Music Review

Jenny Lin: Preludes to a Revolution

Jenny LinAn intelligently constructed program, especially if it's based on a compelling concept, is almost as important to a recital album as the quality of the playing. Jenny Lin, one of the finest classical pianists in New York (and that's saying something), has a winning concept here. As Luca Sabbatini, the author of the program notes, writes, "small forms -- preludes, etudes, nocturnes, poems, character pieces, etc. --  often served their creators as a space which fairly encouraged aesthetic revolutions and other breaches of convention..." Listening to this mostly chronological program from beginning to end, one hears the piano's vocabulary expand radically over the space of 17 years.

Wayne Shorter Quartet: Beyond the Sound Barrier (Verve)

Wayne ShorterHalfway through his fifth decade in the public eye, Wayne Shorter sounds like as much of a jazz giant as ever: a superb composer and the architect of an elliptical improvisational sax style that has grown more and more influential. It's the latter facet that is emphasized on this album of concert recordings from the past three years.. The formation of a new quartet has seemingly invigorated him, and Shorter clearly inspires his younger sidemen to take risks -- Danilo Perez, John Patitucci, and Brian Blade never seemed all that progressive before, and this is their most interesting playing.

Nouvelle Vague: S/T (Luaka Bop)

Nouvelle VaguePaul Anka doing a swing album of alternative rock songs turned out to be a bad idea, because the people involved didn’t treat those songs with respect and/or understanding. Get this disk instead. Nouvelle Vague is a French band with two clever producers at the helm and rotating eight breathy-voiced female singers (supposedly picked because they were unfamiliar with the original versions); they play a series of familiar punk and new wave classics in bossa nova style. Every song remains immediately recognizable (not true on Anka’s album) and most are sung (or at times recited) quite earnestly, with the drastic exception of the Dead Kennedy’s “Too Drunk to Fuck,” which is giggled through with full awareness of its inherent sarcasm and as an expression of the protagonist’s inebriated condition.

Jack Rose: Kensington Blues (VHF)

Jack RoseHands down one of the most intricately beautiful instrumental albums of the year so far. Jack Rose (of Virginia neo-psych band Pelt) is not only a guitar virtuoso of the highest order, an adept finger-style picker in the Rev. Gary Davis/John Fahey tradition (he covers the latter’s “Sunflower River Blues”), he’s an imaginative genre-hopper who – like Fahey in his later years – can make his acoustic guitar an instrument for meditative psychedelia, even make it sound like a sitar.

Aside from the Fahey cover, all eight tracks on this solo excursion are originals, starting out in a mostly traditional vein and then, on the second half of the disc, mixing in the raga influence on alternating tracks.