Music Review

Video of the Week: Melanie De Biasio - "No Reply"

Some artists transcend description, best they are not compartmentalized into a specific genre of music. Miss Melanie De Biasio is a Belgian artist that incorporates jazz, classical, nufolk, even electronica into her musically rich vocabulary to create her truly unique and atmospheric sound; not unlike Sigur Ros or Bjork or Joni Mitchell's jazz-informed work in the late '80s. This song was released on her 2014 album No Reply, an album I just got turned on to by my dear friend Michael Naso. This version of the song features strings and was recorded in a cathedral in Brussels. The arrangement is fantastic and it features a wonderful Gregorian contralto co-vocal by Romain Dayez. In fact, as much as I like this string-driven version of the title track, her song "The Flow" from that album is even better. It's got a killer groove. Think '70s era Gil Scott-Heron. And if that wasn't enough to take in, her new effort Lilies drops on October 6th. Check out her new single "Gold Junkies" -- one of the tracks from that album -- here. Take a deep breath and enjoy her wonderful music. I suspect the rest of America will be catching up with this extremely talented artist very soon. peace, Dusty

The Girl With A Thorn In Her Side

Lynn Castle Rose Colored Corner Light (Light In The Attic)

Coming across visually as a prototype Nancy Sinatra about to enter The Valley Of The Dolls, Lynn Castle in the 1960s was an entrancing and beguiling entity. Her debut album finally appears a few years shy of her turning eighty, and it is a tremendous affair, an index of splendid and unrealized possibilities, as stark as it is haunting.  Read more »

Tender & The Fury

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
Beacon Theatre, NYC
June 15, 2017

Much is being written that Nick Cave's current tour of Skeleton Tree may be his best yet. Seeing Mr. Cave and The Bad Seeds' performance last night at the Beacon Theatre in New York City, I would agree. Playing every song from that album except "Rings of Saturn" plus another eleven classic songs (set list here) from his catalog, it was a show that will be difficult to rival by any touring act this year or quite possibly until Mr. Cave decides to tour again. Quite remarkable given that he's a few months shy of his 60th year on Earth. Read more »

Something Strange Going On...

Long Strange Trip (Amazon Video)

I was stoked have scored a ticket for the limited-run (one week) theatrical screening of the new Grateful Dead documentary at IFC Cinema in the West Village. A four-hour love fest for Deadheads young and old, and more importantly for those music fans and the curious who just never got "it" and what it means to be a Deadhead. Expertly handled by director Amir Bar-Lev, there is so much to mine here that I can't imagine how much was left on the cutting room floor. (Props to executive producer Martin Scorsese, too.) Jerry's Frankenstein story frames the movie in a way that initially seems odd but by the end of the film makes perfect sense. After all, like the Monster, the band was "assembled" by the various parts (members, friends, fans, staff) that comprised it. Messy, joyous entropy in action; seemingly random, but actually spiritually connected on a very profound and metaphysically level. This could have easily been a 6 - 8 hour mini-series. Heck, I could have watched another hour just on the various keyboard players that brought their craft to the Dead. Or how the band would curate their set lists from show to show, never repeating a set list while on tour. But these are minor quibbles. This is a must-see film. Read more »

All Tomorrow's Karaokes

John Cale
Liverpool Sound City, UK
Friday 26th May 2017

Fifty years on and it is time to remember one of the most innovative albums ever impressed onto wax. A delicious dark and jagged confection of nihilism and sulky sophistication unlike it's Liverpudlian counterpart Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, also now fifty, but which was sunny, funny and a bit vaudeville. Both represent a pair of wildly different bookends. The Velvet Underground and Nico was then a monumental, commercial flop, whilst the Beatles album sold in the millions. With half a century under its belt of shiny studded leather, the Velvets album now has an arc of influence that continues to reach into the hearts of those who wish to create a positive noise. Read more »

Nobody Left To Run With Anymore... RIP, Gregg Allman

The annual pilgrimage to the Beacon Theatre became a winter event that my friends and I relished each and every March, something to brighten up the dull blues of winter. The Allman Brothers Band were more than just a "jam" band. And while they defined the Southern Rock ethos and kick-started the whole jam band movement, they were more than that. Yes, they were improvisational monsters, but they also wrote and played highly melodic music, music that stands the test of time; and they owned the covers they performed as well. Only The Grateful Dead could rival them as a live act with staying power, albeit cast in a different Americana psychedlic haze. Read more »

Vinyl of the Week: Marty Stuart - Way Out West

I've always been a fan of the Mississippi-born Marty Stuart. The dude can play just about any style of Americana and his latest effort -- Way Out West -- expands his musical universe to include some real tasty surf 'n' twang. Produced by Tom Petty and The Heartbreaker's guitarist Mike Campbell, you know the amps are going to be cranked, but crisp, the playing tight, but not too tight, and the tunes catchy as hell -- not a clunker in the lot. Happy to report you can check all those boxes. Add Marty's "fabulous" backing band, His Fabulous Superlatives, who are just that, and you have the recipe for some real fine ear candy. And let's give props to guitarist Kenny Vaughn who has always been one of Nashville's guitarists guitarists, and as usual he gets to shine. On the surfabilly instrumental "Torpedo" you can frug to the two guitars, bass and drums attack. It's like Duane Eddy meets The Ventures. Watch out for that giant wave, ya landlubbers! And the trippy cinematic "Way Out West" song is pure Wall of Voodoo meets Angelo Badalamenti. Hey, Mr. Music Supervisor, this song is perfect for David Lynch's Twin Peaks reboot. Come to think of it, all of the tracks are worthy. Marty and the lads will be touring this fall with Chris Stapelton and their own shows right now -- click here for dates. In the meantime, pick up a vinyl copy. Your turntable will be stoked that you did. peace, Dusty

Single of the Week: Scout Durwood - "Take One Thing Off"

If you dig Peaches, then you'll love "Take One Thing Off" and the above video. I wasn't familiar with comedian Scout Durwood's work, but she's clearly got chops, can sing, and can take the piss -- as they say in ol' Blighty. Millienials know her from the Snoop Dogg produced Mary + Jane MTV comedy series about two Hollywood gals whacky weed biz, as well as her well-documented standup comedy schtick. So she's got a new album of comedy and music breaking on May 19th on Blue Élan Records. Had I produced this single, I might have added Fred Schneider of The B-52s in a campy cameo vocal and video appeareance. Regardless, this is one seriously infectious tune. Crank it, then "dance this mess around." peace, Dusty

A Mexican Affair

A Mexican Affair
Created and performed by Rafa Reyes
Produced and directed by Jeremy Williams
The Metropolitan Room, NYC
Saturday, April 8, 2017

What keeps A Mexican Affair -- cabaret show headlined by Rafa Reyes and backed by a fine Latin group -- going? It is the immense personable charm and contagious self-delight of Rafa himself, coupled with the powerful support he receives from the quintet behind him. This young singer from Mexico, who came to the United States to attend New York’s American Musical and Dramatic Academy, certainly has “that something” and it bespeaks of the kind of presence that compels an audience to stay with him and see what will unfold. That’s no mean feat in the world of solo cabaret performing (or in solo performing of any kind). The seasoned New York cabaret audience knows immediately if the performer in front of them is up to something, something that deserves more than casual attention and polite applause. A Mexican Affair delivers. Read more »

Free From Conformity

On the occasion of their new mega-release on Leo Records, The Art of Perelman-Shipp Vols. 1-7 and their ensuing CD release party at Le Poisson Rouge on May 7th at 9:30 P.M. with Italian Surf Academy, I asked Ivo Perelman and Matthew Shipp the following questions.

Steve Dalanchinsky: How long have you been associated both as collaborators and friends? Read more »

Blues for Gérard (mon frère Gérard)

I first met Gérard in 2001. Alexander Pierrepont brought my wife Yuko and me to his radio show to be interviewed sometime in the middle of summer in the middle of the night. We immediately hit it off, both of us loving jazz and justice just equally. I always made him laugh… we always understood each other despite my non-existent French and his almost non-existent English. We would see each other every time I went to Paris, and I'd always go to a concert he'd booked at Sunside/Sunset or La Java. He was very generous to me and would always give me CDs from his incredible label. I had already had some LPs on Marge/Futura but knew nothing about the man behind the label; as I said, we became fast friends. Sometime in autumn around 2013 Gerard offered me a gig at La Java. He said there would be little if any money but that I could have all the drinks I wanted and that I could bring merchandise to sell and any musicians I wanted. He had only one request. Since I was opening for French band that played Chicago blues, he asked if I had any blues poems and if not could I write/read at least one to help please the audience. I’m laughing. "But Gerard, mon frère, of course I'll write you a blues poem." And I did. The musicians were Sabir Mateen, Sylvain Kassab and Cathy Hayden -- three avant-garde reed players. Read more »

Vinyl of the Week: Curse of Lono - Severed

I've been a wit bit tardy on my vinyl reviews as of late, being so busy with my own music project, but this album Severed (Submarine Cat Records) is so worthwhile even with the wait. Curse of Lono (no, not the Hunter S. Thompson novel) have crafted some very compelling gothic Americana on their debut full-length slab o' vinyl. Hailing from the UK they have taken up where leader Felix Bechtolsheimer formerly of Hey Negrita left off. The video above for the song "Pick Up The Pieces" is just the tip of the iceberg, as they say. A tom-tom primal Bo Diddy groove monster of a song it is, but just one of ten nuggets, five on each side, 38 minutes tight. This is the way music was meant to be heard. Get up and flip the disc over. Repeat. The Curse of Lono has descended upon my turntable and infected my whole home. Welcome to the my nightmare. Where's Hunter when you need him cuz I need my home exorcised. x, Dusty

Song of the Week: Talay - "Parents' House"

Sometimes you have to give musicians the benefit of the doubt. As a follow musician, I often wonder if I've been given the same courtesy when I've asked a friend to come to one of my gigs or listen to one of my albums. Friendships can cloud judgements, or not. Other musicians can way too critical of fellow musicians, or not. So the other day I was in 30th Street Guitars, one of my favorite guitar shops (repairs, new and used gear) in the world looking to test-drive a new reverb pedal (Moog MF Analog Trem). I was ushered into their sound-proof room by my friend Jimmy Archey and introduced to fellow musician Talay who was playing her guitar through a new amp. Jimmy asked the young rocker to demo my pedal while I dialed in the various settings. As is often the case with fellow musicians we started to chat about our music and gear. A few mintues later, she invited me to her gig later that evening which I could not make as I had a prior commitment. But she did tell me that she had just released a new single called "Parents' House."

She left and I didn't give it much thought until I pulled out her card this AM and decided that I should check out her latest tune given that I liked her energy and attitude. I very much wanted to see how her music measured up to her personality. Well, I was blown away. Melodic, punchy, poppy and memorable rock 'n' roll, all ingredients that scream "keeper" in my ever-expanding world of music accumulation. If you dig Weezer, Fountains of Wayne and Semisonic, you will def need it. But Talay's music is deserving of a much wider audience and if your smart you'll download it today. You owe it to yourself, your playlist and Talay. - Dusty Wright

LeAnn Rimes In Concert

LeAnn Rimes
Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts, NY
March 17, 2017

LeAnn Rimes performed last Friday night at the Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts, a beautifully (and recently) renovated former movie palace and Broadway style theater. At 1100 seats it is a warm an intimate venue. Read more »

Roll Over, Chuck Berry! RIP...

When I was seven-years old I had a Kool-Aid stand and with my profits bought my very first album -- The Beatles' Second Album. I remember walking the several blocks to the Acme store and praying that they still had a copy in the album rack. They did. I couldn't wait to get home and play it on my portable record player. I carefully placed the needle on the very first track on side one of that magnificent album and... my life would forever be devoted to music in some shape or form. On that beloved album, the very first track was my favorite song -- "Roll Over Beethoven" -- by one Mr. Chuck Berry. At the time, I had no idea who wrote the song nor much cared. It was all about The Beatles. But as almost everyone knows, Chuck Berry wrote and recorded it years earlier. And it would take me several years and thousands of hours of listening to rock music later to understand how important Chuck Berry was to the genre. In fact, I would better understand his place in music history from the likes of The Rolling Stones and The Grateful Dead. And it would be decades later until I actually would meet him in person. But what a meeting. Read more »

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