Dusty Wright's Culture Catch - Smart Pop Culture, Video & Audio podcasts, Written Reviews in the Arts & Entertainment http://culturecatch.com/node/feed en Winning From the Heart http://culturecatch.com/node/3721 <span>Winning From the Heart</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/460" lang="" about="/user/460" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Cochrane</a></span> <span>June 20, 2018 - 10:00</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/node/3721" data-a2a-title="Winning From the Heart"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/441" hreflang="en">music</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/413" hreflang="en">music review</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/442" hreflang="en">Tim Arnold</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1bqJGZJkb0E?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Tim Arnold: <em>I Am For You</em> (TA Records)</p> <p>Something is happening for Tim Arnold and it isn't being bought by a huge publicity budget from a major label. He's been there done that and lost the t-shirt. An honest, simple and slowly developing vibe is catching the public's imagination via word of mouth and the sheer strength and beauty of his songs, and of one song in particular. Poverty always has been a mistress to invention and a good idea isn't reliant on cash. His latest album, a melodic sampler of emotion, longing and frustration, betrays a maturing talent that has finally arrived with a wonderful bottle of sparkling distillation to pour into the ears of the unsuspecting. Varied and sensual this is a record that won't disappoint. Integrity cannot be faked and here it shines through and effortlessly beguiles.</p> <p>Proceedings begin with a wonderful piece of taped personal history. The eleven-year old Tim is being interviewed by his mother, the actress Polly Perkins, about writing and what drives him to be creative. That it has survived for over thirty years is astonishing but it is a perfect prelude and a prediction from the past of what he would do in a future here and now that has arrived. Touchingly called "Mother's Intuition," it flows easily into the gospel tinged "Love Will Not Hurt" a searing anthem with spiritual tinges. "Anybody's Guess" is a perfect Soho 60's postcard that begs, borrows and steals from the Zombies. The Small Faces and The Beatles to emerge strongly as itself. Harmonic and up-lifting the song stays in the mind. The title track "I Am for You" is a power ballad which kicks off with the thought "If time doesn't heal, don't think, only feel" -- a sage-like sentiment that isn't always the advice one wants in a situation of emotional crisis even if it is true. Dramatic, swirling and honest with a mantra like catchiness, impressive is a word that aptly explains its power. "Crying Colours" has the ache of uplifting lamentation that mirrors the bedsitter maladies of Cat Stevens and Al Stewart "I'm crying colours / turning tears to light" is spiritual, visual and just beautiful in the saddest of ways.</p> <p>"365 Days Of Love" appears as an infectious perfectly laconic scene changer, just what is required before melancholy takes over the mood entirely, possessed with a psych pop sensibility and echoes of Paul McCartney in its deceptive lightness of touch. "Won't Fall For You" reveals a piano and guitar moodiness, the kind of song Coldplay often ruin with a mundane set of lyrics. A perfect promise of a longing lover's intentions it swirls and swoons and grows into a mini epic. "I Know By Heart" reminds me of the aching ballads of Tom McRae, a sparkling little gem that is all too swiftly over, whilst "Paris" borrows the conceit of Peter Sarstedt's "Where Do You Go To My Lovely" without the monotony. It lists all the best things that the city of art and romance promises but bows out with the line "It's what you take to Paris with you." Sometimes honesty can be clever without being smart.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-or_TSm8IEQ?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>"Change" is the piano under-pinned treasure of mood and refinement somewhere towards the end. Think Jobriath's "Inside" or the laments of Bill Fay. "The hardest goodbye I'll ever say is the one that will kill you if you walk away..." and you know Arnold means what he sings because he has lived it. The video is a stark piece of dramatic artistry. Simply the face of the legendary dancer and performance artist Lindsay Kemp portraying the words of the song in stark monochrome it is the most haunting, beautiful and profound piece of subdued eloquence. Brave and true with an unsettling element oozing from each and every frame, it isn't by any imagination's stretch a piece of standard pop fare. "Love Locked" has an upwards stride to its rock tinged drive, a radio friendly tune that should win friends and influence people and echoes the pained introspection of Jeff Buckley, a punch of need and desire with the knowing wink and confidence of a crowd pleaser.</p> <p>With "What Love Would Want" Tom Arnold reveals that he has kept the best 'til the last and that simplicity defeats complexity. It has a slow and certain, almost hidden rage that is rooted in frustration, passion and confusion:</p> <blockquote> <p>"From my door the barriers you see I never saw.</p> <p> In my mind you talk about a problem I can't find."</p> </blockquote> <p> A sheer hymn of modernity and acceptance the song that has taken on a life of its own as a project of projection and poise. Couples turn up at events to be photographed becoming a backdrop to the song's evolution. Stephen Fry and his husband appear fleetingly in the song's video. There is no barrier to the couplings, they are simply paired and in love, and of all ages. The lyrics "He is for she. She is for he, He is for he. She is for she." raises from a slow angry growl to a pained yelp for impassioned understanding. Arnold finds the world that nurtured him is under threat and he doesn't quite understand the hatred and the fear. He was raised by his mother in her same-sex relationship and her world gifted along to her son was inclusive, moral but non-judgemental on something as fundamental as sexual orientation.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/c7goTsUIx6M?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>And at the end we return to the beginning. Tim Arnold has finally answered his mother's gently probing questions about his burgeoning creativity with assurance and grace. You can't ask for more, but more is yet to come because he has stumbled upon a Pandora's Box that reaches the heart of anyone in touch with theirs, and has the songs to reach beyond his initial spark of creation to help him along the way. A song won't change the world but it will sweeten the experience of those that stop and take the time to listen. - <em>Rob Cochrane</em></p> <p><em>Mr. Cochrane is a Manchester-based poet, musician and writer. His new project </em>The James Lyons Poetry Project<em> will be released in August 2018.</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3721&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="Uqu3S3grnc6QaneAgOd5RgjPHRs94f_sQTggQABl8B0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 20 Jun 2018 14:00:00 +0000 Robert Cochrane 3721 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3721#comments Unhalfbricking http://culturecatch.com/node/3722 <span>Unhalfbricking</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/millree-hughes" lang="" about="/users/millree-hughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Millree Hughes</a></span> <span>June 19, 2018 - 22:19</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/node/3722" data-a2a-title="Unhalfbricking"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/281" hreflang="en">art</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/overall_shot_outside.jpg?itok=zFMZ6YHz" width="1200" height="663" alt="Thumbnail" title="overall_shot_outside.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Clive Murphy: <em>Random Composition Generator </em> </p> <p><a href="https://www.elijahwheatshowroom.com/" target="_blank">Elijah Wheat Showroom</a>, Bushwick, NY  </p> <p>May 19 -June 24, 2018</p> <p>Clive Murphy is a modernist, or at least he knows what one is and will give it a go even if he's not sure if it's worth it.</p> <p>He has a suite of small-scale sculptures and a larger collaborative piece at Elijah Wheat Showroom in Bushwick that lead me to think that I know how he feels about the modern world's intrusion on rural life. Like me he grew up in the middle of nowhere. He in Ireland and me in Wales. At least a "somewhere" whose lack of political heft created a particular ambiguous attitude to change. The "New" was threatening.</p> <p>There was this sense of the landscape being viewed as material to be exchanged and used without being sustained. As the memory of the War receded, progress and avarice traveled together across the countryside.</p> <p>Post -war Britain was still pushing its modernist agenda in the '60s and '70s. In '68 the English government flooded the village of Capel Celyn to create a reservoir -- Llyn Celyn -- in order to supply Liverpool and Wirral in England with water for industry. The event helped create militant wings of the Plaid Cymru nationalist party. English holiday homes were burned and low level dissension simmered until the creation of a Welsh Assembly in 2006. The relationship between the needs of the government and of the people became progressively more devastating for the Irish.</p> <p>I equate this image:</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1200" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/untittled-9_0.jpeg?itok=3o3Mfx_d" title="untittled-9.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>untitled #9</figcaption></figure><p>"Untitled (#9)" with the conflicting needs of the "at that time" new technology and those of "the auld sod."</p> <p>TV, of course, had a role in this. Forming the gobbledygook into mouth-sized dumplings. Britain had the most comprehensive world news access as a result of its overseas diplomatic and spy service. And the sense of the new technology bringing the news from around the world was most finely felt by those in the corners of the country</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1408" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/untitled_4.jpeg?itok=VFysn3ug" title="untitled_4.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>untitled #4</figcaption></figure><p>Untitled (#4)</p> <p>This sculpture, made from matchsticks, could've featured in a '70s magazine show like <em>That’s Life</em>. Showing quaint "hands on" skill in praise of the march of information. Modern artists didn't understand how their ideas would be used by those in power. Courbusier's working class flats would become the template for dirty, dangerous housing estates presided over by a massive, very unfemale Henry Moore bronze.</p> <p>Murphy adopts the persona of the naive potting shed hobbyist attempting to take on the tropes of contemporary art with matchsticks and ceiling wax.</p> <p>He has made a group of beautifully made, often hilarious sculptures that bring to mind all kinds of other art works but in the lowliest of materials. They are self consciously "small ticket" items that critique the filmic grandiosity of International Blue Chip Art by looking local and handmade. </p> <p>The centerpiece of the show is a piece that lampoons the Surrealist "Painting Machine" concept. But <em>Random Composition Generator</em> instead of revealing the subconscious through random image making argues that there is nothing of value to be said by the unconscious. It relies on the beauty of process for content. You can randomly generate an image right there in the gallery and come away with a polaroid of your "painting."</p> <p>I wont spoil it by describing it to you.</p> <p>Go there and make one!</p> <p>And anyway, small galleries like Elijah Wheat Showroom run by Carolina Wheat-Nielsen &amp; Liz Nielsen and that stage socially aware art projects should get your support.  - <em>Millree Hughes</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3722&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="qFknGImEWHIPkgAP97djFsWsVvNTPWjj5skJovooy0I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 20 Jun 2018 02:19:02 +0000 Millree Hughes 3722 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3722#comments A Simplicity Sublime http://culturecatch.com/node/3720 <span>A Simplicity Sublime</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/460" lang="" about="/user/460" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Cochrane</a></span> <span>June 19, 2018 - 10:00</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/node/3720" data-a2a-title="A Simplicity Sublime"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/441" hreflang="en">music</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/413" hreflang="en">music review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/voss-kaye-kemp.jpg?itok=bsO1zEn9" title="voss-kaye-kemp.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo credit: Giulia Zonza</figcaption></figure><p><em>What Love Would Want</em></p> <p>Lindsay Kemp, Tim Arnold &amp; Andy Fallon</p> <p>The Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, UK</p> <p>17th June 2017</p> <p>Subtitled "A Private View" on the ticket <em>What Love Would Want</em> is a majestic creation, a perfect collision of artfulness and honesty. Spread over the entire day and based upon a song of that name by Tim Arnold it is a project that has a universal directness that only requires people in love. In the afternoon they arrive to be photographed by Andy Fallon whose shots have a profound intimacy, and filmed by Tim for inclusion in a new video specific to the Manchester participants. There is no gender specific requirements, and in many cases when facing their respective partners tears are shed. From humble origins it has grown and mutated into major events in London and Toronto, and now Manchester. It will continue to evolve because it is a limitless, endless task, a project that could take root and flourish anywhere. There is a 1960's optimism to its ethos, but it isn't mawkish or twee. Its roots are what makes us tick, get up in the morning and cross continents for that basic need for, and to see another person. The portraits speak of that great intangible emotion and tenderly exposes the subjects and their needs.</p> <p>The work of the afternoon over, the evening begins with Tim Arnold singing his song. A man alone on a huge stage with touching epic ballad with the most non-judgemental simplicity. "He for She. She for He? He for He? She for She?" and on the screen behind him the portraits of the day flash by. He then performs it again but this time with pianist Emmanuel Vass whose technique lifts and swirls with refined classicism, as the Manchester Lesbian and Gay Chorus elevate the proceedings to near monumental pathos. It is all being recorded and filmed so a second take is required but by this point the audience is transfixed and transported and are only too glad to have a third hearing.</p> <p>Then comes the fourth rendition and this is where a touch of genius arrives and soars in expressive grace in the form of the performance artist and dancer, and early mentor of David Bowie and Kate Bush, Lindsay Kemp. Resplendent in all white costume and face make-up he resembles a Kabuki androgyne with outstretched elongated arms he glides and smoothly contorts becoming the sentiment implicit in the song. As the lights change he is a golden figure of a gracefulness divine, an astonishing feat for an eighty year old and the nearest thing to exquisite I have witnessed in a long while. All too soon the song has ended and Kemp dissolves into the darkness and a moment of pure magic has flown.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/steve-kemp.jpg?itok=DrKomIyY" title="steve-kemp.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo credit: Steve Iggulden</figcaption></figure><p>Afterwards there is a "Question and Answer" session. Kemp is a walking anecdotal treasure trove. From performing <em>Salome</em> bedecked in toilet roll as there was a shortage of veils at his boarding school, a caper that nearly saw him expelled, or doing his cabaret routine half a century ago between bouts at a wrestling match in Manchester he could do an <em>Evening With</em> no problem. His right eye-brow should really have it's own Equity Card as it raises above a symphony of glances and pursed pouts. Tim Arnold speaks movingly about being brought up by his lesbian mothers and about wanting to sing <a href="https://youtu.be/c7goTsUIx6M">"What Love Would Want"</a> at the Chechen border, a country that has gulags for gay people, before he is advised by the actor Stephen Fry that such an act will likely see him shot on sight.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/c7goTsUIx6M?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>And so it ends with huge bunches of flowers for the participants, but these are immediately dwarfed by an enormous bouquet, a mini hedgerow of blooms that is presented to Lindsay Kemp who is momentarily startled. They are from his former pupil and collaborator Kate Bush. He does a brief mime of delight. A perfect ending, and one that couldn't be scripted in a night that briefly gives us hope about ourselves and the power of love. As soon as I step through the doors of the Bridgewater Hall I am immediately accosted by a homeless man and the bubble almost burst as it sometimes does. I gave him my change and he was full of thanks, so the love of the evening crept into the night for someone who hadn't been there, but required just a little of its continuing love. -<em> Rob Cochrane</em></p> <p><em>Mr. Cochrane is a Manchester-based poet, musician and writer. His new project </em>The James Lyons Poetry Project<em> will be released in August 2018.</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3720&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="lzSAFRP80BR254oR3_R7FdwS9ntZr3L5WGQVzExAsZw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 19 Jun 2018 14:00:00 +0000 Robert Cochrane 3720 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3720#comments Quote of the Week: Chet Atkins http://culturecatch.com/qotw/chet_atkins <span>Quote of the Week: Chet Atkins</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/david-ashdown" lang="" about="/users/david-ashdown" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dave Ashdown</a></span> <span>June 19, 2018 - 10:00</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/qotw/chet_atkins" data-a2a-title="Quote of the Week: Chet Atkins"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/QOTW" hreflang="en">Quote of the Week</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/356" hreflang="en">Chet Atkins</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/357" hreflang="en">guitarist</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/358" hreflang="en">country music</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rltEI9PA5yo?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>"Years from now, after I'm gone, someone will listen to what I've done and know I was here. They may not know or care who I was, but they'll hear my guitars speaking for me."</p> <p><strong>Chet Atkins </strong>(20 June 1924 - 30 June 2001), influential guitarist and record producer.</p> <!--break--></div> <section> </section> Tue, 19 Jun 2018 14:00:00 +0000 Dave Ashdown 419 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/qotw/chet_atkins#comments Bare Trees & Second Chances http://culturecatch.com/node/3717 <span>Bare Trees &amp; Second Chances</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/460" lang="" about="/user/460" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Cochrane</a></span> <span>June 18, 2018 - 10:00</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/node/3717" data-a2a-title="Bare Trees &amp; Second Chances"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/426" hreflang="en">Danny Kirwin</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/144" hreflang="en">obituary</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/427" hreflang="en">Fleetwood Mac</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fSJrGxH9Ni8?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Fleetwood Mac founder, Peter Green first saw Brixton-born Danny Kirwan at the age of seventeen playing with his band Boilerhouse, and invited him to join him as an expressly talented teenager. Early on he composed "Jig-Saw Puzzle Blues" the B-side of the world-wide smash "Albatross" to which Kirwan can be heard adeptly contributing his delicate licks to. When a burnt out Green left in 1970 it was Kirwan and fellow band member Jeremy Spencer who steered the group into a more acoustic, less bluesy field, setting the tone for their later phenomenal success. They'd formed a healthy collaborative partnership whilst working on Spencer's solo album</p> <p><em>Kiln House </em>(1970), <em>Future Games </em>(1971), and <em>Bare Trees</em> (1972) remain stunning achievements from a period of transition and turmoil. Kirwan wrote half of the songs on that trio of million selling albums but alcohol got the better of the young guitarist, and a possible acid trip misadventure in Munich with Green may have also played a part in the destruction of his tenure with the group. He was fired mid-tour in in the US in 1972. Kirwan and Bob Welch had never been compatible as members of the same outfit, but when Kirwan refused to take the stage and smashed his Les Paul to pieces, heckling the others from the wings, Mick Fleetwood effectively fired him in what he saw as a virtual act of mercy to his troubled friend.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1Jkp34jMeEw?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Back in London, and after a period of reflection, Kirwan emerged again via a new recording deal with DJM Records who released his first solo outing <em>Second Chapter</em> -- a beautiful and mellow affair with echoes of Nick Drake and Paul McCartney -- to favorable reviews in 1974. His refusal to tour limited the possibility of wider success, and this impeded the next album <em>Late Night In San Juan</em> a less accomplished effort a few years later. His cover version of the Beatles' "Let It Be" was given a reggae twist and though released as a single in the States, despite airplay didn't chart. His third and final album <em>Hello There Big Boy</em> was a tortured and tortuous affair. Kirwan looked haunted on the cover shots and the music was overblown and worse still utterly uninspiring. </p> <p>Over seventy musicians were involved in its making, and the affair has been described by its producer Clifford Davies as "so bad." Reportedly Kirwan had recorded his efforts with his back turned on his collaborators. Then came the decades of a musical silence that he never broke, the years of the homelessness, mental health issues, and alcoholism. He was a regular user of St. Mungo's Hostel in Central London, but although he was reported to have a guitar in his room, encounters with him reported a disheveled and largely reclusive presence.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/B0mUNqlYvYk?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Danny Kirwan was inducted into the Rock Hall Of Fame in 1998. Needless to say he did not attend but was aware of the honor. The year 2000 saw the release of <em>Ram Jam City</em> a stylish and reflective collection of demos from the time of <em>Second Chapter</em> and that album appeared on CD in Germany and Japan, as have his other two solo outings. His story is the perfectly imperfect rock and roll fable. He was an anthem for a doomed youth, a poster boy of mellow wistfulness with an angelic face and talent to burn. </p> <p>Huge success, incredible and dextrous ability and then forty years of silence. He married briefly and fathered a son. No cause of death has been given, but like Bowie sang in "The Man Who Sold The World" the creative spark of Daniel David Kirwan "died a long, long time ago." -<em> Rob Cochrane</em></p> <p><em>Mr. Cochrane is a Manchester-based poet, musician and writer. His new project </em>The James Lyons Poetry Project<em> will be released in August 2018.</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3717&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="ae-LFYe4dyiMlb64vBZYNrPJe0cJWeHgmbkWLgHpgdw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 18 Jun 2018 14:00:00 +0000 Robert Cochrane 3717 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3717#comments Beyond The Surreal http://culturecatch.com/node/3716 <span>Beyond The Surreal</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/maryhrbacek" lang="" about="/users/maryhrbacek" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Hrbacek</a></span> <span>June 17, 2018 - 10:00</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/node/3716" data-a2a-title="Beyond The Surreal"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/420" hreflang="en">Giacometti</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/421" hreflang="en">Guggenheim Museum</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/281" hreflang="en">art</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/62" hreflang="en">art review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/giacometti_dog.png?itok=5ti6dBw2" width="1200" height="802" alt="Thumbnail" title="giacometti_dog.png" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Giacometti</p> <p><a href="https://www.guggenheim.org" target="_blank">Guggenheim Museum</a>, NYC</p> <p>June 8 - September 12, 2018</p> <p>The meticulously curated Giacometti exhibition on view at the Guggenheim Museum spans the artist's early years during his involvement with the Surrealist group (1920s) through his later period when he became associated with the French Existentialist movement in the 1940s.  The exhibition is organized by Megan Fontanella, Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Catherine Grenier, Director, Fondation Giacometti, Mathilde Lecuyer-Maillé, Associate Curator, Fondation Giacometti, and Samantha Small, Curatorial Assistant, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.</p> <p>Alberto Giacometti is thought in many quarters to be the epitome of what has come to be considered a "fine artist."  His practice is highly focused and selective, extremely decisive yet open to the messages his subjects transmitted to him.  One might infer, based on the intensity and angst of his art, that Giacometti was a loner, someone who was prey to anxiety and strain; yet in fact it seems the he was socially connected with friends he saw regularly, he was a married man, and he was an artist who worked diligently in his studio, often into the depths of the night, habitually from a model.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/giacometti_walkingman.png?itok=7QsaGj6y" width="1200" height="1948" alt="Thumbnail" title="giacometti_walkingman.png" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>That Giacometti's art is unique and insightful is well established; he gained inspiration from the art of Oceania, Egyptian art, Cycladic art and the art of Africa.  It is possible that he was inspired by the physical stature of the Watutsi tribe of Africa that bears a strong resemblance to the artist's fragile, slender "walking" and "standing" man images.  His bond with Egyptian art brings a special emphasis and spirit of the divine to his artwork.  His "Standing Man" bronzes, attenuated into apparently tormented refashioned forms, appear free of all but vital, enduring elongated spirit.  An inventive diversity of scale plays an important part in his art; some of the heads are very small, bordering on the minute, while other standing figures, legs fused into one form, present themselves as much more statuesque than their actual height implies.  The power of the pale plaster pieces is relatively diluted compared with the impact of the regal black bronze works.  The artist was drawn to the teeming energy generated in city squares; his figures walking through plazas seem optimistic and purposeful as they pass close by one another, free of distracting concerns of the moment.  Giacometti's compelling series of maimed broken busts, with forms cut at the shoulders, all have heads that resemble regenerated tribesmen who have endured the ordeal of a rite of passage.  With some exceptions, Giacometti's art encapsulates the post-war era of fear, in which the planet was threatened by the prospect of a nuclear holocaust.</p> <p>The revealing documentary film on view, by Ernst Scheidegger, features Giacometti in his studio as he works from a model before public scrutiny; his art revolves ostensibly around the theme of visual perception.  In his practice he tries adamantly to reproduce the entire subject faithfully, but the more scrutinizing he becomes, the more impossible it is for him to capture the figure in its entirety, true to its visual scale.  The torso may become massive in relation to a head, which has become increasingly flat in front but wide to the side.  He works obsessively with the goal of total truth in the rendering of his models. Through his probing, deliberate and searing search for perceptual authenticity, he finds a working method that enables him to achieve a result that replicates the process of the strengthening of the spirit that is at the core of earthly existence.</p> <p>Giacometti's genuine subjects are bodily pain and endurance.  The artist requires absolute stillness from his sitters, sometimes for five hours at a stretch, in a working mode whose fierceness seems to become an integral part of the final artwork, as he searches for something beyond physical matter.  The film discloses that he feels the eyes to be the only aspect of the model that truly speaks of reality and are as such the dominating part of the subject's personality.  The artist seeks something well beyond a resemblance; he is after universality common to all humankind.  This universality comprises the need in life to endure pain and suffering, but to bear it as part of the higher plan.  Some believe that our human spirits are honed by hardship in readiness to meet our maker in life’s non-physical phase of existence.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/gen-press_giacometti_caroline.png?itok=Vnr2GQG7" width="1200" height="1696" alt="Thumbnail" title="gen-press_giacometti_caroline.png" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Giacometti puts his materials, his clay, through tremendous paces (as seen in the film) by reworking and remodeling the shapes and contours, cutting repeatedly into the grooves and curves to make the energetic marks reach deep into the soft clay to bring the forms to their essence.  He impersonates God in his studio, capturing in the expressions of his models' faces the aches and physical tension of endurance that sharpen and strengthen the spirit.  Often the discomfort that the models' features exude supersedes the appearance of their physical traits, so that all his models have a similar attitude and energetic dispersion of their pain and perseverance.</p> <p>Giacometti reproduces the sculptural stance of the Egyptian god kings by melding his statues' legs and feet into one form, infusing an aura of the divine in his standing figures.  He prepares his material, reworking his sculptures, as one can perhaps imagine the priests within the innermost chamber of the pyramids prepared the pharaoh’s body for its ultimate transcendence to the afterlife.   </p> <p>The artist's connection with the Existentialists (he was a friend of Jean Paul Sartre) brought a heightened awareness that humans exist on the edge of belief, shifting from being into a lack of being, or a void of nothingness.  He sought in his work to counter this void by extracting from his model the essential battered, shattered individual spirit, refashioning it in clay to its tormented but new form.</p> <p>The exhibition is admirably curated, providing spare informative wall texts that do not convey overly esoteric content.  It is focused, clear and comprehensible to the informed public at large, placing this art in a transparent context.  The show brings to light the surprising information that this ambitious yet humble man believed he was never able to accurately achieve his intensions in his work.  To consider "deconstructing" an artist of such a specific and personal focus would be not only inflated, it would be an act of undue hubris.  This exhibition demonstrates the authentic expressions of a totally honest, profoundly driven 20<sup>th</sup> century icon of anxiety and truth. - <em>Mary Hrbacek</em></p> <p><em>Ms. Hrbacek is a member of AICA-USA (International Association of Art Critics) and has been writing reviews of NY art exhibitions since 1999. She has covered shows in almost every museum in town.</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3716&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="LDfg6EX9lQ1_4KZ4RXnk9RhnYAPgjodUJfVoLDqos84"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 17 Jun 2018 14:00:00 +0000 Mary Hrbacek 3716 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3716#comments Puppets Unite! http://culturecatch.com/node/3714 <span>Puppets Unite!</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/leah-richards" lang="" about="/users/leah-richards" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Leah Richards</a></span> <span>June 14, 2018 - 07:00</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/node/3714" data-a2a-title="Puppets Unite!"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/theater" hreflang="en">Theater Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/364" hreflang="en">Manufacturing Mischief</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/365" hreflang="en">Pedro Reyes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/366" hreflang="en">Paul Hufker</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/367" hreflang="en">At The Tank</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/manufacturing_mischief.jpg?itok=dJL-EFzK" title="manufacturing_mischief.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo credit: Sham Sthankiya</figcaption></figure><p><i>Manufacturing Mischief</i> </p> <p>Created by Pedro Reyes &amp; written by Paul Hufker, Directed by Meghan Finn </p> <p>At The Tank, NYC June 5-24, 2018</p> <p>Have you realized that what your life is really missing is a puppet-Karl Marx struggling to burst out of a cake topped with a hammer and sickle? If so, you'll be happy to know that you can fill that particular existential hole with the New York premiere of <i>Manufacturing Mischief</i>. Conceived by Mexico City-based artist, activist, and educator Pedro Reyes, this comedy is currently serving up some all-puppet satire at The Tank, a multidisciplinary non-profit that fosters emerging artists and works to remove some of the economic barriers to the development of new work. <i>Manufacturing Mischief </i>takes aim at targets from toxic masculinity to our would-be technocratic overlords while maintaining a spirit of steadfast and endearing silliness.</p> <p>At the outset of the play, polymath intellectual Noam Chomsky arrives, at the behest of an anonymous invitation, at the "Elite Expo," an event brought to you, a title card tells us, by SpaceX and other dark forces of the underworld. Chomsky (who, according to a New York Times interview with Reyes, both lent approval to his appearance in puppet form and suggested the inclusion of Marxist theorist and activist Rosa Luxemburg, of whom Reyes happened already to have a puppet), it turns out, has been solicited to attend in order to judge an invention contest -- specifically the category of devices that could either help or kill us all, a category whose apocalyptic undertones he does not fail to note. It further turns out that Millie Persistington, ardent feminist and one of his top students, has entered a device in the contest: the Print-a-Friend. To operate the Print-a-Friend, one inserts a book and out springs a copy of the person who wrote it. Behind the Expo are Steve Jobs, who has uploaded his consciousness into the cloud like a <i>Westworld </i>character, and Elon Musk, that purveyor of promises of civilian space travel, hyperloop transportation, and self-driving cars, with side interests in short-range flamethrowers and attacking the legitimacy of the media. Millie envisioned the device reproducing "great thinkers," but Musk instead prints Ayn Rand. He later makes off with the machine at the urging of Rand, who wants to summon more one-percenter capitalists (think William Randolph Hearst), and, well, mischief ensues. This mischief includes the generation of Tiny Trump (the Commander-in-MisChief?), who is assertively <i>not</i> begotten from a book; showdowns at a Wendy's and an immigrant detention center; and Rand being tripped up by both her own hypocrisy and a surprise fabrication from the Print-a-Friend.</p> <p>The play makes its themes very clear: Chomsky argues with Musk, his villainous antagonist, that unchecked technological development is not inherently good in itself, citing the good intentions behind the invention of Zyklon B and Sarin as pesticides. Later, Karl Marx dresses up to rap about the dangers of A.I. and automation. Marx's is not the only song among the snappy, self-aware dialogue, up-to-the-minute jokes, and outstanding design of the puppets (brought to life by Victor Ayala, Mery Cheung, Julia Darden, Christine Schisano, and Christina Stone). The production is as willing to make jokes about Russian hooker pee as it is about linguistics, giving it a feel something like an exceptionally nerdy and historically knowledgeable episode of <i>South Park</i>. It ending suggests that even the most progressive among us are not immune to the lures of the narcissistic American cultural stew of capitalism, technology, and celebrity culture, and it pairs that suggestion with a blunt reminder that on this November 6, we can still affect where our nation is headed. - <em>Leah Richards</em> &amp; <em>John Ziegler</em> </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3714&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="z5jTmcyVJonIo1gJNVnEHx_iQHptjJrhaxUiiXQgIWg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 14 Jun 2018 11:00:00 +0000 Leah Richards 3714 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3714#comments Industry City Meets M. C. Escher http://culturecatch.com/node/3713 <span>Industry City Meets M. C. Escher</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/349" lang="" about="/user/349" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ddlombardi</a></span> <span>June 13, 2018 - 11:04</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/node/3713" data-a2a-title="Industry City Meets M. C. Escher"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/354" hreflang="en">M.C. Escher</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/281" hreflang="en">art</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/359" hreflang="en">artist</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1203" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/relativity.jpg?itok=sTR1EGWK" title="relativity.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>M. C. Escher, Relativity, Lithograph, Private Collection, Usa, All M. C. Escher Works @ 2018 The M. C. Escher Company.</figcaption></figure><p>M. C. Escher (1898-1972) has been a favorite of mine since the 1960s when that decade's psychedelic, counter-culture mindset saw common ground in his transformative work. Escher’s art made it possible for all of us to see the impossible, to experience dimensions of space and time that were previously unimaginable. He combined math, architecture and science with a unique aesthetic in viewing the world around him, as it all coalesced in his brilliant mind resulting in the creation of a good number of incredibly iconic images.</p> <p>I was lucky enough to have visited galleries in SoHo as a young man in the early to mid 1970s when the Vorpal Gallery on West Broadway held a handful of Escher exhibitions. Just beginning my journey as a fine artist, I was fortunate to have seen his brilliance at a time when I had such a great need for seeing anything and everything profoundly intriguing, wildly enlightening and fully thought provoking and Escher's art fit those categories perfectly.</p> <p>So here I am, almost 45 years later in an adjacent borough in Industry City Brooklyn, where I find myself at the press preview of <i><a href="http://www.arthemisia.it/en/escher-nyc-2/" target="_blank">Escher: The Exhibition &amp; Experience</a> </i>thanks to my correspondence with fellow art industry professional, Loredana Amenta. The exhibition, which winds through a number of adjoining rooms is beautifully installed and perfectly lit to maximize the experience of seeing such a vast array of the master's work. Curators Mark Veldhuysen and Federico Giudiceandrea, working with Italy's premiere elite exhibition producer Arthemisia and Architect Corrado Anselmi the exhibition comes alive with interactive and participatory highlights that get visitors right into the middle of the mindset.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1771" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/hand_with_reflecting_sphere.jpg?itok=T-hsS6zd" title="hand_with_reflecting_sphere.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>M. C. Escher, Hand with Reflecting Sphere, Lithograph, Private Collection, USA, All M. C. Escher Works @ 2018</figcaption></figure><p>Most successful is the clear and intuitive timeline used that includes Escher's most famous mind-bending works such as <i>Drawing Hands</i> (1948); <i>Metamorphosis II</i> (1939-40), a woodcut that took 20 blocks to produce this miraculous mix of patterns and transitions across a span of over 12 ½ feet; the hauntingly precise <i>Eye</i> (1946); <i>Relativity</i> (1953), along with similar works represented here that have influenced many artists since, including the makers of the feature film <i>Inception</i> (2010); the mesmerizingly beautiful <i>Three Worlds</i> (1955); and perhaps his best known work <i>Hand with Reflecting Sphere</i> (1935), which is accompanied by an interactive installation where visitors can see themselves in the same composition.</p> <p>But don't get me wrong, this noble effort and installation is not just Escher's greatest hits. This exhibition is a fully realized; an all-inclusive retrospective featuring everything from his early stunners such as <i>The Second Day of Creation (The Division of the Waters)</i> (1925), where you can feel the cold conundrum of a violent sea being ravaged by rain; to <i>Print Gallery</i> (1956), where Escher himself could not solve the center of this twisting composition. There are preliminary sketches where he is working out his composition and the woodblocks themselves, where you can see just how, why and where he made his incredibly precise cuts. I could go on and on, but my best advice is not to miss this most important exhibition. We all need some time to get away from the day-to-day politics and general upheaval on all sides and get our sense of wonder back and this is the place. - <em>D. Dominick Lombardi</em></p> <p><i>Escher: The Exhibition &amp; Experience</i> is located at <a href="https://industrycity.com/" target="_blank">Industry City</a>, 34 34<font size="2">th</font> Street, Building 6, Brooklyn, NY.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3713&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="qyNizuQBMlchExfNvm26U1Gq7Fv9PsgypCi_VVRqMug"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 13 Jun 2018 15:04:58 +0000 ddlombardi 3713 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3713#comments Quote of the Week: Annie Leibovitz http://culturecatch.com/QOTW/annie-leibovitz <span>Quote of the Week: Annie Leibovitz</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/david-ashdown" lang="" about="/users/david-ashdown" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dave Ashdown</a></span> <span>June 13, 2018 - 10:00</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/QOTW/annie-leibovitz" data-a2a-title="Quote of the Week: Annie Leibovitz"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/QOTW" hreflang="en">Quote of the Week</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/327" hreflang="en">Annie Leibovitz</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/66" hreflang="en">quote</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/328" hreflang="en">quote of the week</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/224" hreflang="en">Culture Catch</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">dusty wright</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/annie-leibovitz.jpg?itok=jINygVzd" width="741" height="864" alt="Thumbnail" title="annie-leibovitz.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>"When I say I want to photograph someone, what it really means is that I'd like to know them. Anyone I know I photograph."</p> <p><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annie_Leibovitz" target="_blank">Annie Leibovitz</a> (2 October 1949), noted American portrait photographer.<br /><!--break--></p> </div> <section> </section> Wed, 13 Jun 2018 14:00:00 +0000 Dave Ashdown 488 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/QOTW/annie-leibovitz#comments Little Q + A: Carroll Dunham: Millree Hughes x Dennis Kardon x Bradley Rubenstein http://culturecatch.com/node/3710 <span>Little Q + A: Carroll Dunham: Millree Hughes x Dennis Kardon x Bradley Rubenstein</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>June 12, 2018 - 10:00</span> <span class="a2a_kit a2a_kit_size_32 addtoany_list" data-a2a-url="http://culturecatch.com/node/3710" data-a2a-title="Little Q + A: Carroll Dunham: Millree Hughes x Dennis Kardon x Bradley Rubenstein"><a class="a2a_button_whatsapp"></a><a class="a2a_button_facebook"></a><a class="a2a_button_twitter"></a><a class="a2a_button_email"></a></span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/307" hreflang="en">Carroll Dunham</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/308" hreflang="en">Gladstone Gallery</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/267" hreflang="en">NYC</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/281" hreflang="en">art</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/62" hreflang="en">art review</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/309" hreflang="en">Bradley Rubenstein</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/310" hreflang="en">Millree Hughes</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">dusty wright</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/224" hreflang="en">Culture Catch</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/cd_bgg2018_install_12_e_0.jpg?itok=Hp7JjOfF" width="1200" height="838" alt="Thumbnail" title="cd_bgg2018_install_12_e.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Carroll Dunham, <a href="https://gladstonegallery.com/" target="_blank" title="Gladstone Gallery, NYC">Gladstone Gallery</a>, NYC | April 20-June 16, 2018</p> <blockquote> <p>"<i>Sailors fighting in the dance hall<br /> Oh man, look at those cavemen go<br /> It's the freakiest show." </i>David Bowie</p> </blockquote> <p><b>Millree Hughes:</b> What is it? How do I know it's good? In the old days the paper would tell you, the TV would tell you. If it was cultural there was one station that specifically dealt with that Now, unfortunately, it is hard to tell. There are too many voices vying for your attention. Which one is trustworthy? If you are an artist or a musician, an actor, or a writer, you can use your judgement. But if you're not, how can you tell, for example, if a painting is worth looking at?</p> <p>Carroll Dunham has never been willing to talk about what his pistol-penis packing Puritans or his funky female figures are actually about. He has only ever talked about his work formally and how it relates to Art history. How his female figures relate to Cezanne's bathers for example. But I found myself at his last show asking: "Can we talk about the assholes?".</p> <p>This time is no different. Painted in 2017 they are not necessarily about the American election. Despite that many of the paintings are of two cavemen with bushy manes and floppy dicks battling it out in the woods. I see the wrestling figures from Poussin's <i>Rape of the Sabine Women</i> of 1612 and something of the simplicity and figural dynamism of Picasso's <i>Figures on the Beach</i> of 1931. Dunham creates a great, in the middle, in your grill, physicality. He has stripped the figure back to grubby white canvas contained by a thick black line.  There's a tree green and a sky blue.  But after that there’s not much left on your plate to eat, other than the meat and two veg.</p> <p><b>Bradley Rubenstein:</b> That flora and fauna are crucial here. He has painted those with a different hand, they seem more layered on a la David Salle's work than actually part of the scene. And that dog is such weird combination of kitsch cuteness, and a schoolboy reference to dog’s licking their balls. It is that combination we saw with his last show at Gladstone, a Lady Godiva on a horse. There was a series of working drawings that rendered the scene over and over, until gradually you had a childlike drawing, a sort of set of notes on regression therapy, or the kind of children’s drawings of nude family members where the parent is like, "Do I need to worry about this?"</p> <p>But there is humor here that is both course and refined at the same time. There is a dyptich, or two variations on a theme, of a rear view shot of testicles and anus. In one the anus is on top, in the second, it is balls up. One the one hand it is an almost Picasso-like abstraction, integrating the body into the landscape, like in his late paintings. On the other hand it reminds me of an old Joan Rivers joke:</p> <blockquote> <p>"So I am in bed last night and my husband says, 'Joan, your box is too tight and your ass is too loose.' And I say, 'Edgar get off my back.'"</p> </blockquote> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/cd1456_framed_0.jpg?itok=cicOYLRM" width="1200" height="1329" alt="Thumbnail" title="cd1456_framed.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><b>MH:</b> American artists frequently tell you that what you are looking at it is not what they meant you to see. Chuck Close claims that his work is about the formal language of painting. He's just been practicing on what is closest to him. They just happened to be the famous artists of the day. Vanessa Beecroft exhibited a room full of beautiful naked women in Prada heels but only ever talked about them as if they were objects. Jeff Koons is particularly good at pinning some glorious "advert bullshit" to his masthead. It's about desire! It's about beauty! Anything other than what you are actually looking at.</p> <p><b>BR:</b> There is something about Dunham's nudes that kind of seem timely now. There are younger artists who deal with the same ideas but in some cases their simple act of painting the nude is political. Noomi Roomi, a Moscow artist said: </p> <blockquote> <p>"If we will look back at ancient Greece for example, where homosexuality was common, we'll notice how inspirational was male's body for artists of that time. They depicted both female's and male's beauty because they didn't have any non-hetero taboos, they were opened to both genders.  I guess, the problem of not drawing bodies in sexual context can be seen as that we still have this fear, we still perceive male's nudity as something 'gay.'  Also, women do reflect on themselves -- maybe that's why they paint female's bodies more often, although I don't understand why modern female artists don't explore the male as much. But, it should be noted that my art was never exhibited in galleries or on festivals in Russia because no one dared exhibit them. I only got positive responses from Russian audiences, but never got any permission to show my works publicly. Also, I was rejected when I wanted to print my books in Moscow, because my art was seen as dangerous, prohibited… people are clearly afraid."</p> </blockquote> <p><b>Dennis Kardon:</b> Dunham's new paintings are sexual, but not homosexual. They are very much about a white straight guy trying to come to terms with his attitude towards male bodies, starting with his own, as expressed by the fact that the two figures are almost the same, so I assume they are aspects of himself in turmoil, or at least wrestling with the idea of his maleness. In the last two shows, one of which I reviewed for <em>Art in America</em>, the female body was seen as an <i>other</i>, or as a muse, and always depicted alone, so I guess accessible to artist/viewer. The paintings of trees on the other hand seemed a stand in for the male body. And they still have a formal metonymy with cocks and balls.</p> <p>The history of body depictions in Western painting is usually that women's bodies are objects of desire and men's bodies are objects of torture or competition, with the exception of Caravaggio or David. Manet's <em>Jesus Mocked by the Soldiers</em> is a great example of the different male attitudes of masculinity. In Dunham the wrestlers do not touch each other erotically, though there is a certain tenderness expressed that is just short of a caress. Penises are never erect or semi-erect.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-06/cd_bgg2018_install_12_e_0.jpg?itok=Hp7JjOfF" width="1200" height="838" alt="Thumbnail" title="cd_bgg2018_install_12_e.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>The abundance of assholes, feels to be about fear of penetration, and dominance. I keep waiting for one of the wrestlers to stick a club in one. When a lone male is lying down, the painting is titled <i>Left for Dead</i>, which is telling, as if abandonment is the issue, and the competition is not innocent. I did find it interesting that he eroticized men's nipples, making them erect and pink, and pretty much the way he paints women's nipples.</p> <p><b>MH:</b> Why are American artists so evasive about content? Why do they put something right in your face and then pretend that they don't see. The separation between content and intent that is endemic to really successful American art begins when it leaves the studio. The galleries attempt to legitimize the art. If the painting is worth a lot of money It must be on a continuum with everything else that rich people buy. It needs to be placed in history. Something is good because its like something else that has already proved itself.</p> <p><b>DK:</b> I disagree with your idea about content as a visual narrative that a painter should verbally address. Content occurs in the ambiguity that a painter establishes, and is something that viewers could address verbally, but it is not the business of a painter to spoil for viewers. So instead painters address their physical actions in the creating of the painting, or even the feelings that that might arise, which is why the formal structure is safe to talk about. I think artists today talk way too much about content or subject matter in their work which should be left to a viewer to try to come to terms with.</p> <p><b>BR:</b> The last thing I want to bring up is that Dunham is dealing with depictions of sex, and in an odd way with the sexuality of painting. I like what Mira Schor wrote:</p> <blockquote> <p>"I would lay claim both to being polymorphously perverse, because after all why shouldn’t painting benefit from the input of more than one sense, and also to having the very same body part, connecting my optic nerve and my hand to my sexuality, especially if sexuality is defined as not just the province of genital intercourse but as a profound life/death drive. It is in fact precisely this intersection of visuality, sexuality, and manual impulse that makes me a painter. And I would add something left out of this particular biological theory, that is, the connection of optic nerve, sexuality, and hand to intellect."</p> </blockquote> <p>I think there is something of late Picasso in Dunham's work. That acting out or recreating sexual encounters on canvas.</p> <p><b>DK:</b> The day Dunham really ups the ante will be the day when one of those guys is black, and I will be interested in how he will depict <i>his</i> dick. All the people in Dunham's recent paintings are as white as can be; the white of the primed canvas.</p> <p><b>MH:</b> So stop focusing on the cocks, the pussies and the assholes they are in Dunham's work to get the punters in the door. Once they are there they should be looking at how the paintings are made and what other artists they refer to… right?</p> <p><b>BR:</b> Yeah, "boys keep swinging, boys always work it out!"</p> <p><em>Mr. Rubenstein is NYC-based painter, story teller, and smart culture aficionado.</em></p> <p><em>Mr. Hughes was born in North Wales in 1960, son of an Anglican priest. He began making art on the computer in 1998 in NYC.</em></p> <p><em>Mr. Kardon has been valiantly applying CPR to painting, which once had as its heart the means to express of specific feeling, for several decades. Mr. Kardon has recently found it a good idea to put into print some of his more pointed ideas about his practice.</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3710&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="LEf4gu7dzfWJ8YP9yfsBzmnuF_BjQVtPORzgJyKcdvE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 12 Jun 2018 14:00:00 +0000 Dusty Wright 3710 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3710#comments