disaster sites. Calling his work "Social Abstraction," Wang focuses our attention on the environment as it relates to catastrophic events, as well as the migration that such tragedies create. In <i>Landscape of Human Skins -- Green Spring</i> (2017) we see a jumble of swirling representations: a fish, a bird, a section of broken chain link fencing and tree roots from a recently logged tree all hovering above what appear to be household items, and we get the immediate sensation of the suddenness of a severe storm and its aftermath.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="934" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/5._kirk_ke_wang_landscape_of_human_skins_green_spring_2017.jpg?itok=jQzkJuki" title="5._kirk_ke_wang_landscape_of_human_skins_green_spring_2017.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Kirk Ke Wang, Landscape of Human Skins, mixed media on canvas, 78 x 102 inches (photo: courtesy of the Morean Arts Center)  </figcaption></figure><p>The next solo show has the work of Perri Neri. The exhibition, <i>Perri Neri: Past Tense; Present</i>, features a number of angst-ridden, predominantly red and blue dynamic figurative paintings plus a few very detailed biomorphic drawings. Seemingly working against the clock as the artist observes the spiraling decline of humanity, Neri reveals some gut-wrenching moments when it all becomes too real and altogether overwhelming.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="729" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/6._perri_neri_bindle_2017.jpeg?itok=cUVPTazi" title="6._perri_neri_bindle_2017.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1000" /></article><figcaption>Perri Neri, Bindle (2017), graphite on Arches paper, 22 x 30 inches (photo: courtesy of the Morean Arts Center)</figcaption></figure><p>Crossing the street, my next stop is the <b>Chihuly Collection</b>. Being very familiar with the larger public installations of Dale Chihuly, and having never been to one of the museums that feature his work, I was pleasantly surprised by the many unfamiliar works. <i>Float Boat</i> (2007) consists of several 'glowing' planet like orbs that fill up and are scattered around a rowboat. The overall narrative made me think of some otherworldly, off-site area past the confines of the known universe where planets-in-wait might be held.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="900" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/7._dale_chihuly_float_boat_2007.jpg?itok=yrNz84xd" title="7._dale_chihuly_float_boat_2007.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Dale Chihuly, Float Boat (2007), gift of Bill and Hazel Hough, (photo: courtesy of the author)</figcaption></figure><p><i>Ikebana Drawing on Acrylic </i>(2010), which looks to be dripped, flung, swished and patted acrylic paint on a clear sheet of clear plastic glass that is front and back lit, brings forth the mindset of certain Modernists who favored the no-holds-barred primitive side of expression, while <i>Sliver Gilded Scarlet Piccolo Venetian with Curls</i> (2000) has just the right amount of whimsy.</p> <p>One gallery at the museum is dedicated to artists who relate in some way to glass. Currently, the duo of Jenny Pohlman and Sabrina Knowles offer <i>In the Light of Winter</i>. Their collaborations, which began some 25 years ago, culminate here in a series of works that embrace many facets of our global culture including personal stories, religion, politics and current affairs. In one instance, with <i>In the Light of Winter, Tapestry</i> (2019), the artists create something like an oversized charm bracelet with chains of glass and metal objects. I am reminded of the work of Esperanza Cortés, who created <i>I.D Bracelet</i> (2013) comprised of frescoes, amulets, glass beads, metal and chain. <i>Lodestar Portrait Series</i> (2017), the one consisting of thirteen circular portraits and birds, is the most powerful piece in the exhibition as it produces a very potent sense of sisterhood, freedom and community.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="900" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/Jenny-Pohlman-Sabrina-Knowles.jpg?itok=bKHyCdDU" title="Jenny-Pohlman-Sabrina-Knowles.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>In the Light of Winter, Tapestry (2019), blown, sculpted, mirrored, sandblasted and polished glass, metal, beads, 49 x 59 x 9 ½</figcaption></figure><p>Jenny Pohlman and Sabrina Knowles, <i>In the Light of Winter, Tapestry</i> (2019)</p> <p>There are two important exhibitions that just opened at the <b>University of South Florida's Contemporary Art Museum</b>. <i>FloodZone</i>, a solo exhibition by Anastasia Samoylova, consists of numerous large format color and black and white photographs that line the slickly colored walls of an angular gallery. This compelling installation is further enhanced by the addition of images mounted on both sides of freestanding kiosks sporadically placed throughout. My initial impression was one of a challenge, as various, and sometimes confusing messages quickly emerge. However, once engaged, the story of rising sea levels reveals the very strained relationship between "environmentalism, consumerism and the picturesque." If you have not already, after seeing this exhibition, you can not help but wonder seeing all the bustling boulevards and condo laden shorelines of the nearby area, which science-based predictors of future climate change the developers are looking at. It's nature vs. naysayers, as Samoylova brings the undeniable to the disbelievers.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="900" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/anastasia_-_instlallation.jpg?itok=EHnD-qR-" title="anastasia_-_instlallation.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo: courtesy of the author</figcaption></figure><p>Anastasia Samoylova, Installation<i> </i>view,<i> FloodZone</i>, (left to right) <i>Pink Sidewalk</i> (2017), <i>Painted Roots</i> (2017), <i>South Beach Reflection</i> (2017), <i>Green Mold</i> (2019), archival pigment prints, courtesy of the artist and Dot Fiftyone Gallery, Miami, FL.</p> <p>A second one-person exhibition is that of Hope Ginsburg. Her multi media installation is titled <i>Sponge Exchange</i>, which consists of three floating screens for video projection, an arcade-like "Coastorama dioramas" of educational discovery displays, and a side room with various photographs and paraphernalia created and accumulated during the lengthy process that lead up to the creation of this exhibition. The concept here is the exploration of "the impacts of the climate crisis on marine species." Working with USF students and professors Maxwell Parker and John Byrd, the exhibition emphasizes the role us humans can play in what amounts to something like reforestation, only this time it is happening in our seas and oceans to rebuild important and structural marine life.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="900" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2020/2020-02/hope-ginbsburg-installation.jpg?itok=du9n90_0" title="hope-ginbsburg-installation.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Hope Ginsburg, Installation view, Sponge Exchange (photo: courtesy of the author)</figcaption></figure><p>Brava Ginsburg and Samoylova for your hard work, vision and ability to shed much needed light on one of our planets most dire emergencies. Time is running out and it is efforts like these two exhibitions that builds much needed direction and hope.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3883&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="NlvM5P3F7-IiFUC8Nwy1F3nqTxZE3e9o9jtInA2dyVg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 07 Feb 2020 15:00:00 +0000 Dom Lombardi 3883 at http://culturecatch.com