Dusty Wright's Culture Catch - Smart Pop Culture, Video & Audio podcasts, Written Reviews in the Arts & Entertainment http://culturecatch.com/node/feed en Greed, Opioids, and a Little Dirty Harry http://culturecatch.com/node/4005 <span>Greed, Opioids, and a Little Dirty Harry</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/brandon-judell" lang="" about="/users/brandon-judell" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brandon Judell</a></span> <span>February 26, 2021 - 17:35</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/film" hreflang="en">Film Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/797" hreflang="en">drama</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2021/2021-02/crisis_photo_2.jpg?itok=74dNt3jB" width="1200" height="802" alt="Thumbnail" title="crisis_photo_2.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><em><strong>Crisis (Quiver Distribution)</strong></em></p> <p>Who could not like a film where the lead villain -- a short, bearded Quebecois drug dealer -- is called Mother? (Hey, you! Put your hand down.)</p> <p>Writer/director Nicholas Jarecki, whose previous effort, <i>Arbitrage </i>(2012), dealt with a troubled hedge-fund magnate, a role earning Richard Gere a Golden Globe Best Actor nomination, has now focused on the opioid epidemic. As noted on screen:</p> <blockquote> <p>"Over 100,000 people die from opioid overdoses every year, a figure that grows over 20% annually."</p> </blockquote> <p>Employing a triptych plotline, Jarecki's passion project attacks from three semi-disparate perspectives. There’s a mother seeking revenge for the death of her teenage son; a university professor soul-searching on whether to reveal the results of his lab work that might cost the very drug company funding his research billions; and an undercover cop trying his best to upend a Canadian-based fentanyl operation.</p> <p>The first two storylines, although rather familiar, are often engaging due to the high committed performances of Evangeline Lilly and Gary Oldman.</p> <p>Lilly is Claire Reiman, an architect once addicted to oxycodone, who's now coping by attending a weekly support group. There she recounts slamming a car door on her wrist to get her lapsed prescription for the drug renewed. Sadly, one evening, before she can spell out "P-H-A-R-M-A-C-E-U-T-I-C-A-L-S," her only child is found dead with a foaming mouth next to his bicycle. What at first seems to be an overdose is eventually diagnosed as something more sinister, causing Lilly to get a gun and head off to Montreal for revenge.</p> <p>Oldman, meanwhile, takes on the role of Dr. Tyrone Brower, a college researcher who ponders becoming a whistleblower when the drug he's testing, supposedly the first nonaddictive painkiller, starts killing his mice. The rodents seemingly prefer the drug to cheese and starve to death. Just imagine if this elixir wound up on the shelves your local Duane Reade. Chaos and plummeting gorgonzola sales.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Y0JZVfQFqos?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Inarguably, either one of the above tales would have supplied a solid premise for a feature, but a public-spirited ambition overruled that.</p> <p>Clearly, the final element of the <i>Crisis </i>saga upends this offering. Armie Hammer here plays Jake Kelly, a taciturn undercover cop saddled with a drug-addicted sister (Lily-Rose Depp) with a 40% hearing loss in her right ear. Basically sporting one-pained expression throughout, Jake, when not travelling about in a trunk of a car, spouts clichéd dialogue with clichéd crooks. For example, after a drug courier named Cedric gets snagged in Canada while pulling a sled loaded with fentanyl towards the U.S. border, the following conversation occurs stateside:</p> <p><b>Kelly:</b> Jesus! How the fuck did that happen?</p> <p><b>Crook:</b> I don’t know how it happened, but apparently there's a lot of anxiety bouncing around right now. . . . Should Cedric have an itch to name names . . .</p> <p><b>Kelly:</b> No, he's not gonna name any fuckin' names.</p> <p><b>Crook:</b> Good because that would be unpleasant for everyone.</p> <p>Hammer is quite fine in a film without peaches. Here he glares with perfection, has an admirable posture, and seems to be quite ready for a <em>Dirty Harry</em> remake. In a film with a bigger budget, where his was the only saga being told, fans of heroes with stoic features and limited emotions would be lining up at the box office.</p> <p>But Jarecki, as noted, has higher aims. He wants to display all of the cogs in the machine that gets drugs onto our streets and into our medicine cabinets: the innate corporate capacity for greed without shame and its end results. To accomplish that, Jarecki needed a miniseries. Who knows? Netflix might bite still.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=4005&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="QEJq23Z0dKCpzm7RaK2hPuJfOvK4FXtS9c4QZU4K_oM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 26 Feb 2021 22:35:59 +0000 Brandon Judell 4005 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/4005#comments Line and Fill http://culturecatch.com/node/4004 <span>Line and Fill</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/millree-hughes" lang="" about="/users/millree-hughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Millree Hughes</a></span> <span>February 24, 2021 - 10:42</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1200" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2021/2021-02/angela_dufresne_examinations.jpeg?itok=PfUAI9HX" title="angela_dufresne_examinations.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Angela Dufresne's Examinations</figcaption></figure><p>Angela Dufresne</p> <p>Yossi Milo Gallery, NYC</p> <p>Thru March 7th</p> <p>In the back room of Angela Dufresne's show at Yossi Milo Gallery (up until March 7th) is a painting of a bar, could be in the Castro or at the Mardi Gras. An unruly drunken mob of revelers hang out on a balcony. On closer look they appear to be oversized putti peeing in golden streams into bowls held by figures below. A child in the middle has a prosthetic leg. Looking deep into the back bar we can see sketchy lines representing people, children, and animals playing and acting up.</p> <p>The balcony scene in "Golden Showers of Love Painting" 2019, has the cramped physical pressure of Paul Cadmus' 1934 painting "The Fleet's in." But some of the volume has been allowed to evaporate or blow away. Her decision not to fully fill out all the figures is counteracted by attention to their weight. How a foot turns to carry a hip, say.  There's another force at play too, that opens up this busy field of marks. A kind of a Meta stroke; a larger line that winds behind and sometimes in front, like a gestural, abstract ghost trying to take form.</p> <p>Dufresne's line is exploring hidden forces working at different levels. It's a free line picking out free people.</p> <p>A huge portrait of her partner Liz Bonaventura is an explosion of "fill." Liz, a painter herself, is caught in a state of tragic mental loss, a solitary face, a counterpoint to the party paintings  next to her. </p> <p>Most of the show is a widely diverse mob scene, though it's not a riot. There's no cruelty in the free play. "Do what thou wilt" is not "the Whole of the Law"* if it hurts others. Which is why "Examinations" 2020 can show multiple nursing mothers in a rowdy disco. A baby is being born from a cartoon horse, the kid is holding a baby shark with a fish in its mouth as if it came from Breughel's "Big Fish eat Little Fish" drawing of 1556.</p> <p>"Pluralistic Polymorphic Space Station with Media Inputs" 2020 is hung eight feet over our heads on the wall above the opening leading out of the front space. The flight deck is filled with with more casual revelers. Fun lovers are everywhere. </p> <p>At other times the paintings tighten up, into portraits or small paintings with two or three figures many of these are in the middle room of the gallery. </p> <p>Dufresne contrasts the vibrating line of the group with the "fill" of her portraits.</p> <p>There are a number of paintings of actress Gena Rowlands. Pulling away from the wide shot of the Bacchanalia and punching into a tight on her. In "Gina Rowland's" 2020, contemplation takes over in large juicy strokes. Filling out her ideas in spring lilac, Summery yellows, squiggles of grassy green.</p> <p>  At the end of Marcel Carne's "Les Enfants du Paradis" 1945, the camera follows Baptiste through the carnival crowd. He is trying to catch up with Garance, his lover, overcome with desire as he is swallowed by the party.</p> <p>This is a sucker punch of a show, a groovy living statement of intent. We are in a time when getting together publicly raises issues. "The social distribution of bodies"** is powerfully charged. From the public to the private, the political content of free expression whether dancing, making love, or painting a picture can unmoor us from conventional thinking. We are not drones. We are not imbeciles. We are free.</p> <p>But if we've learnt anything this year it's that we are not entitled to freedom. We have to earn it. And it's not much cop if you can't guesstimate what it is you want to be free from. So it has to emerge through equal parts contemplation and free expression. Look at "The Insurrection," one isn’t worth much without the other. <em>- Millree Hughes</em></p> <p>*Aleister Crowley</p> <p>**Jacques Ranciere</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=4004&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="P8u25DPQ2Bk-CXTz5gEZMmclm858nqW248v72tS2v2w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 24 Feb 2021 15:42:14 +0000 Millree Hughes 4004 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/4004#comments Short Talk About Artist Mario Schifano http://culturecatch.com/node/4003 <span>Short Talk About Artist Mario Schifano</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/kathleen-cullen" lang="" about="/users/kathleen-cullen" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kathleen Cullen</a></span> <span>February 20, 2021 - 12:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/896" hreflang="en">curator</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1204" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2021/2021-02/4._en_plein_air_1963.jpg?itok=MaeAvbVH" title="4._en_plein_air_1963.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>En plein air, 1963, Enamel on paper on canvas, 63 x 63 in (additional credit below)</figcaption></figure><p>At a time when we are all missing travel, I got to not only to take a quick trip to Italy, but also back in time to the '60s. No, this was not feet of magic, but rather a visit to the Center For Italian Modern Art to see the work of Mario Schifano 1960-1965. Schifano actually visited New York during this period because of his interest in the contemporary art scene here. This interest didn’t anchor him America and he would have a major impact on the Italian art world. I had a chance to talk with Genevieve Martin, the centers Managing Director and the shows curator, Francesco Guzzetti, Ph.D., the 2019–20 Postdoctoral Fellow at the Morgan Library and Museum’s Drawing Institute, and former CIMA Fellow (2014–15), to discuss the artist and the Center For Italian Modern Art.</p> <p><b>Kathleen Cullen:</b> Let's start with an update of the mission of The Center For Italian Modern Art and how people can arrange to visit at this time?</p> <p><b>Genevieve Martin: </b>The Center for Italian Modern Art (CIMA) is a 501c3 public nonprofit exhibition and research center established in 2013 in New York City to promote public appreciation and advance the study of modern and contemporary Italian art in the United States and internationally. We're founded on a legacy in community building that dates to 1950 when Gianni Mattioli opened his Milan apartment to share his collection of Italian modern art with the public. Regardless of their status -- scholars, artists, and neighbors enjoyed transformative encounters with extraordinary works of art. On Sundays, Gianni would even personally offer guided tours. His daughter, Laura Mattioli created CIMA to ensure that this tradition of compassion, humanity, and community could live on. Without a collection, but instilled with all these values, CIMA is safeguarding and cultivating the next generation of scholars. They travel from all over the world to study the works at CIMA and like Gianni, they welcome you to our gallery and directly share their knowledge, an espresso, and conversation.</p> <p>The best way to visit CIMA is by reserving one of these fellow-guided tours. They take place on Fridays at 11 am and 2 pm by appointment. On Saturdays, we offer open hours so visitors can explore the exhibition independently between 11 am and 4 pm. Curator-guided audio tours are available at no additional cost. Since many visitors are unable to visit the show in person, we now offer fellow-guided digital tours on Sunday mornings at 11 am. Our membership program allows members to make private visits when we're closed to the public -- a museum to yourself for an hour! Throughout the season, CIMA holds special tours, events, conversations, and study days as part of its programming. Discover our many offerings at <a href="http://italianmodernart.org/" target="_blank">italianmodernart.org</a></p> <p><b>KC: </b>Why have you decided to bring the work of Schifano from this period? </p> <p><b>Francesco Guzzetti: </b>Schifano's body of work between 1960 and 1965 -- I think -- embodies the Italian-American relationships better than any other Italian artists at that time. The diverse range of inspirations incorporated and even questioned by the artist in his paintings cover the most influential aspects of American art and culture, with special focus on the New York art scene, as it was circulating in Rome since the postwar years. Jazz music, the new tendencies of artists like Dine, Johns, Rauschenberg or Warhol, the sides of New York artistic and cultural scene that he encountered through Frank O'Hara during his first trip to NY between 1963-64, were all integrated into Schifano's unique vision of the art and culture of his time. That's why I thought that the artist's production between 1960 and 1965 could especially resonate with the NY public. </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1173" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2021/2021-02/3._leonardo_1963.jpg?itok=ObXBPXR_" title="3._leonardo_1963.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>LEONARDO, 1963 ENAMEL ON PAPER ON CANVAS 78 3/4 X 78 3/4 IN (additional credit below).</figcaption></figure><p><b>KC: </b>We know Schifano visited New York during this time. Why did he come and how was he received? Do you think the visit impacted his work? </p> <p><b>FG: </b>Schifano owed the experimentation in new media, film especially, to the exposure to the underground films realized in New York. The artist saw all of them and retained a vivid impression, which would leave its imprint on the films he realized starting in 1964 when he made the film Round Trip which is included in the show at CIMA. Schifano stayed in NY for 6 months (Dec. 1963-Jun. 1964), he met all the artists he had already heard of before. His work met a sort of resistance from the reviewers and critics, but was much favored by Frank O'Hara, who wrote a poem for the catalog of Schifano's solo show at ODyssia Gallery in New York in 1964 and would collaborate with him in the most amazing work done by Schifano in New York, namely the 17 sheets of Words&amp;Drawings. For good or bad, the reception of his works helps understand the particular kind of figuration the artist elaborated at that time, with especially resonates with the work of Larry Rivers.</p> <p><b>KC: </b>The exhibition also includes work by important modern artists of the time. What is the relevance in relation to Schifano and his work? </p> <p><b>FG: </b>The works by Rauschenberg (seven collages never exhibited or published before), Jasper Johns, and Jim Dine all come from the Sonnabend Collection Foundation. Their presence helps understand why the powerful dealer Ileana Sonnabend favored Schifano among all the artists who were based in Rome at the time when she moved there from New York. In addition, the work of these artists was much discussed among the Rome-based artists and resonates with Schifano's investigation of the materiality of the painted surface as expressed in his so-called "monochromes" realized in 1960-62.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1677" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2021/2021-02/2._schifano_grande_particolare_di_propaganda_1962.jpg?itok=LEEfRQu8" title="2._schifano_grande_particolare_di_propaganda_1962.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>GRANDE PARTICOLARE DI PROPAGANDA, 1962 ENAMEL ON PAPER ON CANVAS 74 ⅜ X 59 INCHES (additional credit below)</figcaption></figure><p><b>KC: </b>Schifano would have a long well-established career that would include music and film. What impact does his work have on the Italian art world and what do you hope the visitors to this show will take with them? </p> <p><b>FG: </b>Schifano would soon become a reference, a master for the younger generations of artists who revived painting and figuration in the 1980s. His use of photograph and film was also extremely influential. I hope the visitors to this show will take with them the enthusiasm for having discovered the work of an artist who still deserves to be internationally acknowledged as one of the most relevant figures bridging postwar and contemporary art, whose work anticipated many issues and practices which are still relevant today.</p> <p><em>Credits:</em></p> <p><em>En plein air, 1963 Enamel on paper on canvas 63 x 63 in (160 x 160 cm) Private Collection, Monaco © Archivio Mario Schifano ©2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome</em></p> <p><em>Leonardo, 1963 Enamel on paper on canvas 78 3/4 x 78 3/4 in (200 x 200 cm) Private Collection © Archivio Mario Schifano ©2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome</em></p> <p><em>Grande particolare di propaganda, 1962 Enamel on paper on canvas 74 ⅜ x 59 inches (189 x 150cm) Private Collection © Archivio Mario Schifano ©2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=4003&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="StW1_hes8aul2eq0Z1zxIBacu6kq0BCYm6VuIoWEbUQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 20 Feb 2021 17:44:09 +0000 Kathleen Cullen 4003 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/4003#comments A Collection of Epitaphs http://culturecatch.com/node/4002 <span>A Collection of Epitaphs</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/millree-hughes" lang="" about="/users/millree-hughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Millree Hughes</a></span> <span>February 16, 2021 - 17:10</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/896" hreflang="en">curator</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1032" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2021/2021-02/adrian.jpeg?itok=wYCKxICP" title="adrian.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="828" /></article><figcaption>Adrian in front of his Richard Smith painting</figcaption></figure><p>I would never write my own obituary. I'm far too superstitious. What if Fate misunderstood my "joke"? But Adrian Dannatt does that at the end of his wonderful new book -- <em>Doomed and Famous</em>. It is a collection of epitaphs that he has written for all kinds of eccentric and curious characters from the Arts of New York and Europe. The book is published by Sequence Press in collaboration with Miguel Abreu Gallery. The lives of the famous and exceptional are further honored by an exhibition in the gallery of pieces from Dannatt's personal collection.</p> <p>Each object has an hard to imagine resonance for the collector so the best way to see this show is by calling the gallery and booking the curator/author to guide you around it.</p> <p>You will experience the colourful nature both of Dannatt's persona and his take on art and literature in general. In English clothes and swept back hair, throwing out anecdotes and rapid fire digressions, he will explain how each of the artists lives and eccentric habits affected him as he jumps polyvalently across the room from one piece to another. </p> <p>Everything is evinced by his study of idiosyncratic behavior.  Don't worry though, both in the show and in the book he allows us to enjoy these nutters, geniuses, trust fund layabouts, and free thinkers for what they are, without worrying too much about the consequences of any of their actions</p> <p>The whole show looks like an estate sale. Some pieces, magazines, posters, and poetry books are in cases along the wall to one side and in the centre of the space. One wall is filled with art sometimes five tiers high. </p> <p>In this group there are some intimate wriggly Matt Mullicans and Derek Boshier paintings on paper.  </p> <p>Nearby is a gorge Nancy Spero silk print text piece, "Torture in Chile" (1975). Words scumbled and rubbed into the surface with a grungy tactility.</p> <p>Abreu’s gallery has great light.</p> <p>Either from the shop front window that catches the sun in the morning to the skylights at the back that flood that space. Here are two works by lesser known British pop artists. A Bob Stanley Beatles painting that looks just like a screen print. Even though at first glance it looks like a commercial product. Stanley had a wavering, explorative line that pushed away from the impersonal look of Pop. There's a glorious Richard Smith called "Slices" from 1964. It's a king-sized extrapolation through space of a cigarette packet design. </p> <p>In the vitrines are typical examples of the kind of characters that Dannatt loves. Many of them British, perhaps because becoming a "character" is a way of dealing with the class system. It allows you to jump out of the standard classifications that the islanders impose on each other. </p> <p>One way to stand apart as a creative, is to set yourself an impossible task, like Cornelius Cardew represented here by a tract called "Stockhausen Saves Imperialism." A composer devoted to making radically theoretical work that he thought would be embraced by the working classes even though it was very hard to listen to. </p> <p>Throughout the space there are portraits of our host. By Duncan Hannah, Ena Swansea, and Walter Robinson. The Robinson is based on a Courbet portrait which seems to capture our host in mid-flow.</p> <p>In another case is book of prose by surrealist Dorothea Tanning, dedicated him:</p> <blockquote> <p>"talking about everyone and everything and nothing (meaning me)."</p> </blockquote> <p>My favorite area is downstairs in the gallery basement. Here everything is hugger mugger. A great Marisol lithograph, a divine Salvator Rosa drawing, even a bold physical etching by Allan Jones that is unlike the more slick work he is known for.</p> <p>Is Adrian Selling up his stuff and writing himself off? That would be a shame, his role in the Art World has always been about personal connections. The old Art World where people met at openings and gossiped, praised and kvetched. But perhaps the idea is to preserve his own persona in our mind, at its point of perfection by play acting the death of its creator. </p> <p>Rather as the murderer does in Robert Browning's poem "Porphyria's Lover." Where the lunatic beau kills his beloved at the apex of her beauty seemingly (to the narrator) with her permission.</p> <p>      "And thus we sit together now, </p> <p>       And all night long we have not stirred, </p> <p>       And yet God has not said a word"</p> <p>But more chronistically, this show speaks to our situation. Our distanced relationships. Cut off from our friends, seeing art infrequently, if at all. Dannatt can't have you round his house but this is the next best thing. - Millree Hughes</p> <p><em>Miguel Abreu Gallery, Winter Hours: </em></p> <p><em>88 Eldridges Street, New York, Tues-Sat, 10:30AM-6:30PM, Sunday by <u><a href="https://calendly.com/miguelabreugallery" target="_blank">APPOINTMENT</a></u> only.<br /> 36 Orchard Stree, Wed-Sat. for an appointment with Adrian, call: <a href="tel:212.995.1774">212.995.1774</a></em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=4002&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="MnCvuoesBhZ84lfZxu3mhIjaVsKOgIbxVX94sHFo5JI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 16 Feb 2021 22:10:44 +0000 Millree Hughes 4002 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/4002#comments Finally, My Year in Review http://culturecatch.com/node/4000 <span>Finally, My Year in Review</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/steveholtje" lang="" about="/users/steveholtje" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Steve Holtje</a></span> <span>February 5, 2021 - 09:10</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/895" hreflang="en">best of 2020</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DgWaChX1cno?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>This will probably be my last best-of-the-year list, because I am egregiously breaking a rule. I have not listed Bob Dylan’s <i>Rough and Rowdy Ways</i>. All critics over the age of 55 are required, by Rock Critic Law, to include any Bob Dylan album of new recordings not consisting of jazz standards or holiday music. But I just couldn't; it contains at best three good songs and one eccentric monument that asks more of listeners than it gives back. So there. Go ahead, revoke my license to critique.</p> <p>Anyway, there were a number of excellent albums from both veterans and relative newcomers, and a bit of a trend of big-name artists releasing two albums (which might be pandemic-related), several of whom show up on my list. (One two-albumer who doesn't, Taylor Swift, almost became interesting with her move to less slick and more acoustic production, but her sense of melody remains a predictable algorithm that may get her on the pop charts but is too much like playground chants to achieve emotional depth.)</p> <ol><li><b>Moving Targets: <i>Humbucker</i> (Dead Broke)</b></li> </ol><p>Picking this album by revived '80s Boston stalwarts probably marks me as an old fart, but dammit, half the tracks are the catchiest, most energizing tunes I heard this year. Kenny Chambers retains his genius for simple but irresistible hooks.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jeaNTiVqQZY?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <ol><li><b>2. Bob Mould: <i>Blue Hearts</i> (Merge)</b></li> </ol><p>After an acoustic opening track, Mould kicks into gear with the furious “Next Generation” and never lets up, most of the pummeling songs bleeding into the next. Until closing track “The Ocean,” slower and slightly less relentless through still electric, no song breaks the three-minute mark. Comparisons to Husker Du and/or Sugar would be unfair and inaccurate, but if they’re how you most like Mould, you’ll like this 35-minute burst of passion.</p> <p><b>3. The Flaming Lips: <i>American Head</i> (Warner Bros.)</b></p> <p>This is nothing like the title might suggest; rather, it is a beautiful and heart-wrenching meditation on early death -- not pandemic-related, yet apt for 2020. Not just death, though; also youth, innocence and its loss, drugs (good and bad), and of course love. The surprise (with the Lips, there’s always a surprise) is the presence of country singer Kacey Musgrave, whose contributions are key. BTW the Lipsters sort of got in on the two-albums trend with <i>Deap Lips</i>, a collaboration with Deap Vally; perhaps it was by the Lips concentrating their eccentricities on <i>Deap Lips</i> that <i>American Head</i> got to be relatively straightforward and attractive.</p> <p><b>4. Autechre: <i>SIGN</i> (Warp)</b></p> <p>Another two-albums-in-2020 artist. <i>SIGN</i>, while still quite recognizably Autechre, uses far more melodic material than their norm, and thus seems warmer and more emotive. (PLUS, a tad less melodic, makes that much less impact, though it’s still great.)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fhKHbLw6ivg?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>5. Ben Neill &amp; Eric Calvi: <i>Trove</i> </b><strong>(Blue Math)</strong></p> <p>This serialized project from the inventor of the Mutantrumpet and the French producer/sound engineer is ongoing but had reached 15 items and well over an hour of music by the end of 2020, enough to qualify for this list. Neill composes these ambient pieces "based on a Fibonacci series matrix," whatever that entails; it transcends genre and structure. Released via all digital outlets; iTunes, Amazon, Spotify, etc.</p> <p><b>6. SAULT: <i>Untitled (Rise)</i> (Forever Living Originals)</b></p> <p>Two-album artist #3. This is by far the better of their two. With beats either hip-hop or African, lyrics that ping-pong between Pollyannaish uplift and righteous protest, chanted/declaimed, flung upward in diva outbursts of virtuoso bravura, or occasionally sung in deliberately high-range fuzzy chorus style <i>a la</i> children’s singing, and often minimal harmonic instrumental underpinning, though at times harmony becomes fuller, notably on the beautiful piano-powered penultimate track, "The Black &amp; Gold." Most viciously cutting track: "You Know It Ain't."</p> <p><b>7. Sweeping Promises: <i>Hunger for a Way Out</i> (Feel It)</b></p> <p>Post-punk with urgent female vocals is one of my favorite sounds; here's a new entry that pushes all the right buttons. The sound is familiar -- throbbing bass lines, trebly guitar chords, the occasional synth interjection, angularly propulsive rhythms -- yet unimitative enough to spark new pleasure.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1kKBdcncVVY?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>8. The Johns: <i>Forge</i> (Concierge)</b></p> <p>This Brooklyn band, led by singer/guitarist John Dydo, sounds different on every track here; what ties everything together are Dydo’s David Berman-esque vocals and wry humor. Aside from "Blood Run Free," it’s a low-key album that doesn't push itself at listeners, but on repeated listens proves quite ingratiating, with the stylistic variety turning into a selling point.</p> <p><b>9. Wire: <i>Mind Hive</i> (pinkflag)</b></p> <p>No rock band with a recording hiatus of over a decade has ever come back more prolifically AND successfully (artistically speaking) than Wire. They are a borderline two-2020-albums band, having both this (new material) and the Record Store Day release <i>10:20</i> album of outtakes (in the process equaling the number of full-length studio albums they released in 1977-91). The first track, "Be Like The," is startling in its metal –style guitar chords, but after that they mostly return to their familiar post-2003 style, though "Oklahoma" contains a few surprising production touches.</p> <p><b>10. Deerhoof: <i>Future Teenage Cave Artists</i> (Joyful Noise)</b></p> <p>Another of the two-album groups; the other is a digital-only concert album. As I wrote in my review in <i>The Big Takeover</i>, "<i>Future...</i> is this quartet’s new studio album, and though its sound is immediately recognizable, still they have never repeated themselves. Their use of unusual textures and arty post-punk approach ("O Ye Saddle Babes" even sounds like Captain Beefheart!) gives them a great deal of room to experiment and an appealing looseness.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gnE7Ygvz3Vs?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p> </p> <p><b>11. Oranssi Pazuzu: <i>Mestarin kynsi</i> (Nuclear Blast)</b></p> <p>Perhaps the most stylistically adventurous band in metal, this Finnish band has the usual cartoonish guttural black-metal growls, courtesy of vocalist Jun-His, but instrumentally their mixture of asymmetrical meters, dense arrangements, unexpectedly varied timbres, and psychedelic/shoegaze/prog-rock touches is unique and enthralling</p> <p><b>12. Drive-By Truckers: <i>The Unraveling</i> (ATO)</b></p> <p>It is perhaps no coincidence that DBT’s first album after a four-year recording break is a coruscating look at the Trump years.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fC6hoIzrNl0?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>13. Live Skull: <i>Dangerous Visions</i> (Bronson)</b></p> <p>Though there's not a lot of new material here, it does include some songs written during New York City's semi-quarantine this year, the most affecting of which is "In a Perfect World." The second half is '80s archival material, and some of the first half is re-recordings of back-catalog items.</p> <p><b>14. Activity: <i>Unmask Whoever</i> (Western Vinyl)</b></p> <p>Travis Johnson (ex-Grooms) has transcended all his early influences (not to say one can't hear hints, but they're thoroughly melded now) to make this haunting album of gently chiming guitars, evocative lyrics, and enough rhythmic energy to keep it edgy.</p> <p><b>15. Sufjan Stevens: <i>Ascension</i> (Asthmatic Kitty)</b></p> <p>On his first solo album in five years, Stevens changes musical directions with an album of musically gentle electronica but hard-hitting lyrics. Of course, when a good songwriter changes production styles, the good songwriting serves as the throughline, so this sounds less disconnected from his earlier work than it might seem on first listen. It was his second release of 2020, the first being a second-billed collaboration with Lowell Brams, his stepfather, on a mostly instrumental album.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2dYi4P0xNkE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>16. Cleaners from Venus: <i>Dollybirds and Spies</i> (self-released)</b></p> <p>Martin Newell continues to write the most magically perfect pop songs, as he's been doing for forty years, and if nobody else will put them out, he’ll keep doing it himself. Truly he is, as one of his album titles proclaimed in 1993, The Greatest Living Englishman. This is not even in the top half of his output and it's still better than 99.99% of 2020's releases. Would that Sir Paul McCartney's latest had been half this melodic and quirky and charming.</p> <p><b>17.</b> <b>Drive-By Truckers: <i>The New OK</i> (ATO)</b></p> <p>Finally, a band whose two 2020 albums are both top-20-albums-worthy. This despite the fact that one suspects these are leftover tracks from <i>The Unraveling</i> (whose title track is not there, but rather here on <i>The New OK</i>). There is further commentary on the Trump years; "The Perilous Night," the centerpiece of the album, says "Ronnie Reagan must be spinnin’ in his grave" and "flags of oppression are blocking out the light, dismantling the Greatest Generation's fight." In this context, the closing cover of The Ramones' "The KKK Took My Baby Away" packs extra oomph.</p> <p><b>18. The Mommyheads: <i>New Kings of Pop</i> (Fan/Mommyhead)</b></p> <p>My Big Takeover review: "Indie-rockers influenced by prog-rock who avoid the latter genre’s self-indulgent excesses, this brilliant but ill-fated '90s band lives up to the cheeky title of their newest album, which is super-catchy; if modern pop won’t accept them as kings, that’s pop’s problem, not their fault. They have now made more albums since their 2008 reunion than they did in their original incarnation, and with no drop-off in quality. Highlights include 'Greta Thunberg,' a tribute to the teenage environmental spokeswoman, and the Queenesque harmonies on the title track."</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tcp7m6zZjCk?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>19. Magnetic Fields: <i>Quickies</i> (Nonesuch)</b></p> <p>In a year of seriousness, Stephi n Merritt provided the perfect relief, a goofy albeit often comically morbid album. The title, though there's a song about a brief assignation in a bathroom, most reflects the brevity of all tracks, one as short as 12 seconds, the longest 2:35, and six are under a minute; needless to say, nothing overstays its welcome.</p> <p><b>20. Cirith Ungol: <i>Forever Black</i> (Metal Blade)</b></p> <p>My metal-loving friends may have many 2020 metal albums they consider better than this one by a veteran American group, which celebrates its 50<sup>th</sup> anniversary in 2021, albeit having been on hiatus for half that time, making this just its fifth studio full-length, and its first this century. It is, however, arguably their most accomplished performance; while some of their early albums are more historically important, they suffer sonically. And there's a certain nostalgic glow coming off this album, and a sense of a band that has consolidated its strengths into one brilliant statement.</p> <p>Best song from an album not listed: "A Hero’s Death" by Fontaines D.C. from their album <i>A Hero's Death</i> (Partisan)</p> <p><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/3x9Fdxt2AvcFQDzt3hLu8h" width="300"></iframe></p> <p><strong>REISSUES:</strong></p> <p><b>Various Artists: <i>Soul Love Now: The Black Fire Records Story, 1975-1993</i></b></p> <p>Another great label compilation. Black Fire was an indie label in Virginia that put out some great soul and spiritual jazz albums; artists here include Oneness of Juju, early E.U. before they went hip-hop, jazz saxophonist Byard Lancaster, African drummer Okyerema Asante, and more. There’s enough R&amp;B here that it lands on this list.</p> <p>  </p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YXMpnJyUvo8?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>2. Phast Phreddie &amp; Thee Precisions: <i>Limbo</i> (Manifesto)</b></p> <p>Eighties L.A. scene band that briefly included Jeffrey Lee Pierce (Gun Club) playing jump blues and garage rock, including Pierce’s “What a Friend We Have in Whiskey.” This two-CD set is the year’s most fun reissue.</p> <p><b> </b></p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/T33eOrt2eI0?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>3. Red Lights: <i>Red Lights</i> (In the Red)</b></p> <p>Another Pierce project: he started this group in 1978 with two members of The Last. This EP has the band’s five demos. "Debbie by the Christmas Tree" is about Blondie's Debbie Harry.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xaYSDh92Wsc?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>4. Be Bop Deluxe: <i>Axe Victim</i> (Cherry Red)</b></p> <p>BBD's debut album features a more glam-oriented approach than its subsequent release and launched Bowie comparisons leader/singer/guitarist Bill Nelson ran from (the group was completely revamped afterwards aside from Nelson). Nonetheless it has held up quite well in terms of songwriting and production, and "Adventures in a Yorkshire Landscape" pointed towards BBD’s future. The attraction for fans is of course all the additional material -- a whopping 28 tracks of radio appearances, audition versions, alternate takes, and varying mixes.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R3Uq2T21jfY?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>5. Pete Rodriguez: <i>I Like It Like That</i> (Craft)</b></p> <p>"Mr. Boogaloo," born in the Bronx in 1932, gets a vinyl reissue of his biggest hit. The LP (issued by Alegre in 1967) is all killer, no filler.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PDJY4OzgTWs?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Albums I would list above if not for conflict of interest:</p> <p><b>Buck Curran: <i>No Love Is Sorrow</i> (ESP-Disk')</b></p> <p>Gentle psychedelic folk created in quarantine.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JKFr3Rtbh-A?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>Kevin Keller: <i>The Front Porch of Heaven</i> (Kevin Keller)</b></p> <p>A lovely ambient album with emotive undercurrents.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AUfjqQkAZ-o?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>Dusty Wright: <i>Can Anyone Hear Me? </i>(PetRock)</b></p> <p>Simple on the surface but touches on universal truths; rewards attention with catharsis. (Read Rob Cochrane's review <a href="http://culturecatch.com/node/3964" target="_blank">here</a>.)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2n6u7geioyw?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><em>- Steve Holtje</em></p> </div> <section> <a id="comment-2485"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1613512127"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/2485#comment-2485" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Label/details</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Hi Steve...just a heads up that the label for Trove is Blue Math, my own imprint; and the tracks are available at all digital outlets; iTunes, Amazon, etc. Thanks for the support!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=2485&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5iSi-ztbDugii-1W4FCp0rIy6QcVGe3HFXTJe_Eirnc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.benneill.com/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ben Neill</a> on February 10, 2021 - 00:52</p> </footer> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=4000&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="aIAe0xSKRTHpCiheQFHRcsfnybKBuLmNDYajhkgoNLM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 05 Feb 2021 14:10:10 +0000 Steve Holtje 4000 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/4000#comments The Self You Think You Are and Those You Think You See http://culturecatch.com/node/3999 <span>The Self You Think You Are and Those You Think You See</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/460" lang="" about="/user/460" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Cochrane</a></span> <span>February 2, 2021 - 10:18</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/127" hreflang="en">music video</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UroVey4fJ_g?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Our eyes are our cameras. </p> <p>The windows via which our souls are thus informed. </p> <p>Mostly they do not lie but can be lied to. </p> <p> </p> <p>We are beguiled by, and are, willing victims of what we witness. </p> <p>A wish to be mesmerised, to be abducted on a journey.</p> <p> </p> <p>Nowadays nothing can be taken for granted. </p> <p>Our stimulus of desire may be tricked and yet we respond as though it all were real. </p> <p>What we see is what we feel.</p> <p>The perfectly edited lies of the flat screen.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the digital age, unless you're connected properly, no-one will hear you scream.</p> <p>You expect an arrival of reward in the hope to dream.</p> <p> </p> <p>What has connected us has thus infected us.</p> <p>Does it matter any longer if what we want to believe is patently untrue?</p> <p> </p> <p>It can be a form of consolation.</p> <p>A sense of inner devastation.</p> <p>Truth dressed as something so perfectly fake.</p> <p> </p> <p>There is a question of self, a desire to be seen as we wish to be percieved.</p> <p>The shop window and facade that hides imperfect emptiness.</p> <p> </p> <p>We are bombarded and thus we bombard.</p> <p>Images of adulation as aspects of ideals that hide a fear of rejection.</p> <p>To be seen as we believe ourselves as we should have arrived, although deep down we have gilded a lie.</p> <p> </p> <p>The perfect lips, the faultless nose and brightly coloured eyes.</p> <p>We have corrected the wishes that had failed us.</p> <p> </p> <p>Everyone is ready, ready for their close-up on the small screen.</p> <p> </p> <p>Steven Wilson's presentation of his song "Self" is a visual confection of deceit, disingenuosly delivered.</p> <p>Crafted like a symphony of greys favoured in fashion shoots, it is a casual creepy nightmare.</p> <p>What you see will make you respond though you know it isn't real.</p> <p>The revolution has not only been televised it had been perfectly digitised.</p> <p>It is also scarily appropriate for our time of masks and the perfect entree for his latest album 'The Future Bites'.</p> <p> </p> <p>Miles Skarin is Wilson's collaborator in this skin-deep lie.</p> <p>A magician without a rabbit, dove, or hat.</p> <p>He presents us with Wilson in a suit and glasses like a promo shot for an advert selling classy facial furniture.</p> <p> </p> <p>The show begins underscored by stacccato lyrics that emerge in deep red text.</p> <p>A visual jarring of celebrity faces you recognise but are thrown by.</p> <p>Hard to place initially they haunt.</p> <p>They are transposed on Wilson's body.</p> <p>A Frankenstein a go go pandrogyny.</p> <p> </p> <p>Theirs is a subtle smack that jars the casual gaze.</p> <p>Stops you in thoughts of suspended speculation.</p> <p> </p> <p>It is a stroke of subtle genius.</p> <p>Graceful takes that also are a litany of false impressions.</p> <p>Nothing is of the sort of what it seems. </p> <p>All flickers by in classy black and white.</p> <p>Perfect proof that something catchy can be relevant, rewarding and simply divine.</p> <p> </p> <p>"Self" skips along like Talking Heads in tandem with Scritti Politti.</p> <p>A casually infectious piece of aural tease.</p> <p> </p> <p>The final frame is a heart chiller.</p> <p>An icicle across the soul.</p> <p>The ghost in your machine.</p> <p><em>- Robert Cochrane</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3999&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="ok7AMjy25x78ySaBsYM9LRC6_LywsSNoV995DWS0NRM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 02 Feb 2021 15:18:44 +0000 Robert Cochrane 3999 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3999#comments The World Turned Upside Down, Part IV http://culturecatch.com/node/3996 <span>The World Turned Upside Down, Part IV</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/6959" lang="" about="/user/6959" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Tony Alterman</a></span> <span>January 31, 2021 - 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/893" hreflang="en">1970</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>If the first three parts of this short history of 1970 did not get you excited about its Golden Anniversary, consider a 50<sup>th</sup> anniversary survey 10 years from now (or a 40<sup>th</sup> anniversary today). It would be quite a dismal affair: seventies bands singing their swan songs, punk giving up the ghost, and New Wave not quite soup yet. There really was very little to get excited about in 1980. Notable albums were few and far between: there was David Bowie's <i>Scary Monsters</i>,<i> Zenyatta Mondatta</i> by The Police, the B52's <i>Wild Planet</i>, and a few others. Bruce Springsteen had his first #1 album with <i>The River</i>, as did Kate Bush with <i>Never for Ever</i>; in both cases, your present critic judges their success to be due primarily to a hit song ("Hungry Heart," and "Babooshka," respectively) rather than the overall quality of the albums. (Bush squeezed two other UK top 20 singles out of <i>Never For Ever</i>; none of the three charted in the U.S.)  Without a serious doubt, the best album of the year was by a former Beatle and his wife. <i>Double Fantasy</i> has only grown on me over the years, including Yoko's songs. But what you won't find in 1980 is a wealth of great efforts in a variety of styles, a long list of songs that ring in your head after 40 years, or anything that greatly expanded the boundaries of rock. Next to it, 1970 looks like the Bicentennial fireworks.</p> <p>I'll have little to say about 1990. Little. To. Say. How little? It featured decent albums from Luka Bloom, Suzanne Vega, Midnight Oil, and The Replacements. I'm done.</p> <p>Here's the truth: 1970 was so rich that it took this 10,000-word essay to cover just the best of it (and a little of the worst). Many albums I have said little or nothing about have devoted followings: metal fans may still wax eloquent about Uriah Heep's <i>...Very 'Eavy ...Very 'Umble</i>; Randy Newman's <i>12 songs</i> still gets kudos from fans of his style of music; and Todd Rundgren followers have hardly forgotten <i>Runt</i>. There's too much, for too many kinds of audiences, to capture the full depth of 1970 in music.</p> <p>Instead, what I'm going to offer you now is a list of ten albums that are not on most people's mental playlist, but perhaps should be. Among the hundreds of albums released that year, these recordings give a sense of the breadth and depth of the era, and help support an alternate narrative to the one that sees music going to the dogs until it was saved by punk rock. These albums at least deserve a place in the regular rotation of adventurous college stations, because they offer a compelling set of songs that thumb their noses at commercial radio; yet most of them have been marginalized to the point where they are known only to those with a special interest in some subgenre or other. No guarantee that you will fall in love with any of them; all I claim is that, with an open mind for the new and different, they will sound fresh, creative, and worth the time and effort to get to know them. All of them are available on Spotify, YouTube or both. The list is not meant to be in exact order of preference or quality; I find all the albums on it to be brilliant in their own way.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Xf8O3LF-HF4?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>1. <b>if</b> - <i>if 2</i></p> <p>One day in 1970 or very close to it, I was lying in bed at home in New York listening to an FM radio station, and the DJ quietly announced a song called "Shadows and Echoes" from a new album "<i>if 2</i>". I have heard the song only rarely since then, and the album even more rarely than that, but the impression it made that first time will go to the grave with me. I was mesmerized at a song so beautifully unsettling, so hauntingly moving, that it just opens up a space inside your brain as if it had always been there. It's hard to think of a comparison; maybe Pink Floyd's "Us and Them," or the Moody Blues' "Are You Sitting Comfortably?". This impression has only been strengthened by repeated listenings; moreover, the quality of the entire album reasserts itself in ever stronger terms. "Your City Is Falling," the opening track, is not only the first in a line of urban destruction nightmares (Blue Oyster Cult, "Cities On Flame With Rock and Roll;" The Pretenders, "My City Was Gone;" Siouxsie and the Banshees, "Cities in Dust") but a terrific song that sets the tone for an album equally steeped in rock and jazz. There are only six tracks, and each one is noteworthy. I don't know why the album isn't more famous; among the several fine jazzrock albums this year it is one of the most original, with songwriting, instrumental and vocal performances throughout at a very high level.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1c0eX8Fvsmw?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>2. <b>Spirit</b> - <i>Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus</i></p> <p>If you know Spirit it is probably as the LA band that sued Led Zeppelin for royalties based on the rough similarity between Jimmy Page's fingerstyle progression at the beginning of "Stairway to Heaven" and a song of Spirit's that they claim he heard them perform. An ill-motivated grab for millions of dollars in royalties if you ask me. But don't let that stop you from exploring their music, beginning with this fascinating album. Aside from a variety of well-written and brilliantly performed songs, it may be the first rock album centered on environmental themes. "It's nature's way of telling you something's wrong" repeats the chorus of "Nature's Way," and that portentous claim is echoed throughout the album. It is endlessly creative, careening wildly along every available rock avenue, from basic pop/rock ("Animal Zoo," "Rougher Road") to hard rock ("Morning Will Come"), folk ("Life Has Just Begun") and jazz influences, plus unusual art-rock touches that give the album its standing as a "proto-prog" masterpiece. There's plenty of guitar virtuosity from Randy California (who, for you trivia buffs, began his career as the other guitarist in Jimi Hendrix's first band, Jimmy James and the Blue Flames); it is not gratuitous riffing but well-integrated with the music, especially when it leans in a jazz direction. Humor is seamlessly sewn into both the music and vocals, giving the set an appealing sort of facetiousness, reminiscent of some of 10cc's tongue-in-cheek recordings a few years later. In short, there's a lot to chew on here, and most of it has a very pleasant aftertaste.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sT4RVwmQ8NM?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>3. <b>Fanny</b> - <i>Fanny</i></p> <p>The first all-female rock band to release an album on a major label (Reprise), Fanny played all their own instruments, wrote most of their own music, and opened for the likes of David Bowie, George Harrison and a long list of top acts. For those who don't look tenderly on the emerging progressive, artrock , heavy metal and jazzrock trends of the time, this is a no-nonsense album full of down-to-earth basic rock songs. That genre was hardly over; just give a listen to Fleetwood Mac's <i>Kiln House</i> of the same year, whose production qualities give it the aura of a 60's garage band rehearsal, with material that is basic by almost any standard (and not nearly as good as <i>Fanny</i>). The album features some fine keyboard work from Nickey Barclay, and an excellent cover of Cream's <i>Badge</i> (though Fanny would outdo this on their third album with their version of Lennon-McCartney's "Hey Bulldog"). This may not be Fanny's best album, due in part to Richard Perry's production, which tends to make the band sound like they are playing in a cardboard box. He would do much better with their next couple of projects, as well as producing a host of gold records for other artists. But the energy of the performances, the songwriting, and the band's sheer talent make this a record worth knowing. (This album is perhaps the most important oversight in Wikipedia's <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_in_music#Albums_released">1970 in Music</a> page; another is Mandrill's first album, whose release date is given incorrectly on the album's Wikipedia page as 1971.)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LOuP6Afoa1o?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>4. T<b>he Move</b> - <i>Shazam</i></p> <p>The Move is often known as the band that Jeff Lynne eventually transformed into the Electric Light Orchestra. But they released two albums before Lynne joined (and Carl Wayne left), the second of which was <i>Shazam</i>. The album's six tracks are mostly extended compositions with more than hints of prog influence, though, like the Spirit album, it is about as eclectic as a single album can get. Opening with a hard rock number, the next could be a piece of folklore from a Jethro Tull or Strawbs album; the one after that features (among other things) an extended guitar arrangement of several classical pieces in 9/8 time. The rest of the album is also laced with appealing but unusual, if not tongue-in-cheek, moments. One has to wonder if lyrics like "Fields of people / There's no such thing as a weed" are supposed to be funny, or just express the well-intended but naive optimism of the moment. Perhaps the oddest entry is the final cut, a 7 ½ minute version of Tom Paxton's "The Last Thing on My Mind," which is given a treatment that brings to mind the Byrds' version of Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man." I can't say that I think Paxton's song, beautiful in itself, is a good foundation for this heavily produced take, but the apparent sincerity of the effort offsets any sense of imbalance. In any case, you would have to have a deep prejudice against this sort of whimsical musical behavior not to find <i>Shazam</i> enjoyable, with some gorgeous moments. The Move released another album in 1970 -- <i>Looking On</i>, their first with Lynne. It suggests that the group was heading down the metal tubes with the James Gang, Black Sabbath and Mountain, but for a couple of cuts that seem to strain towards psychedelia if not prog rock -- and the fact that two albums later they were ELO.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BzsmciMNAGU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>5. <b>Curtis Mayfield</b> - <i>Curtis</i></p> <p>Listen closely to Curtis Mayfield's first solo album and you can hear the roots of two completely different directions for R&amp;B: on the one hand, the jazz-tinged sound, conversational tone and political activism that would emerge on Marvin Gaye's era-defining <i>What's Going On?</i> the following year; on the other, the soaring strings and wah-wah guitar sound that hailed the beginning of disco proper on Barry White's 1973 "Love's Theme." But being a source of new trends in R&amp;B is not even the main virtue of the album. This is just great songwriting, as the immediately recognizable "Move On Up" attests, even though it failed to chart in the U.S.. "(Don't Worry) If There's a Hell Below, We're All Going to Go" did hit #3 on the R&amp;B charts, but who cares? Throughout the disk Mayfield uses a catchy combination of jazz, funk, Motown, spoken word and free experimentation. This is a moment in history when Mayfield, Gaye, Isaac Hayes, Quincy Jones, and a few others were defining a new kind of black music. <i>Curtis</i> is one of the mouths of this musical river. Put it on once, you'll play it again.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4osxPDynuxE?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>6. <b>Seatrain</b> - <i>Seatrain</i></p> <p>If you don't know who Seatrain is, or was, join the club. Although they were the first rock group I ever saw in concert (at Carnegie Hall, no less), and I owned their first album and the songbook (whose importance I will discuss in a minute) and was very familiar with their minor hit "13 Questions", I still didn't know much about anyone but violinist Richard Greene until recently. Seatrain, it turns out, was formed out of the demise of the much better-known Blues Project. That group featured some top notch musicians (including Danny Kalb, the terrific blues and folk guitarist who backed up Dylan and Phil Ochs, and who I knew for a short time many moons ago.) Greene was a first class country fiddler who had previously worked with Bill Monroe. Besides "13 Questions" and other songs, the album contains a 15-minute cut of Greene playing the hell out of a bunch of country fiddle tunes, not least the virtuoso number "Orange Blossom Special". His version of that is sometimes considered the best ever, and it is fully transcribed in the songbook. (Personally I think Vassar Clements is a match for him, but that is of course fine company to be in.) The album has another place in history, though: it was the first project produced by George Martin after the Beatles went their separate ways. Enough reasons to check it out, I think.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1OedEgzDl_I?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>7. <b>The Stooges</b> - <i>Funhouse</i></p> <p>Perhaps "under-the radar" no longer applies to an Iggy Pop album that is now recognized as a proto-punk masterpiece, but according to its <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fun_House_(The_Stooges_album)">Wikipedia page</a>, "The album had sold 89,000 copies through March 2000." It's difficult to find up-to-date sales data for albums, but at #283 on Amazon's Hard Rock sales list it is well below numerous albums by lesser-known groups. On Spotify, the album's tracks seem to have generated a combined 14 million streams - about the same as a couple of individual tracks on Blue Oyster Cult's not very well-known (but similarly brilliant) first album. Those in the know, know, but most have yet to realize that this belongs in the Pantheon of rock classics. Although the search for the roots of punk rock has led critics to cite groups as diverse as Paul Revere and the Raiders, Question Mark and the Mysterians, the Velvet Underground, MC5, The Who, and T. Rex, most of this is bullshit; it's like saying that Mozart and Beethoven are the roots of Wagner. But <i>Funhouse</i> has the spirit, if not the pneumatic beat, of punk rock. (One can make a pretty good case that punk actually began in Michigan, rather than New York or London, since the proto-punk band Death was formed in Detroit the following year, and MC5 hearkened from there too.) The album defies efforts to define it in words: "raw," "energetic," "relentless"... what might have happened if Jimi Hendrix and Jim Morrison got a band together... one step beyond Sabbath and <i>Paranoid</i>... You've got to hear it to appreciate it. Basic rock plus some kind of nervous energy that is simultaneously manic and infectious. As for the lyrics, they seem like little more than a vehicle for the music. We can't all be Dylan, but we can't all make an album like <i>Funhouse</i> either.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hKnwIvV2o7M?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>8. <b>Al Stewart</b> - <i>Zero She Flies</i></p> <p>In case you have ever confused Al "Year of the Cat" Stewart with the author of the "Stray Cat Strut", as I have, here is a kind of subterfuge: "My Enemies Have Sweet Voices," the first cut on this album is practically a prototype of Brian Setzer's hit. That aside, if you only know Stewart for his rock hits "Year of the Cat" and "Time Passages," prepare to meet one of the great folksinger-songwriters of the late 1960s and 1970s. No sooner is that first track over than you are plunged into some of the best acoustic guitar playing of the era, including great solo fingerstyle pieces reminiscent of Pierre Bensusan and songwriting on a par with the best of Donovan in his acoustic mode, or, say, Ralph McTell. It's just a consistently gorgeous and technically impressive performance behind outstanding songwriting. It ought to be better known than it is, but it had stiff competition in the folk arena in 1970. You won't find any hit-making string arrangements or gospel choruses here, just a few tasteful background instruments occasionally. It's a real musical breath of fresh air.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Wk1ECsY2lhQ?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>9. <b>Tommy James and the Shondells</b> - <i>Travelin'</i></p> <p>Full disclosure(s): I still own a copy of this album, and their previous one (<i>Cellophane Symphony</i>), not to mention their 20+ song <i>Anthology</i> CD, which replaced the slightly shorter vinyl anthology, and the 45 of Joan Jett's "Crimson and Clover" cover, with the picture jacket. In my head I hear "Hanky Panky" as it sounded on my 9" transistor radio when I was eleven. The opening of their hit song "I Think We're Alone Now" is my ringtone. In short, I make no claim to objectivity about the group. <i>Travelin'</i> has a couple of minor hits, which for a change are not even the best songs on the album. It broke into the Billboard Hot 100 in 1970, but I wouldn't really care if it had sold 50 copies and disappeared. In whatever they do, James and his band just bleed rock-and-roll authenticity. (Yes... more Michigan rockers.) Even their most intense forays into psychedelia have a straightforward simplicity that grabs me with the same raw energy of "Hanky Panky" or "Mony Mony." "Under-appreciated" seems like a funny term for a group with numerous Top 40 and Top 10 hits, but that is actually what they are: no one talks about them much, no one comments on James' magical melding of psychedelia with pop, no one credits their instrumental skills or inventive use of studio effects. I'm not sure what's up with that. They're great, and this, their last album, is a classic.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nUpVmMcwQdM?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>10. <b>Tim Buckley</b> - <i>Starsailor</i></p> <p>How did avant-garde classical vocalist Cathy Berberian end up getting a mention by Steely Dan and Tim Buckley? Did they happen to come across her 1967 recording of Beatle songs? Whatever the answer, Buckley attributed his efforts at vocal improv on <i>Starsailor</i> to listening to Ms. Berberian. I don't underestimate the challenges of listening to Buckley's recording - especially if you are not familiar with, say, Meredith Monk's <i>Turtle Dreams</i>, or Dame Edith Sitwell's <i>Facade</i>, or other explorations of the boundaries of female vocalization. In 1967 Buckley, age 20, released one of the most brilliant albums of the year, perhaps the decade: <i>Goodbye and Hello</i> consisted of accessible but very unusual folk-related material, with Dylanesque lyrics and a unique acoustic-electronic sound. But he was more intent on experimentation than mass appeal, and <i>Starsailor</i> was the outcome of that, with atonal instrumental jamming and vocal acrobatics that can seem quite random if you are not steeped in that sort of music. Amidst all that he planted a few more standard numbers, in particular the beautiful "Song to a Siren." Buckley is said to have considered the album his masterpiece. If you are a fan of modern classical, or jazz in the spirit of Cecil Taylor and Ornette Coleman, you may not have a problem with that characterization; if not, you will be challenged from almost the first note. I promise it won't bite. It's a unique document, at any rate.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3996&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="_P60XTdyGryCLK3_46q9_dSY7_0BBMpsctkeEp7ftRE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 31 Jan 2021 15:00:00 +0000 Tony Alterman 3996 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3996#comments An L.A. Smile in New York City http://culturecatch.com/node/3998 <span>An L.A. Smile in New York City</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/460" lang="" about="/user/460" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Cochrane</a></span> <span>January 30, 2021 - 17:59</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/literary" hreflang="en">Literary Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/332" hreflang="en">poetry</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2021/2021-01/jerry-brandt-smile.jpg?itok=6BoWOsJ6" width="1200" height="1216" alt="Thumbnail" title="jerry-brandt-smile.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><em><strong>AN L.A. SMILE IN NEW YORK CITY</strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>for Jerry Brandt 1938-2021.</strong></em></p> <p>She looked like a fashion model</p> <p>on her way home from a photo shoot,</p> <p>and if she wasn't one she should have been,</p> <p>blonde hair gracing elegantly tanned shoulders</p> <p>a thing of beauty and desire,</p> <p>and she knew it,</p> <p>as did you and I.</p> <p>Immediately you shot her</p> <p>your best porcelain L.A. smile.</p> <p>She looked at you dismissively</p> <p>like you were a piece of shit</p> <p>and walked haughtily by,</p> <p>and you knew it as did I.</p> <p>Immediately you let rip</p> <p>'What is with this fuckin' city now?</p> <p>You smile at someone and you get that?</p> <p>Things have changed and I just don't understand it'</p> <p>But you did and you had,</p> <p>an elegant man in your mid-sixties</p> <p>with cachet slowly in decline</p> <p>despite the lace shirt and fine shoes.</p> <p>I leant across and whispered</p> <p>'But Jerry it's the way that you were smiling!'</p> <p>infering a piranha sensing dinner,</p> <p>and it became your turn to give me that kind of look.</p> <p>I sensed another outburst brewing</p> <p>but it slowly broadened from insulted shock</p> <p>into a smile accentuated by a lazy shrug</p> <p>as we sauntered on along in fading sunshine.</p> <p>- <em>Robert Cochrane</em></p> <p>30th January 2021.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3998&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="Y9bH-y4LS4oPpxGM22Zj7QUUIDS7EGV9KnxL1uQUsrE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 30 Jan 2021 22:59:31 +0000 Robert Cochrane 3998 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3998#comments Winters at the York Hotel http://culturecatch.com/node/3997 <span>Winters at the York Hotel</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/460" lang="" about="/user/460" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Robert Cochrane</a></span> <span>January 30, 2021 - 12:32</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/literary" hreflang="en">Literary Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/332" hreflang="en">poetry</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2021/2021-01/for-willie-colgan-photo.jpg?itok=xhb0M8hE" width="1200" height="1361" alt="Thumbnail" title="for-willie-colgan-photo.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><em>From the pen of our resident poet and literary critic Robert Cochrane, here's the first in a series of poems from his imprint The Bad Press. </em></p> <p><strong>WINTERS AT THE YORK HOTEL</strong></p> <p><strong>For William 17-06-1915 - 04- 02 -1985</strong></p> <p>Colgan,</p> <p>to those with longer memories</p> <p>was a spoilt boy gone wrong,</p> <p>a raggedy andy,</p> <p>prince of the hedgerows, alcoholic.</p> <p>Homeless for decades since a squandered inheritance,</p> <p>an apple gone sour in his dead parent's eyes,</p> <p>a cadger supreme</p> <p>stinking of meths in a stained overcoat,</p> <p>his cap kneaded like dough</p> <p>should the request require piety.</p> <p>'The York Hotel' he'd quip if quizzed</p> <p>of where he spent his night.</p> <p>When my mother pointed out</p> <p>that 1920's remnant of derelict grandeur</p> <p>I couldn't comprehend</p> <p>how he made the the fifteen miles from the coast</p> <p>to beg a breakfast from her,</p> <p>learnt it was his code for sleeping with</p> <p>the sows in the miller's sty.</p> <p>They kept him warm and probably alive</p> <p>on many a frosty night.</p> <p>Once in dire need of drink</p> <p>he downed the acid from a recently drained battery.</p> <p>The mechanic's distress heard</p> <p>the doctor's resigned admission</p> <p>'I'm sure he's drank worse'</p> <p>and he had, and he did,</p> <p>and would do so again.</p> <p>He got God in the end, and a council house</p> <p>before God got round to him.</p> <p>Gave what testament he could recall</p> <p>from a life once grace itself</p> <p>though fallen from with none.</p> <p>Became almost respectable</p> <p>bar the occasional lapse,</p> <p>like stealing and eating raw mince</p> <p>from our outdoor pantry,</p> <p>old habits of pilfering still strong.</p> <p>Mum banned him after that</p> <p>which both knew amounted to a scolding</p> <p>and a few days exile.</p> <p><em>- Robert Cochrane</em></p> <p>Published via <a href="https://www.thebadpress.co.uk/product-page/a-memory-of-keys-robert-cochrane" target="_blank">The Bad Press</a> in his 2016 collection: <em>Colly McGurk &amp; My Interest In Girls</em></p> <p>Copies £10 plus £2.50 p&amp;p.</p> <p><a href="https://www.thebadpress.co.uk/product-page/a-memory-of-keys-robert-cochrane" target="_blank">Available on request</a>.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3997&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="BqbhUCpxsZU69n4FeHWqKSdN28kI3fuRsbpKGcF5bGY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 30 Jan 2021 17:32:46 +0000 Robert Cochrane 3997 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3997#comments The World Turned Upside Down, Part III http://culturecatch.com/node/3995 <span>The World Turned Upside Down, Part III</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/6959" lang="" about="/user/6959" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Tony Alterman</a></span> <span>January 19, 2021 - 17:53</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/893" hreflang="en">1970</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/V2c32wKM_Bs?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><b>Rock Art</b></p> <p>Please read <b>Part I</b> and the introduction to <b>Part II</b> for a little context. We are exploring the year 1970 in rock, and I have written about the more mainstream trends in <b>Parts I &amp; II</b>. Here we will consider some of the more experimental side of rock in 1970, and what it meant for the future.</p> <p><b>Rock Scratches Acid</b></p> <p>Whatever it is that makes an album "psychedelic," quite a few bands had enough of it to get themselves classified that way in 1970. It would not be long before "<i>neo</i>-" would have to be attached to such efforts, but at this time The Beach Boys, Blue Cheer, The Byrds, The Edgar Broughton Band, Fairfield Parlour, It's A Beautiful Day, Jefferson Starship, Love, Pretty Things, Procol Harum, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Shocking Blue, and Sid Barrett were all in some way trying to carry on the culture of sixties rock. There were feints in this direction from Led Zeppelin, Spooky Tooth, Blues Image, and others as well.</p> <p>That's all very well, but it is clear that this form of rock was past its prime. The Beach Boys <i>Sunflower</i> is no <i>Pet Sounds</i>, or even <i>Today!</i>; Starship somehow flew well below Airplane's jetstream; and even bands like It's A Beautiful Day, Love, and Pretty Things had passed their psychedelic heydays. That leaves one to appreciate what was still alive and kicking all the more. Status Quo released their third album as they transitioned towards hard rock, but <i>Ma Kelly's Greasy Spoon</i> still has a foot in the psychedelic sound that made them famous with "Pictures of Matchstick Men." (They would go on to release thirty more albums -- so far -- as a hard rock band, and set records for charting albums and singles in the U.K.)</p> <p>The Amboy Dukes should not be a psychedelic band, due to the presence of one member who is hardly associated with flower power hippies; nonetheless, <i>Marriage on the Rocks/Rock Bottom</i> offers trippy sounds and an excerpt from Bartok's 2nd String Quartet -- not exactly what you'd expect from an early Ted Nugent effort. (It does contain the song "Get Yer Guns," setting the sights for the double-barreled guitar on the cover of <i>Weekend Warriors</i> and his dubious status as one of the original "Second Amendment people" -- a cause that Grand Funk's Mark Farner would also sign on to in 1976 with "Don't Let 'Em Take Your Gun".)</p> <p>The trailing off of acid rock is probably the single most important factor in the feeling that something grand, something that made the sixties a pinnacle in popular music, was gone, to the great regret of those who had grown up on it. This fact alone was enough to put everything new in a bad light, at least temporarily. But clichéd as it sounds, nothing that great lasts forever, or even very long. Classical music critics railed at Wagner, Liszt and Tchaikovsky too; who needed that kind of noise after Beethoven and Schubert? Once a certain medium has been perfected, once giant monuments like <i>Sgt. Pepper</i>, <i>Surrealistic Pillow</i>, <i>Pet Sounds</i>, <i>Disraeli Gears</i>, <i>Live Dead, </i>and <i>Axis: Bold as Love</i> have been erected, it feels like time to move on. The last thing any band would want to be accused of is a tired effort to mimic those achievements (though there would be plenty of that in years to come). We had no choice but to let it go. It wasn't the death of rock, but it was a melancholy moment that has in some ways shaped our lives. It was also what cleared the path for <i>Dark Side of the Moon</i> and <i>Born to Run</i> and all the later work at that level. None of that could have happened if rock musicians were still trying to sound like The Beatles. The permanent legacy of acid rock is manifold: that it is still enjoyed after more than half a century, by audiences both old and new; that it paved the wave for much of what came after it; and that its progeny continue to seed the airwaves with relevant new music, as Tame Impala and other neo-psychedelic bands have demonstrated.</p> <p><b>Art rock: Erasing the Lines</b></p> <p>"Art rock" is a catch-all term for the unclassifiable efforts of artists who just don't give a pluck what you think they should be doing. All you can say is that it should not <i>clearly</i> be some other brand of rock, though some of it might also be classified as "garage rock." The Velvet Underground, who almost seem like a pop band compared with some of the other entries in this category, released <i>Loaded</i>, their final album with Lou Reed; and it is all but the first Lou Reed album as well. He wrote all the songs on it, including the rock classics "Sweet Jane" and "Rock &amp; Roll". It was perhaps the last stand of sixties rock, but also a hint that creative energy still flowed, as Reed would certainly show in his subsequent work. John Cale too took off in a solo direction, as did members of Soft Machine, with Kevin Ayers and Robert Wyatt each releasing challenging albums that ranged from free form or aleatoric compositions to something approaching standard songwriting. David Bowie gave us <i>The Man Who Sold the World</i>, neither one of his best nor most popular albums, but one that continued to demonstrate an unusually serious artistic vision.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QAO1wLdZROo?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Don Van Vliet, aka Captain Beefheart, followed up his noted <i>Trout Mask Replica</i> with the even beefier <i>Lick My Decals Off, Baby</i>, an album that simply knows no limits, verbal or musical. His pal Frank Zappa delivered the avant-garde effort <i>Weasels Ripped My Flesh</i>, which only in the final tracks devolves into something like ordinary songs. (In one of his typical chameleon turns, he followed it with <i>Chunga's Revenge</i>, an album of just slightly offbeat jazz, blues and rock songs.) If <i>Weasels</i> was not exactly surprising from Zappa, arty folk rocker Tim Buckley went in for a large helping of Cathy Berberian-inspired vocal gymnastics on <i>Starsailor.</i> (If you recognize Berberian's name and are not a fan of avant-garde classical music it might be due to Steely Dan's mention of her in "Your Gold Teeth" on <i>Countdown to Ecstasy</i>.) I will discuss <i>Starsailor</i> at more length later on; here I merely want to note the breadth it suggests for the experimental in popular music at this time.</p> <p>In fact, there was so much classical avant-garde about that the line between that and serious rock composition was being challenged again and again. Building on the earlier experimental efforts by the serial school of Arnold Schoenberg and Americans like Charles Ives, Henry Cowell and Edgard Varèse, a raft of new composers -- Karlheinz Stockhausen, John Cage, Pierre Boulez, Gyorgy Ligeti, Krzysztof Pendercki and Luciano Berio, for instance -- were acquiring popular audiences through concerts in less formal settings, the use of electronics that directly intersected with rock technology, and the use of their compositions in popular films, dance and other media. Self-taught composers like Harry Partch and Moondog built their own instruments, and acquired cult status with younger musicians, sometimes living the semi-vagrant life of street musicians.</p> <p>Rock artists had shown an interest in this trend at least since 1967, and if John Lennon's "Number Nine" was not enough of a sign that it would make its way into the albums themselves, Zappa (who was influenced by Varèse in particular) and Canterbury groups like Soft Machine ensured that there was no longer any doubt about it. In 1969 the members of Spooky Tooth had teamed up with French composer Pierre Henry to produce <i>Ceremony</i>, and in spite of disclaimers by the band, who didn't want it released under their name, much of it is a paradigmatic merger of two apparently incompatible musical genres. The efforts of Kevin Ayers and Robert Wyatt in this direction were also directly inspired by the lively European-American avant-garde classical scene. This was to continue for quite awhile; for example, U.K. teen idol Scott Walker released a traditional solo album in 1970, but much later on re-invented himself as an avant-garde musician.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nUpVmMcwQdM?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>If you don't happen to like these forays into classical experimentation and atonality, you can hold 1970 in contempt for pushing it forward. I was an amateur musician at that time and had no dog in the game; later I was trained as a classical composer and also played in a rock band, so I had two. I still tend to be agnostic about the hybrid form, but I much prefer to hear creative new classical ideas make inroads into rock than to hear bombastic electronic reproductions (or imitations) of more traditional classical pieces, as ELP and a long list of other bands offered. You can knock "Cans and Brahms" off of Yes's <i>Fragile</i> as far as I'm concerned, but I'm fine with the excursions of <i>Weasels</i>, <i>Ceremony, </i>or <i>Starsailor</i>. In any case, it didn't kill rock and roll, which somehow still managed to produce artists as diverse and revolutionary as Steely Dan, Sex Pistols, Kate Bush, and Nirvana. Let a hundred flowers bloom, as a certain Chinese revolutionary once said; it can only infuse the music with new ideas, which still have to survive in the hearts of artists and the popular music market.</p> <p><b>Wheels of Progress</b></p> <p>Caravan is said to have coined the term "progressive rock" in the notes on their debut album in 1968, though I have never seen a good definition of it, nor of the even looser "proto-progressive" that can include almost anything before prog that's not straight pop. If the trend had been moving along in huffs and puffs before 1970, the offerings that year did a lot to get it over the mountain. By February there were prog or proto-prog releases from Van der Graaf Generator, The Strawbs, and Atomic Rooster, later to be joined by work from Quartermass, Barclay James Harvest, Hawkwind, if, Egg, Curved Air, and Colosseum. Among the Canterbury tales were Soft Machine and Caravan, as well as the previously mentioned ex-Soft Machine composers Wyatt and Ayers. And these were just the lesser-known prog bands.</p> <p>This kind of rock music has come in for severe criticism as "orchestral," "technical," "over-produced," "keyboard-driven" (horrors!) and in general, not really rock at all but some highbrow deviation. According to the popular mythology, punk and heavy metal came along to revive rock and deep six prog within the decade. My feeling is we should not get too distracted by all this noise. What prog did was burst the form of the 3-minute, radio-friendly pop song, expand the sonic possibilities of rock instrumentation, exploit electronics that were soon to become standard equipment, and give the entire medium new air to breathe.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yPOSBUVU86M?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>The Moody Blues, early out of the starting gate with the orchestral suite on their 1967 <i>Days of Future Past</i>, released <i>A Question of Balance</i> in 1970. From this album Alison Steele, the DJ usually credited with bringing progressive rock to mass audiences, adapted part of "Dawning Is the Day" as theme music. King Crimson, far from silent after 1969's stunning <i>In the Court of the Crimson King</i>, came up with two sets, <i>In the Wake of Poseidon</i> (which was in some ways a reboot of <i>Court</i>) in May, and <i>Lizard</i> in December. Pink Floyd's <i>Atom Heart Mother</i>, with its almost entirely instrumental first side, did as much as any album to create the prog-rock brand.</p> <p>New prog efforts were a dime a dozen now. <i>Time and a Word</i>, the new album from Yes, was a kind of proto-prog statement, but one that gave much evidence of the expanding harmonic and technical vocabulary that would become the band's signature, and it lacked nothing in great songwriting. Emerson Lake and Palmer debuted with <i>ELP</i>, still a prog classic, while Gentle Giant and Supertramp each released their eponymous first albums. Genesis produced <i>Trespass</i>, sometimes considered their first prog album. Jethro Tull, a three-legged animal with a foot in prog, one in Scottish folk music and another in basic hard rock, released <i>Benefit</i>, where one could hear the distant rumblings of their more proggy later efforts like <i>Aqualung</i>, <i>Thick As a Brick</i> and <i>Minstrel in the Gallery</i>.</p> <p>Together, these bands put out a series of albums in the 1970s that together constitute an essential component of what we mean by "rock" today. Their efforts, for the most part, veered away from the purely experimental, the lengthy electronic and orchestral suites, and managed to deliver highly listenable and emotionally powerful music, displaying instrumental prowess and technical wizardry without losing the thread of inherent musicality. No matter what I liked earlier, later, or at the same time, without <i>Dark Side of the Moon</i>, <i>Every Good Boy Deserves Favor</i>, <i>Close to the Edge</i>, <i>Starless and Bible Black</i>, <i>The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway</i>, <i>Thick As a Brick</i>, and several lesser known prog efforts (Nektar's <i>Remember the Future</i>, Gentle Giant's <i>A Free Hand</i>) rock would seem to me a different and significantly less exciting form of music. It would be, roughly, like classical music without the late romantic, which is to say, music inhibited from exploring the limits of what it can do. The best of prog rock is comparable to the quality of the best popular music in the 1960s.</p> <p>The argument against prog, as I have always seen it, to the extent that it has any validity at all, applies not to those bands, nor to the more challenging Canterbury groups, but to later efforts that came off more and more as spiritually empty imitations of the genre. That, in short, defines what I always held to be a more serious decline of rock's core: the later seventies efforts of Kansas, Rush, Toto, Styx, Journey, Steve Miller, Gary Wright, and others not worth mentioning. To implicate the artistry of a Robert Fripp, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman, Ian Anderson, Roger Waters or Peter Gabriel on the basis of what prog devolved into seems to me a terrible mistake. Marx, correcting Hegel's claim that great historical figures always appear twice, added "the second time as farce." Not much more needs to be said about late-'70s prog.</p> <p><b>Soul Is Saved</b></p> <p>What has come to be called "R&amp;B" was more commonly known as soul music at this time, and nearly all of it was in some way connected with the Motown label or its offshoots. Throughout the 1960s it had been generally oriented toward hit singles, and many of the most famous performers were singers only, with instruments played by the studio musicians collectively known as the Funk Brothers. In this they were comparable to a lot of early white rock groups, including the Beach Boys, whose album instrumentals were often filled in by studio musicians like the Wrecking Crew, or, in England, by the ubiquitous future members of Led Zeppelin. Soul music could be rather formulaic, but as pop formulas go, Motown teams like Holland-Dozier-Holland, or Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, were among the best ever.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BzsmciMNAGU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>But 1970 was a year of change in soul music. It was the year that Diana Ross left the Supremes, that Parliament and Funkadelic became quasi-independent bands (albeit with the same members), and that Curtis Mayfield put out his first solo album after leaving the Impressions. A group of kids named the Jacksons were making hit records. It was also a year that both jazz and psychedelia made deep inroads into R&amp;B. Not all of this was salutary, but change was in the air, and some of it was revolutionary. (That's why I chose to include soul music in this part of the series, on the more experimental side of rock.)</p> <p>A list of the top soul singles of 1970 is a stunning collection of memorable songs: "Psychedelic Shack" (The Temptations), "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" (Diana Ross), "Them Changes" (Buddy Miles), "One Less Bell to Answer" (the Fifth Dimension), "Don't Let the Green Grass Fool You" (Wilson Pickett), "I'll Never Fall in Love Again" (Dione Warwick), "Didn't I (Blow Your Mind This Time)" (The Delfonics), "Rainy Night in Georgia" (Brook Benton), "Signed, Sealed, Deliver'd, I'm Yours" (Stevie Wonder), "O-ooh Child" (The Stairsteps), and "Give Me Just a Little More Time" (Chairmen of the Board). (I've ignored most remakes and releases from Greatest Hits albums.) That could be a year's worth of great cuts in itself, and nearly rivals the output of much more numerous white rock groups.</p> <p>The Temptations released <i>Psychedelic Shack</i>, a departure from their previous sound; it contained not only the dynamite title track and a mostly spoken-word version of their later hit "It's Summer," but the powerful antiwar funk masterpiece "War," which the label refused to let them release as a single for fear of alienating conservatives in The Temptations' audience. Parliament's first album in their new incarnation as a psychedelic soul band -- and their last for four years due to contractual issues -- was originally called <i>Osmium</i> (later reissued under other titles) and is a good companion to The Temptations psychedelic entry. Funkadelic's first two albums were both released in 1970: the first one is a kind of wild musical party, while the second wins awards for most original song title ("Free Your Mind and Your Ass Will Follow") and best musical impression of an acid trip (apparently they all were, throughout the recording). It could be considered an alternative rock/soul masterpiece, and has drawn high ratings from many music review sites.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/j-VwHqSY8vU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>There were other new sounds brewing as well: Isaac Hayes, Curtis Mayfield, and Quincy Jones all released albums that had little to do with the old Motown sound (or the new "Philadelphia Sound" for that matter). The differences were fairly dramatic -- freedom in instrumentation, song form, song length and expressive qualities, undermining the authority of the tambourine-backed pop single. On the other hand, Marvin Gaye's 1970 entry, <i>That's the Way Love Is</i>, still seems constrained by tradition. But before the year was out he had begun work on <i>What's Going On?</i>, which blew the roof off '60s soul and is widely considered one of the most important albums in recording history. That alone makes 1970 a critically important year in soul. Mayfield, too, was already off in dynamic new directions on his first solo LP, <i>Curtis</i>, a soul masterpiece that I will have more to say about it later.</p> <p>And yet... and yet... the psychedelic turn and the new jazz-inflected soul may still be just minor ripples compared with the rogue wave of rap poetry unleashed as the decade flipped. The most revolutionary development, literally and musically, was that both Gil Scott-Heron and The Last Poets released their first albums, spoken-word efforts that included (respectively) "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised" and "When the Revolution Comes," thereby initiating rap poetry as the sound of an angry black working class. The line to Kendrick Lamar may not exactly be straight as an arrow but with all due respect to DJs and their mixtapes, Sugarhill Gang, Marcy Playground and all that, hindsight says this is where it really started.</p> <p>Reggae, too, was in full swing by 1970, but it would be a couple of years before it had a significant impact among rock audiences. After Jimmy Cliff's 1972 soundtrack for <i>The Harder They Come</i> and Bob Marley &amp; the Wailers' 1973 album <i>Burnin'</i> reggae became a standard part of the European-American music scene.</p> <p>If I have not made my point by now, I supposed it can't be made. While regrets in 1970 were natural after a decade that saw a revolution in music, and culture in general, it was not merely a good, but a truly great year for music. Much of what began then unleashed a flood of creative energy that showered the decade to come with outstanding new rock releases. Perhaps I should just issue a confident "Case closed"; but, unwilling to rest on my laurels, in <b>Part IV</b> I will discuss some under-the-radar masterpieces of that year, whose 50<sup>th</sup> anniversaries are well worth celebrating alongside those of <i>Déja Vu</i>, <i>Layla,</i> and the like.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3995&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="uFXe2xqtAT5SJc0aEGqnjxpXnQP3HBHs5fzDcHH8IxY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 19 Jan 2021 22:53:04 +0000 Tony Alterman 3995 at http://culturecatch.com http://culturecatch.com/node/3995#comments