Dusty Wright's Culture Catch - Smart Pop Culture, Video & Audio podcasts, Written Reviews in the Arts & Entertainment http://culturecatch.com/node/feed en Marini’s Magic http://culturecatch.com/node/3900 <span>Marini’s Magic</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/349" lang="" about="/user/349" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dom Lombardi</a></span> <span>December 8, 2019 - 17:21</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/280" hreflang="en">sculptor</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="428" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-12/marini-arcadian-nudes.jpg?itok=KrWIgy31" title="marini-arcadian-nudes.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="600" /></article><figcaption>Photo: Dario Lasagni</figcaption></figure><p>Marino Marini: <em>Arcadian Nudes</em></p> <p>Center for Italian Modern Art, NYC</p> <p>A lot has been written and said about the art of Marino Marini (1901-1980). For me, his most emblematic subject: a heroic or happy male figure atop an equally confident horse always felt like a symbolic bridge between the modes of a vaunted past and the precariousness or promise of the present. Before visiting this exhibition, I was much less aware of his female nudes that were produced between 1932 and 1949, many of which are here, placed beautifully in a well designed and very inviting environment.</p> <p>In contemplating these works, one must consider the state and fate of Europe between 1932 and 1949. In addition, Marini was not poor, far from it. This was how he was able to produce so much work in various media including life-sized bronzes. With all this considered, it is plain to see just how accomplished Marini was with his craft and aesthetic. There is something that I feel here, that I can only describe as truthful beauty as I walk amongst his works. And unlike the man and horse series, there is almost no whimsy present, save for the one reclining sculpture that appears to be somewhat playful. It is quite amazing, how Marini references the classics in art, while he blends in the contemporary; or how he selectively causes havoc with the surfaces of his sculptures by adding or etching in texture by smoothing out or digging into his various chosen materials. However, it is most of all, the way in which he carefully and intimately addresses his audience through his subjects -- that is the real magic of Marini.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1533" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-12/marini-susanna.jpg?itok=k1pXAFMp" title="marini-susanna.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Susanna, 1943, cast 1946-51, Bronze, 28 7/8 x 21 1/8 x 10 5/8" , 68 lb , Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn 1966, Photo: Lee Stalsworth</figcaption></figure><p>And there is another very odd feeling I am experiencing -- it is as if some of the sculptures are casting a mild spell on me. And that is strange, because the least representational elements of all the work is often the rather stylized facial features, while the bodies in general, are far more naturalistic and unimposing as you can see in Marini's <i>Susanna</i> (1943) (on loan from the Hirshhorn Museum &amp; Sculpture Garden), or <i>Figura Seduta (Seated Figure)</i> (1944). And this is key to his intention, the naturalism of the bodies, how familiar they look -- it is almost like one feels a personal relationship with the "person" Marini is placing in front of you. The naturalism is even more apparent in the seated figures, where tummies are not tucked in, and excess weight is, in various degrees, allowed to gather in the midsections, while the poses of many of the works are not so "posed" -- these are the strongest elements of the modern side of his thinking.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-12/marini-giovinetta-1938.jpg?itok=I9UwRJWL" title="marini-giovinetta-1938.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="762" /></article><figcaption>Giovinetta (Young Lady), 1938, gesso, 61 13/16 x 18 29/32 x 14 9/16", Fondazione Marino Marini - Pistoia</figcaption></figure><p>As I alluded to earlier, there is always that sense of a nod to the past in these works, perhaps as far back as the Greco-Roman age as evidenced in the subtle sway of the hips, the confident stare in the faces or the "eroded" surfaces and missing arms and heads. What we do not see here from the ancients is the royalty, the implied greatness of the subject in terms of collective, compiled history. In its place, what remains so clearly in these sculptures, is the presence of the subject's soul. All of the works have an unmistakable timeless essence that we all now, fortunately, can fully appreciate and enjoy, as each work breaks the plane between the day they were created to the moments of engagement today, entering our lives, forever present in our minds and memory.</p> <p><em>Marino Marini: Arcadian Nudes runs through the 13<sup>th</sup> of June, 2020. The Center for Italian Modern Art is located at 421 Broome Street (4<sup>th</sup> floor) in New York City.</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3900&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="_mO8iWmYkwXt591o1cgkOuapu5mJ_yHtSWvD_r9wZbQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 08 Dec 2019 22:21:58 +0000 Dom Lombardi 3900 at http://culturecatch.com Prog Me Two Times! http://culturecatch.com/node/3899 <span>Prog Me Two Times!</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/ian-alterman" lang="" about="/users/ian-alterman" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ian Alterman</a></span> <span>December 6, 2019 - 21:02</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/629" hreflang="en">prog rock</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D_5kc3tleEY?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>In the category of "better late than never," here, finally, is the follow-up to my original article on Culture Catch from 2007. In that article, I noted that "as punishment for the insane level of angst this is causing me, I have blackmailed Dusty: if he wants me to do this, he has to accept <i>two</i> lists: one of 'classic' prog, and one of 'neo-prog,' since the latter is a major subset all to itself." I added (a bit too hopefully it seems) that "the latter list will follow in a few weeks." I don't know if 624 can be considered "a few," but that is how many weeks it has been.</p> <p>In order to get some sense of what I am about to offer, it would help (a lot) to read the <a href="http://culturecatch.com/music/essential-progressive-rock-listening-guide" target="_blank">introduction to my original article</a>, in which I offer a working definition of "progressive rock."</p> <p>That said, let me get to it.</p> <p>Obviously, "neo-progressive" rock is of a time period sometime after seminal or "classic" progressive rock. And while it may seem odd, there is even less agreement on when neo--prog began than on when classic prog began. Classic prog initially developed out of the early and mid-period efforts of artists such as Frank Zappa, The Moody Blues, Pink Floyd, and a few others in the mid-1960s. <em>Sgt. Pepper </em>is also cited (correctly, in my opinion) as being a proto-prog album, though I would argue that parts of The Beatles' <em>Revolver</em> may qualify as well. It is important to note that another "thread" of prog was being developed simultaneously by what became known as the Canterbury School in England. And there are additional threads that came out of Germany and Italy in particular. In any case, classic prog developed during the mid-to-late 1960s, and is generally agreed to have had its "absolute" beginning with King Crimson's debut album<i>, In the Court of the Crimson King.</i></p> <p>"Neo-prog" is not as easy to pin down. Classic prog reached its apotheosis in the early to mid 1970s, but died a heinous death at the hands of disco beginning in the mid-1970s and boy bands and corporately manufactured music (including many solo female arists) in the late 1970s and early 1980s. True, some of the classic prog bands were still out there, putting out albums (some of them superb and highly important and influential) and playing concerts (some among the highest-grossing concerts of all time). And at least two "new" prog bands arose during this period, Canada's Rush (who were highly influential in at least one or two subgenres of neo-prog), and, to a somewhat lesser degree, Kansas. As well, bands such as Pallas, Twelfth Night, Solstice, Quasar and Pendragon had begun putting out what would later come to be considered the beginnings of neo-prog.  But neo-prog is usually said to have begun in earnest in 1983 with the near-simultaneous release of Marillion's <i>Script for a Jester's Tear </i>and IQ's <i>Tales From the Lush Attic</i>. These were quickly followed by a wealth of new  progressive, or "neo-prog" bands, including Arena, Spock's Beard, Flower Kings, Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree, Echolyn, and Transatlantic, as well as a wealth of non-English and non-American bands, such as PFM and Deus ex Machina (Italy), Anglagard (Sweden), Ark (Norway), Magma and Gong (France), and Tangerine Dream and Can (Germany), among many, many others.</p> <p>One interesting fact about neo-prog is that a great many of the bands were influenced specifically by Genesis, Pink Floyd, Yes, The Moody Blues and Gentle Giant (in that order). Even more interesting is that the "sound" that many of the Genesis-influenced bands adopted came from  two specific albums, <i>Trick of the Tail</i> and, especially, <i>Wind &amp; Wuthering. </i>Not even my truly brilliant colleagues at prograrchives.com can figure out why that is. (Although it is true that the "sound" Genesis achieves on <i>Wind &amp; Wuthering</i> is extraordinary.)</p> <p>One issue with choosing an "absolute" list for neo-prog, as opposed to classic prog, is the sheer number of subcategories of the genre.  In choosing my list, I have kept to the same philosophy as I did in my classic prog list: "Imagine yourself -- a progressive rock aficionado -- on that hypothetical desert island to which you can only take a given number of albums (usually around a dozen). Now imagine that you are going to share that island with someone who has a keen interest in, but little real knowledge of, neo-progressive rock music, and you are looking to choose the dozen or so absolutely essential albums that will not only serve to give this person a fairly broad perspective of neo-prog. but will not become tedious after a few hundred listenings: i.e, the cream of the genre." That last part is critical.  So that was my goal.</p> <p>Finally, as before, I have derived my list by choosing what I believe to be the dozen or so most “essential” neo-prog bands, and choosing what I believe to be their most important or representative works.  This time, however, the albums are listed in alphabetical order by artist. So, off we go: the dozen neo-prog “Desert Island Discs” -- some of the absolutely essential neo-progressive rock albums. And even more so than last time, I expect to have lots of CDs by unchosen bands and albums thrown violently at my head. But that's okay, I am at peace with my choices, and will enjoy them whether you do or not.</p> <p><b>I. Neo-Prog (1983-?)</b></p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/otdxVuSFRYk?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>The Church <em>Priest=Aura </em>(1992)</strong> </p> <p>:Although The Chruch had been putting out albums since 1981, and their 1983 album <i>Séance</i> had definite elements of neo-prog, it was not until this, their seventh album, that they entered the realm of neo-prog -- with a vengeance. With bassist-songwriter Steve Kilbey's amazing lyrics and chord progressions, and a new highly atmospheric sound that simply envelopes the listener, The Church would go on to become a driving force in neo-prog from this point on. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>Forget Yourself</i>, 2003)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jSpfFSWU1TM?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Deus ex Machina: <em>Equilibrismo da Insofferenza</em> (1998)</strong></p> <p>I simply had to include at least one of the non-English, non-American neo-prog bands. And it doesn't get much more non-English-speaking than an Italian singer almost screaming lyrics in Latin. But don't be fooled. This quintet is among the most musically and technically accomplished groups you are ever likely to hear (their drummer, Claudio Trotta, may well be among the best drummers in the world), and their writing is as ultra-progressive as anything ever written. This is complicated, sophisticated stuff, and their catalogue is well worth delving into. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>Cinque</i>, 2002)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bktMpOrFofo?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Dream Theater: <em>Metropolis Pt. 2: Scenes From a Memory</em> (1999)</strong></p> <p>I never thought I would like "metal" music in any form. Yet Dream Theater, almost unarguably the leader in the subgenre of metal neo-prog, is something different: a truly "musical" metal band. Even guitarist John Petrucci's speed metal guitar is more melodic than anything I have ever heard in the genre. And Mike Portnoy (now sadly gone from the group) is definitely the most melodic speed metal drummer ever. This album is not simply a brilliant concept album, but is included in another list I hope to present, the greatest concept albums of all time. It ranks up there with Pink Floyd's <i>Dark Side of the Moon</i> and <i>The Wall</i>, Jethro Tull's <i>Thick as a Brick</i>, Genesis' <i>The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway</i>, and Marillion's <i>Brave </i>(see entry below). (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>Systematic Chaos</i>, 2007)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cyx1r1f7V7k?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>IQ: <em>Dark Matter</em> (2004)</strong></p> <p>As noted in my introduction, IQ was one of the progenitors of neo-prog. So this was among my two most difficult choices by far. Every album beginning with <i>Seventh House</i> (2000) is worthy of inclusion. I chose <i>Dark Matter</i> because I think it respectably represents what IQ was and is about. A somewhat "darker" view, and a "heavier" sound, occasionally even approaching "metal." They remain one of my three favorite currently active progressive bands.  And Peter Nicholls is my favorite neo-prog vocalist. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>The Road of Bones</i>, 2014)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D_5kc3tleEY?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p> </p> <p><strong>Marillion: <em>Misplaced Childhood</em> (1985)</strong></p> <p>I am giving myself two picks here (both of them difficult, for the same reason as my pick for IQ), since Marillion has had two very separate lives. The first one included their original lead singer and songwriter, Fish. Of the four albums he recorded with them, this is the one that I believe does him the most justice as a songwriter, lyricist, and singer. It is a quasi-concept album, and shows off Marillion's early style of Genesis influence, filtered through their own prog sensibilities. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <em>Clutching at Straws</em>, 1987)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ycNDhICNwf0?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Marillion: <em>Brave</em> (1994)</strong></p> <p>Marillion's second life began with the departure of Fish and the arrival of singer-songwriter Steve Hogarth (simply referred to as "h"). And it took just three albums for him to come up with not only Marillion's best mid-period album, but one of the greatest concept albums ever written. Taking off on the true-life news story about a girl found wandering on an English bridge, who did not know who she was or where she came from, and otherwise refused to speak on her own behalf, Hogarth wrote a back story that is simply one of the most spine-tingling and sometimes breath-taking quasi-musicals you will ever hear. The album is filled with lyrical, musical and sonic brilliance. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>Marbles</i>, 2004)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RKsBl_HMKTY?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Mars Volta: <em>Amputecture</em> (2006) </strong></p> <p>When Mars Volta released their first album, <i>De-Loused in the Crematorium</i> (2003), the response from critics and prog fans alike was, one either loves it or hates it, there is no in between.  It was among the most unexpected and (to many) unintelligible neo-prog debuts ever. But for those who "got it," it signaled the entry of a formidable new progressive band, and sound. Their approach had more in common with King Crimson than with Genesis, and their sonics were among the most dissonant and innovative in quite some time. Led by singer-songwriter Cedric Bixler-Zavala and guitarist-songwriter-producer Omar Alfredo Rodriguez-Lopez, the band took an unapologetically uber-progressive approach to their music, which shows in both the often schizoid lyrical and songwriting style, and the extremely technical virtuosity required of every player who recorded with them, not least the frighteningly brilliant guitarist John Frusciante. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <em>Octahedron</em>, 2009)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cQhqsczPm1M?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Neal Morse: <em>Sola Scriptura</em><i> </i>(2007)</strong></p> <p>Neal Morse is the busiest progressive rock artist out there. In addition to his own output, he was a founding member of Spock's Beard (see below), a founding member of Transatlantic (see below), and has recorded with his own band (The Neal Morse Band) and with Flying Colors. Both Transatlantic and Flying Colors are "super groups" of some of the top currently active progressive rock artists. Morse is a Christian minister, and his solo output is what could be classified as Christian progressive rock.  However, it is completely approachable by anyone. Among those albums, this is the most interesting and exciting. Morse is uncompromising in his approach to progressive writing, and his solo work is among the best prog out there today. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>Momentum</i>, 2012)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2G5hHEuG65I?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Pendragon: <em>The Masquerade Overture</em> (1996)</strong></p> <p>As noted, Pendragon is among the earliest of the neo-prog bands. Their 1985 album, <i>The Jewel</i>, is considered almost as seminal as the debut albums of Marillion and IQ. However, although some of their other albums were also critical in building their reputation, it was <i>The Masquerade Overture</i> that cemented their standing as a standard-bearer of neo-prog. A concept album, many progressive rock fans consider this among the best neo-prog albums of all time. Given the range of musical motifs and emotions the album covers, it is difficult to argue with that assessment. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice<i>: The Window of Life</i>, 1993)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GMEwM3YHiME?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Porcupine Tree: <em>Deadwing</em> (2005)</strong>.</p> <p>Steven Wilson may be the second busiest progressive rock artist after Neal Morse. In addition to founding Porcupine Tree, which, like The Church, has become a standard-bearer for neo-prog, Wilson is also the founder of Blackfield and Opeth, and somehow also finds time to produce and/or remix albums by many other artists, most notably King Crimson. And although Wilson had put Porcupine Tree through a number of style iterations, from its early experimental albums to its heavier, even quasi-metal style, <i>Deadwing</i> is the album that probably did the most to bring them to the masses.  It is uncompromising in its strength and heavy atmospheric rock style, and every song is a gem. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>In Absentia,</i> 2002)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KLiS6YbBecU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Spock's Beard: <em>The Light</em> (1995)</strong></p> <p>Although it is true of many neo-prog bands, with Spock's Beard the best place to begin really is the beginning, with their debut album, which sets out their style perfectly. The album includes not just one but two extended conceptual compositions, "The Light," and "The Water." As noted above, the driving force in Spock's Beard for at least its first few albums was co-founder Neal Morse (see entry above). But Spock's Beard was truly a group effort, and each member contributes his own stylistic approach to the whole. (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>Snow</i>, 2002)</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zIN0I8Cvotg?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p><strong>Transatlantic: <em>The Whirlwind</em> (2009)</strong></p> <p>Transatlantic is a neo-progressive rock "supergroup" comprised of keyboardist Neal Morse (Spock's Beard), bassist Pete Trewavas (Marillion), guitarist Roine Stolt (Flower Kings), and drummer Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater). Almost needless to say, everything they have done is great neo-prog and worth a listen. However, it was their third album that really brought everything together. Working from a Christian concept (care of minister Neal Morse, but fully endorsed by the other members, all of whom are Christians of one ilk or another), the writing on <i>Whirlwind </i>is the strongest they have done, unrelenting in its refusal to be pinned down within progressive rock. Some passages are absolutely breath-taking in their complexity and technical virtuosity.  (2<sup>nd</sup> choice: <i>SMPT:e</i>, 2000)</p> <p>And there you have it. As noted, I realize that many people will argue with my choices, and I fully admit that I have left much out. Maybe I will do follow-ups to both of my lists. Watch this space.</p> <p>And there you have it. As noted, I realize that many people will argue with my choices, and I fully admit that I have left much out. Maybe I will do follow-ups to both of my lists. Watch this space.</p> <p>Peace.</p> <p><em>Mr. Alterman is a Senior Writer and a founding moderator of Progarchives.com, the number one progressive rock website in the world. He writes there under the name Maani. (Don’t ask.) He has been a contributor to Culture Catch since 2007.</em></p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3899&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="xYCzJhT5T0dOMg70RCNwJf1VYqiW15Kiu7wqFjuVo8U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 07 Dec 2019 02:02:52 +0000 Ian Alterman 3899 at http://culturecatch.com Can Anyone Hear Me? http://culturecatch.com/node/3898 <span>Can Anyone Hear Me?</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/leah-richards" lang="" about="/users/leah-richards" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Leah Richards</a></span> <span>December 2, 2019 - 12:11</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/theater" hreflang="en">Theater Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/88" hreflang="en">off broadway</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-12/listening_room-al_foote_iii_photography.png?itok=XIFH648r" title="listening_room-al_foote_iii_photography.png" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo credit: Al Foote III</figcaption></figure><p><i>The Listening Room</i></p> <p>Written by Michaela Jeffery</p> <p>Directed by Ivette Dumeng and Lori Kee</p> <p>Presented by Nylon Fusion Theatre Company at The New Ohio Theatre, NYC</p> <p>November 30-December 21, 2019</p> <p>Characters in the work of Samuel Beckett often tell their stories as a way of proving or leaving a record that they existed. Michaela Jeffery's <i>The Listening Room </i>expands such concerns to an entire civilization, limning dystopia on an epic scale through the intense interactions of a handful of characters who occupy the titular, bunker-like room. Making its New York premiere in repertory with another science-fiction play, Steven Mark Tenney's <i>ray gun say0nara</i>, at The New Ohio Theatre, <i>The Listening Room </i>explores the weaponization of information, history, narrative, and memory alongside the potentiality of dissent, resistance, and revolution, resonating, as much good speculative fiction does, both with and beyond our present moment. </p> <p>Civilization in <i>The Listening Room</i> is concentrated in the Earie -- originally founded, according to its own origin myths and prior to "the Collapse," as a better alternative to a self-destructive society -- is surrounded by nothing but desert for, as one character claims, thousands of miles and is ruled by the Council. The Listening Room is located miles from the Earie, and the teenaged Listeners who live there are tasked with listening to and sending written reports to the Council on fragments of transmissions picked up by large dishes called "ears." While the Council no longer authorizes new Listeners, a young blind girl named Isobel (Sara Rahman) arrives at the Listening Room from the Earie, where she is discovered by Fayette (Matthew Carrasco), who tries to force her to leave. She claims to have been invited to become a Listener by Marcus (Tim Palmer), the most vocal anti-Council advocate among the group, which also includes Rouke (Taylor Petracek) and Lanolin (Alex Chernin), who acts as the Recorder (much of the population of the Earie is illiterate, the better, as Marcus tells it, to keep them subjugated). There is skepticism among the Listeners (and would-be Listener Isobel) that they are indeed living in an era of unprecedented freedom, as their government asserts. When Marcus is summoned to answer an accusation of criminality, it forces this group of young people into an accelerated decision about whether they will take action.</p> <p>The Listeners' conflicts, which occasionally turn physical in well-choreographed fights that also underscore the characters' youth, weave together a range of thematic considerations, from choice and self-determination (including the dispensation granted to Listeners to choose new names for themselves) to the manipulation of public perception and, thus, behavior, including in legal matters (exiling a minor, for instance, is more palatable than executing one) and particularly through the use of fear and the foregrounding of nebulous threats (this should all sound very familiar), as well as the preservation and significance of individual, social, and even cosmic histories. The set design, by Raye Lavine and LiLi Jackson, is fantastic, with its ladder to the surface, wall of cubbies, and jumble of electronic equipment; and its atmosphere is augmented by excellent lighting that makes use of blues, oranges, and reds and sound design that includes a constant low background hum. Palmer and Chernin stand out among a strong cast, with Carrasco and Petracek providing contrasting foils to Palmer's cocky, idealistic Marcus and Rahman doing convincing work with both Isobel's visual impairment and her quietly fiery determination.</p> <p><i>The Listening Room </i>depicts a world in which a person's value corresponds to their contribution and their conformity, and in which an omnipresent sense of threat hinders mobilization for change. While Rouke may have a point when he argues that while anyone can smash things, it's also necessary to have a plan for what comes next, Marcus makes the equally valid point that it is far too easy to justify continued inaction, that masses of individuals going about their daily routines merely reinforces stasis in the end. In the play, stories are records of the past that can point the way to the future, and what we listen for and how we interpret and (re)present what we hear determines what kind of future that will be. <i>The Listening Room</i> itself is one such story, and it is well worth lending it your ears (and eyes).</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3898&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="s_RNvXb-fz-v4uH1fuYYK735_mZ3NQUmbyAZSl_cc4E"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 02 Dec 2019 17:11:17 +0000 Leah Richards 3898 at http://culturecatch.com Happy Thanksgiving 2019! http://culturecatch.com/node/3839 <span>Happy Thanksgiving 2019!</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/webmaster" lang="" about="/users/webmaster" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Webmaster</a></span> <span>November 27, 2019 - 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/literary" hreflang="en">Literary Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/96" hreflang="en">cartoon</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-11/krimstein-t-day.jpg?itok=ux6QYz-H" width="1200" height="900" alt="Thumbnail" title="krimstein-t-day.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Ken's critically-lauded new graphic novel <a href="http://www.kenkrimstein.com" target="_blank"><em>The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth</em></a> (Bloomsbury Publishing) is available for consumption in many languages all over the globe. Order it and his previous book -- the very astute <i><a href="http://www.afishwithlegs.com/" target="_blank">Kvetch as Kvetch Can</a> -- </i>through his <a href="http://www.kenkrimstein.com" target="_blank">website</a> link or at Amazon, et al.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3839&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="R1F-UkLZlpwQmjBrFG_QEscYae_mk08Gk0nwLR2jv6g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 27 Nov 2019 15:00:00 +0000 Webmaster 3839 at http://culturecatch.com Song of the Week: "Something I Should Do" http://culturecatch.com/node/3897 <span>Song of the Week: &quot;Something I Should Do&quot;</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>November 19, 2019 - 17:14</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/769" hreflang="en">pop rock</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C1YIf-AIH18?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>If you're a regular CC reader then you know my devotion to the band <a href="http://www.nadasurf.com" target="_blank">Nada Surf</a>. Well, the NYC-based indie pop rock quartet --  Matthew Caws, Daniel Lorca, Ira Elliot, and longtime friend and collaborator, Louie Lino -- have done it again. Another gem. Somehow they've managed to meld The Cars (synth hook) with The Byrds (harmonies) and still keep it all sounding fresh. It's rockin' and relentless -- guitars, bass, drums, and that damn snakey-synth hook that keeps weaving in and out. Even a clever "rap" break rant about the perils of social media work. And a way simple, but clever lyric video, too, animated and edited by Jonny Sanders. "Something I Should Do" is the first track from the new/ninth Nada Surf album <em>Never Not Together</em> available February 7, 2020. And their 6-month world tour starts on January 14th in Seattle. </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3897&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="Bri76zPMUWb3MGiHlYfhdVPwsD5QXZe2gbcUCeSRnVI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 19 Nov 2019 22:14:40 +0000 Dusty Wright 3897 at http://culturecatch.com The Rube Is On http://culturecatch.com/node/3896 <span>The Rube Is On</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/349" lang="" about="/user/349" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dom Lombardi</a></span> <span>November 15, 2019 - 21:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/280" hreflang="en">sculptor</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="722" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-11/rube-goldberg_1.jpg?itok=wnIgCL4U" title="rube-goldberg_1.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="926" /></article><figcaption>The Art of Rube Goldberg, Queens Museum, (l-r) Charles Kochman, Jennifer George &amp; Creighton Michael</figcaption></figure><p><i>The Art of Rube Goldberg</i></p> <p>Queens Museum</p> <p>Flushing Meadows–Corona Park, New York</p> <p>Rube Goldberg defied the odds. He was a highly paid and award-winning artist at a time most such practitioners were living hand to mouth. He collapsed the cavernous divide between illustrative or commercial art and fine art with a popular, albeit wildly witty vision. He bridged the gap between engineering and fine art in a way that was both compelling and entertaining to his audience, by inventing compellingly impractical machines to complete mundane tasks. And he eventually became a spokesperson for a number of products such as Luck Strike Cigarettes (Goldberg only smoked cigars) and Old Angus scotch whiskey.</p> <p><br /> Goldberg created some 50,000 works, mostly on paper that were drawn or painted with black ink. You don’t often hear of such a staggering output of work. Myself, I can only think of Picasso, who too amassed such a number, which included paintings, sculptures, collages, prints, ceramics and textiles. And it is also important to note that their eras overlapped: Picasso 1881-1973, Goldberg 1883-1970, while both were the greatest, most recognizable figures of their related fields. </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="638" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-11/rube-goldberg_2.jpg?itok=ym-ZQLDL" title="rube-goldberg_2.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1000" /></article><figcaption>Foolish Questions Postcards (1910), color postcards, 3 ½ x 5 ½ inches, Courtesy of the Queens Museum</figcaption></figure><p>Picasso's legacy can be found in every important museum in the world, or in any volume of Modern Art. Goldberg’s legacy lives largely in the memories and minds of artists, engineers and inventors, people who see the beauty in belaboring a simple task creatively, by employing endless ingenuity. In fact, Rube Goldberg is listed as an adjective in Miriam-Webster's Dictionary, and there is something called the <i>Rube Goldberg Machine Contest</i>, a national competition that occurs every year. In it, six finalists from various colleges and universities compete as they conceive of, design and build machines that turn an everyday task into dozens of otherwise frivolous actions that, when occurring in a crazy continuum of wiggles, waves and whirligigs, completes a uncomplicated task that would normally take a person one or two trouble-free movements or moments to achieve.</p> <p>My renewed enthusiasm in Rube Goldberg's legacy all comes from a recent talk and exhibition I attended at the Queens Museum, which was aptly titled <i>The Art of Rube Goldberg</i>. Conceived of by artist Creighton Michael, curated by the Senior Curator of the Aspen Art Museum, Max Weintraub, and toured by International Arts &amp; Artists, The<i> Art of Rube Goldberg</i> stands as a glowing reminder of just how influential Goldberg was in his day. Like some, I am most familiar with his mesmerizing machines, and was pleased to learn of and see more of his voluminous cartoons and strips that had a distinctive, modern (for its time) and very humorous look at social behavior, human and personified animal mannerisms and all the trials and tendencies we project in terms of class, gender, religion and most importantly relaxation.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="467" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-11/rube-goldberg_3.jpg?itok=F_QwrW8Q" title="rube-goldberg_3.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1000" /></article><figcaption>Confessions of Confirmed Golf Addicts (1919), ink on Paper, 31 ½ x 26 inches, Courtesy of the Queens Museum</figcaption></figure><p>The talk consisted of two presentations. The first was by Jennifer George (Fashion Designer and the artist’s granddaughter, and author of the book, <i>The Art of Rube Goldberg</i>), and Charles Kochman (editorial director of Abrams ComicArts and editor of the book). Both highlighted Goldberg’s education as an engineer, his life as a father and grandfather, and his continued creative influences, which are far-reaching, sometimes anecdotal, and always cross-cultural. The second overview of Goldberg was given by Creighton Michael, with his thoughts of Goldberg's relationship to key art historical figures, pointing to Da Vinci's caricatures that focused on harsh, distorted facial features of everyday people; and Peter Bruegel the Elder’s powerful storytelling ability.</p> <p>Looking forward from Goldberg's influences, I noticed one link between he and Robert Crumb. Not so much in the content, of course, but more so in the absurd levels of social interactions. Crumb does credit Goldberg, among many others of those early cartoonists as influences, and I believe you can see it most easily in works from the incredibly popular, and always stinging and zinging retorts in his <i>Foolish Questions</i> series (1909-1934), or in the wildly reactive fantastical fashion fiasco in <i>Men in Hats at Theater</i> (1926).   </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="667" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-11/rube-goldberg_4.jpg?itok=ch4bmgDn" title="rube-goldberg_4.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Men in Hats at Theater (1926), ink on paper, 31 1/2 x 26 1/8 inches, Courtesy of the Queens Museum</figcaption></figure><p>Then there are the many thousands of cartoons Goldberg created that truly defined an awkward era, revealing a magical mindset that only he could portray. In addition, Goldberg was awarded a Pulitzer in 1948 for his political cartoons, some of which are in the exhibition. The most powerful and timeless work is <i>Jews and Arabs</i> (1947), which depicts two lone figures crossing an endless dessert in parallel paths that one must assume have been forged by generation after generation. The irony here is they are headed in the same direction, unaware of each other's presence despite their relatively close proximity. Profoundly, Goldberg is pointing out both the differences and similarities of the two peoples traveling roads that unfortunately, may never meet.</p> <p>Goldberg also had a postage stamp created in his honor; a color version of one of his most familiar works, <i>Professor Butts and His Self-Operating Napkin</i> (1931). The stamp was issued in 1995, while the original work can be credited in influencing Charlie Chaplin’s great film <i>Modern Times</i> (1936), which features a self-operating napkin machine.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="766" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-11/rube-goldberg_5.jpg?itok=REXvh5fT" title="rube-goldberg_5.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1000" /></article><figcaption>Rube Goldberg Inventions United States Postal Service Stamp (included on sheet of "Comic Classics" stamps) (1995), 7 ⅞ x 7 7/16</figcaption></figure><p>And those machines, oh those machines. They were, and still are transfixing to me, especially the ones that are considered "wearable". For instance, <i>Professor Invention Drawing (An Idea to Keep you from Forgetting Your Wife's Letter)</i> (1930) shows a man who is just about to pass a letter box, as a device he is wearing strapped to his waist goes through over a dozen key points or movements to remind him to mail a letter his wife gave him. What really rings true here is the nod to human nature, how we tend to daydream. Getting lost in one's thoughts, how one forgets what they set out to do as they move from place to place with intended goals, big and small is something anyone can relate to.</p> <p>Goldberg continues to turn minutia into magic with<i> Professor Butts Invention Drawing (Postage Stamps)</i> (1929) that, using various sounds in a mix of progressively bizarre mechanisms, places a moistened stamp on a letter. In this instance, as Creighton Michael pointed out in his presentation, Goldberg utilizes diagonal forces to enhance the movements, while the contrasting dark sides of the two desks helps to both move the eye and create depth.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="416" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-11/rube-goldberg_6.jpg?itok=paBeyKvI" title="rube-goldberg_6.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Professor Butts Invention Drawing (Postage Stamps), 1929, ink on paper, 14 ¾ x 25 ⅝ inches, Courtesy of Queens museum</figcaption></figure><p><i>The Art of Rube Goldberg</i> at the Queens Museum, which also includes film shorts produced by Goldberg, videos of the influences of Goldberg, games, functional objects, books, strips, play money, advertisements, illustrated articles, and archival film clips, and photographs runs through February 9<sup>th</sup>, 2020. Be sure to see it, and the other wonderful exhibitions the museum offers.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3896&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="mpsU02wy2YUkWcScgHxSTt48AYKBZuAx3IuLmaSRc-Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 16 Nov 2019 02:44:18 +0000 Dom Lombardi 3896 at http://culturecatch.com I Know the Difference Between Cantaloupe and Watermelon http://culturecatch.com/node/3895 <span>I Know the Difference Between Cantaloupe and Watermelon</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/6781" lang="" about="/user/6781" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Cearia Scipio</a></span> <span>November 14, 2019 - 09:03</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/theater" hreflang="en">Theater Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/235" hreflang="en">Broadway</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="800" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/2019-11/slave-play-image_0.jpg?itok=3kE1aCRv" title="slave-play-image.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Photo Credit: Matthew Murphy</figcaption></figure><p>Last month a couple of my black friends told me they were going to see a new Broadway show called <i>Slave Play.</i> I asked them why they would want to go see a play about slaves. The response I got was "I heard it's really good." Then I thought to myself, "Ain't nothing good about slavery." My friends came back to me after the show and told me that I'd like it. I had the opportunity to see the play myself this weekend. I needed to see what all the hype was about.</p> <p><i>Slave Play</i> was written by Jeremy O. Harris, a black, male playwright. Walking into the theater, I was silently judging every white person in there. And there were A LOT of white people in the theater. To me it felt like "Dang. They couldn't wait to get in here to see a play about slaves." As a black woman, I'm just a little tired of the "slave narrative." I'm tired of us revisiting a time when black people were seen as property. When the show began with a sweeping black woman dressed in "slave attire," I sank into my seat. Watching her interact with her white scene partner made me feel slightly uncomfortable. I just wanted to get this over with.</p> <p>Then I caught interest in the other two couples. I was surprised by the comedy in the dialogue and the nudity that was shown on stage. Now they had my interest. So I thought, "Cool. This is going to be some sexy slavery tale. I can dig that." Then the play flips everything on its head! The couples were all participating in some sort of interracial couple group therapy. That whole plot is so very clever. I thought the play had a perfect blend of comedic and serious moments. I was paying extra attention now. The two therapists' comedic timing complimented each other well as they tried to navigate what their attendees were feeling.</p> <p>Listening to the stories of the couples was both hilarious and heartbreaking. For example, there was one story that stood out to me. The biracial man, Phillip, is going on about how he went to a white school. He said he never saw himself as a color. He says he was just "Phillip." It wasn't until his white schoolmates pointed out his blackness that he started to see it as well. I've been black my whole life and I've never thought of myself as just "Cearia." I have always thought of myself as "Black Cearia." I think this way because I know that my skin color is the first thing people see. They don't see my personality. They don't see my bank account. They see my skin.</p> <p>My skin color affects how I see the world. I am always inclined to point out differences of race wherever I go. During the previous semester, I performed in City College's production of <i>Dry Land</i>. I wasn't originally cast. I took the spot of a girl who couldn't do the play. During our first table read, the whole cast was present. I looked around the room and I was the only black person in there. Yes, we did have two Latina women but they were white passing. Later on in the semester I found out the identity of whom I was replacing. She was white. I still think about how white that show would have been had I not been in it. Our director was white as well. Maybe it's not her fault that I ended up being the darkest person there, maybe she didn't notice. I noticed. I always notice.</p> <p>Overall, <i>Slave Play</i> empowered me. It was refreshing to see a black woman who was taking control of her life. On stage there was a black woman, who wasn't going to submit to her man, a white man. I silently cheered her on. I stared at her with so much intensity, hoping she could feel the power and respect that I was transferring to her telekinetically from somewhere in the sea of audience members. This play made me feel desirable. It somehow turned on a switch that made me appreciate and love the black body that I walked in with even more.</p> <p><em>Miss Scipio is a 22 year-old aspiring actress who is currently attending City College. Her instagram is @Rotiprincess.</em></p> </div> <section> <a id="comment-1434"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1574113948"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/1434#comment-1434" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">AMAZING</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>I love this article so much, you have such a strong opinion and reading this just enforced that. Please write more!!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1434&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hmX8U_VPXPuv9iLtJMyeD4LD8ZG7Jj0ehYabJtIgbt4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Shantel</span> on November 14, 2019 - 11:33</p> </footer> </article> <a id="comment-1435"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1574113933"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/1435#comment-1435" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">This is perfectly said! As…</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This is perfectly said! As someone who watched this play about a week ago, I completely understand your message and agree. Your passion is instilled in me and has given me another perspective of this eye-opening performance. Once again, well done!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1435&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="IuTJt8GV0jbn2efpJwVCSwPCq5SKJJXwvjc1xVg9Chw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dina Elhadidy</span> on November 14, 2019 - 11:36</p> </footer> </article> <a id="comment-1437"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1574113936"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/1437#comment-1437" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Loved this article and what…</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Loved this article and what you had to say. Will for sure check it out!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1437&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XiLxFoIPZnqbf__a8l3yywkOmytXAe4bbDNkqFLg_Gk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous</span> on November 15, 2019 - 08:36</p> </footer> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3895&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="fgloxnRGpuAYTLBV7sqEJXlEFXRkjKARnjAkk2UxgqY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 14 Nov 2019 14:03:05 +0000 Cearia Scipio 3895 at http://culturecatch.com Music for a Story Running Out of Time: A Conversation with Simon TaufiQue http://culturecatch.com/node/3894 <span>Music for a Story Running Out of Time: A Conversation with Simon TaufiQue</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/6777" lang="" about="/user/6777" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Isabella Huang</a></span> <span>November 11, 2019 - 16:55</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/film" hreflang="en">Film Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/399" hreflang="en">documentary</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/styV7QQpCRU?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>The latest offering from<i> </i>Independent Lens, PBS's weekly documentary television series, is Andrés Caballero and Sofia Khan's <i>The Interpreters</i>, a hard-hitting chronicle of what happened to three of the 50,000 local interpreters the U.S. military employed during the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and then mostly left behind, unprotected by the government that promised them a rosy future.</p> <p>As the filmmakers have noted, "Making this film made us feel a little less hopeful in humanity despite having good outcomes. The reality is that most interpreters are still out there, in hiding, being targeted and killed as they wait for their visas."</p> <p>As Sgt. Paul Braun notes in the documentary:</p> <blockquote> <p>"The interpreters were considered traitors to their country . . . traitors to their religion. They either had to wear a mask over their faces or use fake names. But after a while, people found out who they were."</p> </blockquote> <p>So how does one tell the story of people in time-crunch of their lives? And how does one find the right musical notes to accompany such fear and bravery?</p> <p>Co-producer and composer Simon TaufiQue rises to the task, masterfully enriching the tale of these heroes who put their lives at stake. The British-born, award-winning TaufiQue, who has 53 credits for the scores he wrote for various features features and shorts, took a moment off to sit down for a phone chat with us last week. </p> <p><b>You've have worked on quite a variety of projects such as <i> Jesus Henry Christ, She's Lost Control, </i>and<i> Are You Glad I'm Here</i>. How did you get involved in this project?</b> </p> <p>This is through filmmaker Sofian Khan, the director of this movie. I met him when I was the program director for the South Asian Film Festival 11 years ago . . . . [T]he festival [was] inspiring to young south Asian filmmakers. One of those was Sofian Khan. He was the director of photography for a film called <i>Ramchand Pakistani</i>. . . . [W]e became friends from that point on. . .  and we just stayed in touch. When he had some projects that matched my style of music, we started working together.  After I produced <i>Imperium</i> [with Daniel Radcliffe], we connected and discussed this project. I was so moved by the story and the mission of <i>The Interpreters</i> . . . that I offered whatever I could do to help. I wasn't thinking musically, but as a producer, a fan of his work, and as someone that wants to help tell this story. Along the way I became the composer of the film. That was a couple years ago, meeting for coffee trying to catch up and being swept away by the story. Khan was just shooting it because he wanted to highlight stories that weren't being told.</p> <p><b>How did the soundtrack of <em>The Interpreters</em> evolve?</b> </p> <p>We realized that the story is a very much a real-life thriller. These are people that put their lives on the line to help the US troops and coalition forces, and they are being seen as traitors by fellow countrymen because they are helping the "invaders." They believed in the mission of democracy and changing their country for the better with the help of the United States and other countries. So they took that chance, and then when their turn came to leave the country, when the Americans left, and they knew there'd be a bullseye on their back, they were promised a chance to leave, and the promise wasn't kept.</p> <p>We were trying to tell the story of how these people survived and made sense of that, and how the Americans on the other side were trying to get these people out. It's a ticking-bomb scenario type of film because you don't know how it's going to end or if the people will find their way to safety. That was the impulse behind creating the music for this film. Not just telling the story of Iraq or Afghanistan but telling the story of people who are in a very scary place. They are in a pressure cooker, so they don't know if they'll make it out in time. That sense of urgency, anxiety, but also the story of kinship and love between the Interpreters and their American partners who wanted them to be safe were the impulses behind the music of the film. </p> <p><b>How did you start composing and how did you recognize you wanted a career in composing?</b> </p> <p>Both by accident. I didn't realize that I could be a composer for film until I was asked to write music for film. I got into music by chance, and the thought of having a career in music was a fantasy, and not something I never thought I could be.</p> <p>As a first generation immigrant and first in my family to go to college, there were a lot of expectations that I would have a very stable and secure career, and so I was pursuing political science and economics, double majoring in NYU with the intention of going to law school or graduate school for a career in foreign service. I wanted to be a diplomat, an ambassador, and change things for the better.</p> <p>Along the way in my undergraduate studies, I became really good friends with a young filmmaking student. It turns out he was M. Night Shyamalan. We just were best friends, and he would take me to his film classes, and introduce me to his composer and his team of collaborators.</p> <p>While that was happening, I was becoming more immersed in music as a hobby. I was writing songs; I was playing in band just for fun. Along the way, he asked me to write a song for one of his films, and I got to see how tangible creativity could be as a long-term goal. I thought then that "if I saved enough money, if I got to practice enough, I could someday record some songs and maybe an album or something." Then [Shyaman's] career took off, and we stayed friends; I got to visit his sets. I got to visit the post-production. I got to see how his composer was doing stuff. So just because of being a supportive friend and just being really excited for him, I, by accident, was soaking up all these lessons about creativity and collaboration.</p> <p>Seeing his trajectory from doing stuff that was small scale and easy to digest, and seeing all that catapult and explode into very large scale stuff, but still seeing the same person, creativity, and root source behind it all was very inspiring to me. When I was asked to write music for a friend's film, I jumped at the chance even though I didn't know what I was doing. But because of all of that exposure, I knew what I needed to do. I knew what the film needed, and I somehow was able to cobble together music that made that film a better story.</p> <p><b>I've read that one of your methods of composing is muting the television and playing your guitar along with it. Russian composer Mussorgsky did something similar for his piece "Pictures at an Exhibition." According to Leonard Bernstein, Mussorgsky "tried to compose music that would describe them, in other words, do what a painter would do with paint." How would you compare that to your experiences composing along muted TV Shows?</b> </p> <p>I didn't know that. That is fascinating to hear! It's really inspiring because I was not doing it with the intention of scoring a TV show. I was just practicing guitar and the TV was on, and it was interfering with what I was hearing, so I turned down the volume and just played my scales or chords while looking at the TV, and it influenced what I was playing without me knowing it.</p> <p>So the creative influences and spark of painting a visual with sound is what I ended up doing without real understanding of how to do it or what I was doing in that moment, and then when my now wife came into the room, she said, "Wait! That's not coming from the TV? You're doing that?" That's when I got the idea that something was going on here that I was not aware of; I was channeling some inspiration there that I wasn't aware I had the ability to do. I think we will always try to channel that raw instinctive impulse, and our technique allows us to shape it into a form that makes sense but without that spark. I don't think the technique can ever make up for that. I think that it's just the shaping of the initial idea. - </p> <p>(<b><i>The Interpreters</i></b> first airs on PBS this Veteran's Day at 10 PM EST.) Check out the trailer here: <a href="https://www.pbs.org/video/trailer-interpreters-p9m4yo" target="_blank">PBS</a></p> <p><i>Miss Huang</i><i> is a st</i><i>udent</i><i> of </i><i>Macaulay's Honors College at CCNY and an online writer. </i><em>This is her first article for <a href="http://culturecatch.com/">CultureCatch.com</a>.</em></p> </div> <section> <a id="comment-1436"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1574113985"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/1436#comment-1436" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">It&#039;s incredible to see a…</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It's incredible to see a professional musician's creative process incorporate something as commonplace as TV! It makes me think of what other activities in my daily routine I can use as a source of inspiration in my writing. I look forward to your future articles, Ms. Huang!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1436&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kPJJiGnjmkVl2h64uf1fQGkCaqqtaLqSul_S3FhzpnQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kelvin S.</span> on November 14, 2019 - 22:27</p> </footer> </article> <a id="comment-1462"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1574351365"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/1462#comment-1462" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">This was an excellent…</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This was an excellent article on a very sad central issue. The ability for a composer like Mr. TaufiQue to convey to the viewer the genuine fear, tension, anxiety, and stress felt by these Interpreters as their new reality of being ostracized by their own neighbors and community members dawned on them is pivotal to the show's mission of bringing the world's lens on their plight.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1462&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="JxAjvakVVUQbWURUyKW5am8Ai0dLkGWI1ya0FQ2djUU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">S. N.</span> on November 20, 2019 - 20:04</p> </footer> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3894&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="AtZyDkFH6F-i_JELtT05npQndk2J27_cq-poA7eNjOU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 21:55:36 +0000 Isabella Huang 3894 at http://culturecatch.com How Charlie Parker Taught Me to Fly http://culturecatch.com/node/3893 <span>How Charlie Parker Taught Me to Fly </span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/6775" lang="" about="/user/6775" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Brian Boston</a></span> <span>November 11, 2019 - 10:51</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/73" hreflang="en">jazz</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UTORd2Y_X6U?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>It was just another Thursday on campus when my professor put on one of the Bird's popular recordings of "All the Things You Are" as an example of his work. Sitting in darkness in the back row, I found my mind racing as I was suddenly fourteen years old again, trying to make sense of that very same recording and why such a seemingly plain song was so important to jazz.</p> <p>“All the Things You Are” is often the first standard that budding jazz musicians will learn as it encompasses some of the most common chord changes -- 2-5's, chords moving in fourths diatonically, the chromatic walkdown at the end of the form, and that unmistakable intro/outro made famous by Bird himself. However, when lectured on the significance of this just a few years ago, I was left frustrated and confused with all questions and no answers.</p> <p>Coming into high school, I was a drummer -- nothing more. Three music classes a day, five days a week, and I still couldn't tell you what made up a scale or name a note on the staff. Each day brought humiliation. Ready to throw in the towel and daydreaming about transferring schools, those walks to the band room filled me with dread. While my peers worried themselves over Chemistry and History, Jazz had become the bane of my existence.</p> <p>As a teenager, Bird allegedly had a cymbal flung at him on the bandstand. If a sixteen year-old Parker could persevere, why couldn't I? Mama didn't raise no quitter after all. I relocated my lunch period to the practice rooms, and after school I spent hours hulked over the Vibraphone, fumbling over scales and arpeggios. Days turned to weeks, weeks to months, and soon I had upgraded from two mallets to four mallets, working on chord voicings and comping patterns.</p> <p>A summer of regimented practicing came and went, and I began sophomore year confident in my abilities. "All the Things You Are" showed me that I couldn't be any more wrong. I had all my scales down, minor, major, dominant, bebop, diminished, whole step, you name it. I was successful in teaching myself not only treble but bass clef in the span of a year. I could read down a lead sheet and comp the chords no problem. What I could not do, however, was improvise.</p> <p>The sole basis of <i>all jazz music </i>is improvisation. The art of instantaneous composition, of creating <b>your</b> own ideas and phrases over chord changes to tell <b>your</b> story -- that’s what makes the music. It’s what the greats from Monk to Miles were all renowned for. They say that the page is just a road map, a loosely interpretable guide to the music. Even still, staring at the first four chords (Fm7, Bbm7, Eb7, Abmaj7) I had no idea what to do with them, no understanding of what they had to do with each other. I was a dog, and my owner put the leash in my mouth and left me to walk myself.</p> <p>A new door had opened before me, a door to a previously unexplored world. Countless lessons and innumerable hours of practice later, I played my first solo at a concert (over Mingus' "Love Chant," in case you were curious). In time I was piecing together the puzzle, understanding the functions of each chord and what I could do to best serve them in my own playing. Armed with a new kind of confidence, it was hard to believe that music had seemed so grim and daunting just a few months prior. My playing evolved past any and all prior expectations I had reserved, and I began to experiment, pushing past my preconceived limits.</p> <p>The year I learned how to blow over "All the Things You Are" was the same year that I first composed music of my own. The same year that I took up playing the bass to sub in for a musical. The same year that I transcribed my first solo, Miles Davis' two choruses on "So What." The same year that I led a section for the first time, taking control of the drumline to arrange parts for the marching band’s repertoire. Although I began playing as a child, the flower of my musical career found the nutrients to blossom in high school.</p> <p>During those four years in high school, I had the privilege of meeting many great musical minds, orchestrating and performing my own written works, and learning four more instruments than I came in knowing. If I were lucky, I got to go home right after classes three or four days a month as I spent most of my time practicing in rehearsals or solo after school. I’ve played venues from the likes of Carnegie Hall to the streets of Little Italy and Chinatown. All of the things I am today, all thanks to Bird's "All the Things You Are." </p> <p><i>Mr. Boston is a Staten Island native studying Environmental Science at the Macaulay's Honors College at CCNY. </i><em>This is his first article for CultureCatch.com.</em></p> </div> <section> <a id="comment-1428"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1573513773"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/1428#comment-1428" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Beautifully written piece ,…</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Beautifully written piece , awesome article !</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1428&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="RnxoY28Yw_xKGP6zXvXQWVUYqZ2fCPrAEyO6tQQTfbk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Chris </span> on November 11, 2019 - 17:11</p> </footer> </article> <a id="comment-1461"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1574351386"></mark> <div> <h3><a href="/comment/1461#comment-1461" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Great article. All hail Bird.</a></h3> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Great article. All hail Bird.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=1461&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="PAalZC73loNZN0r0I5LqdbIMjJafIeKCGBvTFTl1xL8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> <footer> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/user/0"> <div class="field field--name-user-picture field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <a href="/user/0"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/extra_small/public/default_images/avatar.png?itok=RF-fAyOX" width="50" height="50" alt="Generic Profile Avatar Image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </a> </div> </article> <p>Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ben Lauter</span> on November 20, 2019 - 18:59</p> </footer> </article> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3893&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="AG08D3q5hfbTBFV5oVz2yW1CdfI9RaHpkee0aELoaO0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 11 Nov 2019 15:51:41 +0000 Brian Boston 3893 at http://culturecatch.com Song of the Week: "Sunday Never Comes" http://culturecatch.com/node/3892 <span>Song of the Week: &quot;Sunday Never Comes&quot;</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>November 3, 2019 - 18:42</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/music" hreflang="en">Music Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/636" hreflang="en">indie rock</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LIMpGGDMAmo?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Robyn Hitchcock has always been a smart art/indie rocker -- clever lyrics, hook-filled arrangements, concise songs. His latest -- "Sunday Never Comes" -- is a tasteful mid-tempo ballad that confronts a middle-aged artist longing for his lover. As Robyn claims, "the theme is distance, separation, and resolution." It was written for the 2018 film <em>Juliet Naked</em>. Gorgeous arpeggiated guitars and Robyn's laidback delivery pull you in right from the top. The songs reminds me of his 1991 classic "She Doesn't Exist." Well played, Mr. Hitchock. </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3892&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="HxgHCGxJT4dGlxXaEYgfKF6-3DY7gj5DB-Erprs1sz4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 03 Nov 2019 23:42:35 +0000 Dusty Wright 3892 at http://culturecatch.com