Art Review http://culturecatch.com/art en Knoxville Art Time http://culturecatch.com/node/3715 <span>Knoxville Art Time</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/349" lang="" about="/user/349" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dom Lombardi</a></span> <span>December 10, 2018 - 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="839" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-12/joseph-delaney-vj-day.jpg?itok=Fqe_dEQo" title="joseph-delaney-vj-day.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Joseph Delaney, VJ Day (Courtesy of the Ewing Gallery)</figcaption></figure><p>As someone who has kept a sharp eye on the New York City art scene since the early 1970s, I must admit that some of my most <a href="https://www.huffingtonpost.com/d-dominick-lombardi/nashville-arts_b_1924180.html" target="_blank">memorable experiences</a> have occurred in Tennessee. In 2012, it was the Tennessee State Museum where I saw and reviewed an exhibition of the politically charged, multi-media works of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/30900-skeletons-in-our-shared-closet" target="_blank">John Mellencamp</a>. Later that same year it was the powerful and moving retrospective of the photography and videos of Carrie Mae Weems at The Frist Center for the Visual Arts, both in Nashville.</p> <p>This time around I find myself in Knoxville, as I visit three different institutions featuring four very diverse selections of art and ideas. <a href="https://ewing-gallery.utk.edu/" target="_blank">Ewing Gallery of Art</a>, which can be found on the campus of the University of Tennessee, features <b><i>Blurring Boundaries: The Women of AAA from 1936 – Present</i></b>. The exhibition is comprised of art by 54 female members of American Abstract Artists. An institution begun in New York in 1936, at a time when the pioneers of abstract art, and to a much greater extent, their female counterparts were having a near impossible time finding a gallery to exhibit their work.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="932" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-12/esphyr-slobodkina-the-red-l-abstraction.jpg?itok=zV9nBveN" title="esphyr-slobodkina-the-red-l-abstraction.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Esphyr Slobodkina, The Red L Abstraction (1940), gouache on paperboard, 8 x 9 inches</figcaption></figure><p><i>Blurring Boundaries: The Women of AAA from 1936 -- Present</i> begins with few formidable examples of the earliest work from AAA’s archives. Initially, I am drawn to the painting <i>The Red L Abstraction</i> (1940) by Esphyr Slobodkina, an intimately sized spatial narrative that traverses an advancing perspective with active shapes and a sophisticated color scheme. You can just see the artist’s mind working here, wrangling with representation and abstraction in the pursuit of a purer, more universal and timeless aesthetic. Alice Trumbull Mason’s <i>Magnitude of Memory</i> (1962) has a similar feel with far less representation and increased rhythmic transitions that are suggestive of the kind of visual variances one sees on screen at the end of an old color film projection as it breaks free of its reel and quickly blurs into wiggling bands of color.</p> <p>From here, the early work quickly moves to the diversity and the vitality of the current day and how well every piece here, despite the various media and messages, all fit together exceedingly well. Susan Smith's <i>2 ½ lb Irregular Grid</i> (2012) is a reactive, jazzy jaunt of red lines as she riffs off of a flattened out, crisscrossed fast food container in surprisingly systematic and seamlessly expanding tangents. The wall label lists the media as collage, but I definitely see ball point pen lines and a slightly different color red in the areas surrounding the more obviously printed pattern on the crushed container; both indicating elements of added drawing. The painting <i>Laughter and Forgetting</i> (2017) by Cecily Kahn reveals an odd sort of control somewhere between the chaotic and the meditative. It almost seems as if when making this painting, the artist was moving back and forth mentally between a waking dream and focused frenzy.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1194" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-12/susan-smith-irregular-grid.jpg?itok=duJMQ2ut" title="susan-smith-irregular-grid.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Susan Smith, 2 ½ lb. Irregular Grid (2012), collage, 9 x 9 ½ inches</figcaption></figure><p>Susan Smith, <i>2 ½ lb.</i> <i>Irregular Grid</i> (2012),  collage, 9 x 9 ½ inches   </p> <p><i>Blurring Boundaries: The Women Of AAA, 1936–present</i>, which is curated by Rebecca DiGiovanna,<i> </i>runs through December 10, 2018.</p> <p class="text-align-center">----------------------------</p> <p>The second exhibition is titled <b><i>Mutual Muses</i></b>. Here visitors will experience the work and vision of two late-career artists who inspired and complimented each other's productivity virtually their entire adult lives. Individually, they both are leaders in their chosen fields. Both are living examples of the transition between Modern and Contemporary Art. <a href="http://mimigarrarddance.com/" target="_blank">Mimi Garrard</a> today, is an award-winning creator of videos that feature her beautiful and elegantly choreographed dance performances. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Seawright" target="_blank">James Seawright</a>, her partner, who currently has his ground-breaking, multi-media light based work <i>Searcher</i> (1966) at the Whitney Museum of Art’s exhibition <i>Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965-2018</i>.</p> <p>For this exhibition, the artists have created a number of collaborative prints that reflect a variety of sources including video stills that fracture and re-form into largely geometric or symmetrical shapes. Comprised mostly of curious marks that almost jump off the surface of the paper, each image represents a cross between organic and mechanical mapping. When looking at prints like <i>Untitled (KY5)</i> (2018) I keep picturing an army of artist/ants controlled by M. C. Escher in the rigorous pursuit of symbolizing a perfect balance between mind and body resulting in incredibly intricate patterns.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1200" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-12/seawright-garrard-untitled.jpg?itok=kXVmP5ZR" title="seawright-garrard-untitled.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>James Seawright and Mimi Garrard, Untitled (KY5) (2018), archival digital print, 20 x 20 inches</figcaption></figure><p>In addition to the optically opulent prints are intriguing examples of Seawright's more intimately scaled kinetic and light based art and Garrard's multi-layered videos of her stunningly choreographed dance performances.</p> <p><i>Mutual Muses</i>, an exhibition curated by T. Michael Martin, ends February 20, 2019.</p> <p class="text-align-center">----------------------------</p> <p>At the UT Downtown gallery is an excellent show of portraits by Joseph Delaney (1904-1991) titled <b><i>Face to Face</i></b>. Most of the work here ranges in dates from the 1950s to 1970s when the Knoxville-born Delaney lived in New York City. The portraits featured throughout the gallery come from the time he spent at his beloved Arts Students League or participating in many of the Washington Square Outdoor Art Exhibits. I am told the subjects that are forward facing were made during his idle time at the Washington Square exhibitions, while the three-quarter and near profile views are most likely of the models at the League.</p> <p>Delany an accomplished artist who painted numerous city scenes like his wonderful renditions of parades and nightlife despised abstract art. I sense, hearing stories about him, that he felt there is more than enough one can do with representation to expand the critical course of art making, therefore abstraction was an unnecessary endeavor, even an abomination in his eyes.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="835" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-12/various-details-joseph-delaney.jpg?itok=SAnnkUns" title="various-details-joseph-delaney.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Joseph Delaney, Various Details</figcaption></figure><p>Being an artist myself, I know how my skills and level of concentration can vary from day to day and in these mid nineteenth century portraits by Delaney in a wide spectrum of styles and materials, anyone can see how the media and the mood of the moment can yield such different approaches and results. There is something iconic about the images rendered in charcoal; the overwhelming honesty in the graphite drawings, his distinct flair in the lines he produced with ink and brush; that wispy weariness in his watercolors and that odd sort of awkwardness in his pastels that all the results, somehow, reveal the substance of his subjects and the seductiveness of their souls.</p> <p>Curated by Sam Yates, <i>Face to Face</i> ends December 8, 2018.</p> <p class="text-align-center">----------------------------</p> <p>The University of Tennessee's graduate student gallery, <a href="https://downtown.utk.edu/" target="_blank">Gallery 1010</a>, maintains a very vigorous schedule with quickly changing exhibitions. This time around it is Dana Potter's <b><i>No Good, Know How</i></b>, an interactive, mixed media installation that challenges the senses while recording your responses. The basic set-up here is quite impressive as all the elements and states of her art-making process are present for everyone to see. From the computer cutouts that graphically represent artist’s equipment and every-day tools to the multi-layered prints they eventually make, Potter reveals a keen vision layered in mysterious methodology that slowly deepens with most onlooker's involvement.</p> <p> </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1572" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-12/dana-potter-computer-work-station.jpg?itok=Mi6jo-bq" title="dana-potter-computer-work-station.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Dana Potter, Computer Work Station, Installation View, No Good, Know How, various sizes</figcaption></figure><p>At the core of the installation is the mapping of eye movements via computer relative to the instructions devised by the artist, a process that results in limitless possibilities as printouts. The way I end up dealing with the stresses of the challenge -- the self-imposed anxiety of playing a game on an interactive computer screen is a very effective and somewhat disorienting or reorienting experience for me. Additionally, Potter's prints create a new sort of edginess to the concept of aesthetic beauty -- and one that I can easily live with. I very much look forward to seeing what comes next in the promising career of Dana Potter.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3715&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="rP8aQr-HRkLjQXbRfw2loZLLhceewKbUNOjeO_k_iH8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 10 Dec 2018 15:00:00 +0000 Dom Lombardi 3715 at http://culturecatch.com Cubed By Eozen http://culturecatch.com/node/3799 <span>Cubed By Eozen</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/maryhrbacek" lang="" about="/users/maryhrbacek" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Hrbacek</a></span> <span>December 6, 2018 - 12:22</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/639" hreflang="en">cubism</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/204" hreflang="en">abstract expressionism</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-12/eozen-agopian-presently.jpg?itok=yJ7TmWoW" width="1200" height="1504" alt="Thumbnail" title="eozen-agopian-presently.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Eozen Agopian: <em>The Fabric of Space</em></p> <p>Greek Consulate, New York</p> <p>November 15 – 30, 2018</p> <p><em>The Fabric of Space</em>, curated by Thalia Vrachopoulos, conveys an unusual vision by Eozen Agopian that borrows from Cubist art without in any way replicating its intensions. At first glance the similar-sized shapes in Agopian's works spark the link that soon dissolves as the intricacies of her elaborate overlapping configurations of colored fabric and skeins of thread invade one’s senses. The intelligence of these spaces and movements quickly takes precedence over the superficial initial impressions of the moment. In a city where abstract art reigns, and holdovers of gestural abstraction from the heyday of Abstract Expressionism remain intact for decades, it is a pleasure and a relief to discover an artist whose convictions are backed by the strength of her individuality.</p> <p>Elaborate networks of interlocking and overlapping thread charm and captivate the eye with fleeting recollections of electrical lines or even intertwined networks of roots, maps of roads or the webs of spiders. The artist forges universal comparisons that give full play to viewer imagination and participation in the interpretation of her visually expansive orchestrated cloth ensembles. Because the works are not connected with conceptual art they are free of a planned or prescribed narrative. One may meander visually through the forest of shapes that differ in color, to contemplate their meanings. The square shape is said to symbolize matter, the earth, and stability. In Islam it denotes the heart of a normal human being open to four paths of influence, which include the human, the divine, the angelic, and the diabolic. ("1000 Symbols," p. 335, Rowena + Rupert Shepherd, Thames + Hudson.) The square forms mirror the complexities one might discover within a maquette of the human mind with its quick, shimmering apprehensions of data that are continually entering its portals</p> <p>Agopian succeeds in bringing the canvas beneath the cloth labyrinths to the surface of the works via the cream and off-white colored heaps of vertically and diagonally fixed multiple mounds and hills of directed threads. Thread suggests diverse implications, from narrative literary fables to mythic fates that measure and cut the threads of an individual human life. Threads establish boundaries of alignment in the mazes of the mind. They are indiscernible transmitters of sound, light, memory and emotion. Looped and tied threads conjure intertwining associations and dependencies. Inter-winding knots appear to have no beginnings or ends, implying the process of evolution and the power of destiny. Knots combine as well as entangle. Themes of entrapment arise in the surface of the works, which do not read as morose; rather they present moderated emotions with egalitarian feeling states. Knotting and unknotting reflect the psychic method of analysis and synthesis of the threads of the individual personality. (<em>The Book of Symbol</em>s, p. 518, Taschen.)</p> <p>Fabric is often compared in literature to the "stuff" of life.  Life is created through threads of experience as fabric is created through the weaving of cloth. In this sense, these works are universal metaphors for life; they resound with the richness and vibrancy of sight and touch that our senses respond most to. The artist’s small works grouped in series are especially compelling as they relate intricately with each other, as if carrying on complex conversations. There is a sense of urgent energy that flickers palpably among them.</p> <p>Nets are typically symbolic of binding, capture and entanglements. In certain types of Buddhism, earthly existence is regarded as a net that entraps the human spirit. The net is also regarded as a marshalling force that transforms irreconcilable energies. Networks reference connectedness whether it applies to business, personal, social, or to communication in the World Wide Web. (<em>The Book of Symbols</em>, p. 518, Taschen.)</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-12/eozen-agopian-nicholas-space-.jpg?itok=1jc0gmum" width="1200" height="1326" alt="Thumbnail" title="eozen-agopian-nicholas-space-.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>In myth and legends, the patience represented by the stitching process leads to redemption; it mends the torn fabric of the psyche and repairs the beguiled circumstances. Sewing links us to the notion of the weaving of life and the strands of fate. (<em>The Book of Symbols</em>, p. 460, Taschen.)</p> <p>Cloth is perhaps associated historically with women who have created such things as garments, lacework, quilts, bedding, embroidery; the list goes on. But Agopian makes no move to produce careful stitchery or utilitarian or even "fine" handiwork or objects. She is a quirky artist who is having her own say in a language of her ingenious invention, much as Judy Chicago has done in 1974 - 79 in her "Dinner Party" piece. Agopian does not confine her materials to thread and cloth; she also applies paint to her works to provide a rich array of multiple medias whose interplay connects her pieces to the ebullient art of painting. The richness of the paint on the strands of the canvas provides a textural contrast, which augments the artistic revelations and historic comparisons that it stimulates. Agopian's art is tactile and visual; it appeals directly to our senses in an effective fusion of forms that reinforce the abiding power of its intelligent underpinnings.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3799&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="jO_J9suU1bmacoNWgrz4vcxU0HINfSPb3f9Vp4BA08w"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 06 Dec 2018 17:22:25 +0000 Mary Hrbacek 3799 at http://culturecatch.com First Contact http://culturecatch.com/node/3794 <span>First Contact</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/millree-hughes" lang="" about="/users/millree-hughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Millree Hughes</a></span> <span>November 16, 2018 - 10:08</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/510" hreflang="en">painters</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/115" hreflang="en">gallery show</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1160" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-11/rose-gold.jpeg?itok=ZKMM7Khr" title="rose-gold.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1150" /></article><figcaption>Rose/Gold, oil on canvas, 2015</figcaption></figure><p><a href="http://www.jocelynhobbie.com" target="_blank">Jocelyn Hobbie</a>'s new paintings are hanging at <a href="http://www.fredericksfreisergallery.com" target="_blank">Fredericks and Freiser Gallery</a> at 536 West 24th Street in New York, open every day, apart from Sunday and Monday, from 10am until 6pm. She appears to be harking back to an earlier time when the artist's job was to praise youth and beauty and the skill of the other craftspeople of the day. Like Franz Winterhalter who painted the court of Queen Victoria and exalted Charles Worth the father of haute couture. The dressmaker, the fabric designer, the dyer, the hair cutter. And the painters themselves, who can cause a frisson by rendering a little application of lipstick on the lips of a lovely, just formed woman. </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1278" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-11/fairisle-and-geraniums.jpeg?itok=gpLL00Ki" title="fairisle-and-geraniums.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Fair Isle and Geraniums, oil on canvas, 2018</figcaption></figure><p>In "Fair Isle and Geraniums" the geraniums are understood in a highly plastic way. They remind me of the flowers of the '70s rock album illustrator, Alan Aldridge, who amped up Nature in his book <em>The Butterfly Ball</em> so that dimensionality and depth of pigment trumped light and shadow. In a Jocelyn Hobbie painting everything is made out of a material that you would never mistake for a photograph. On a surface that is very far from a backlit phone. This is not a reproduction. The medium is the message.</p> <p> Warhol created "The Manufactured Painting" where the individual subsumes themselves so that the work can be about  mechanical reproduction. The idea is that "the studio" becomes a fantasy about "the factory."</p> <p>The influence of this concept has become so prevalent that the disappearance of touch has become desirable in some modern work. Jeff Koons has most famously employed his assistants to paint his paintings with the directive to not allow a brush mark to be seen. To act like photograph reproducers.</p> <p>Hobbie's pieces remind me of Kehinde Wiley's most famous paintings. Portraits where the skin is highly modeled and the clothes and backgrounds are more flat, referencing decorative surfaces. But Hobbie is hypersensitive to color where Wiley's choices can at times look approximate, as if they were chosen from a color chart. And his skin surfaces can look artificial where hers emanate light. It's inevitable when a portrait is made by a studio in China, full of workers, rather than by a single artist. But Wiley deliberately sacrifices touch for effect. He's making hip hop court paintings! The conceit that it is the work of a great studio is in keeping with its ambitions </p> <p>Hobbie is keeping it small, intimate. You are here in the gallery with "the thing." There's a dialogue, however unequal, between you and it. This is because there is the presence of another person in the room.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1045" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-11/ikat-bouquet.jpeg?itok=GFA1tW_o" title="ikat-bouquet.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Ikat Bouquet, Oil on canvas, 2018</figcaption></figure><p>"Ikat Bouquet" is backed up by a deeply plumbed aqua blue, as you can see. If this is a glorified fashion "shoot," the model is appropriately detached. The rendering of the face abandons anatomy for effect. The cheek bone shading goes on forever. Hobbie points out visual aspects without conceptualizing them. Painting is a phenomenological project.</p> <p>Perhaps what's been forgotten is that when a painting is not the hand of a single auteur something about the work dies.</p> <p>This is because the onlooker seeks contact with the maker. Without that there is no dialogue.</p> <blockquote> <p>"It's always based on the two poles, the onlooker and the maker, and the spark that comes from the bipolar action gives birth to something-like electricity." Marcel Duchamp</p> </blockquote> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3794&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="LkIZZLONlC3Ys2gW5qsv1Utfb_Vn7sLPN78xs8SW49Q"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 16 Nov 2018 15:08:41 +0000 Millree Hughes 3794 at http://culturecatch.com Reconstructing Memories http://culturecatch.com/node/3792 <span>Reconstructing Memories</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/349" lang="" about="/user/349" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dom Lombardi</a></span> <span>November 13, 2018 - 17:17</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/605" hreflang="en">art exhibit</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1397" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-11/buick-exposure.jpg?itok=2v7eeKLe" title="buick-exposure.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Buick Exposure, acrylic and gesso on bed sheet, 81 x 77 inches, 2018</figcaption></figure><p>Elise P. Church: <em>Say, sea</em></p> <p>happylucky no. 1 gallery, Brooklyn, NY</p> <p>I am always impressed by how a spirited art gallery exhibition can enliven the most dismal of days. Even with many of the nearby stores shuttered on one particular block of Nostrand Avenue, <i>Say, sea</i> at happylucky no. 1 gallery easily brightens my chilly and overcast Sunday afternoon.</p> <p><i>Say, sea,</i> is one-person exhibition comprised of recent works by Elise P. Church that reveal a most curious way of reconstructing the missing mementos of a past life. Having often moved back and forth between homes in coastal Massachusetts and Bermuda in her youth, Church lost or misplaced all of her early photographs and souvenirs. To replace them, Church continually scours the Internet to acquire similar photographs to the ones that have vanished. Overall, the images would have to be of or referencing the sea or seaside living, as all of her childhood homes were at or near the sea. In addition, to make them more relevant to her particular past, all would be dated from the 1960s and '70s to correspond to her era. Then there is the title of the exhibition, which comes from a poem by Emily Dickinson titled <i>Part Three: Love, XI</i>, with the last two lines reading: "Say, sea," "Take me!"</p> <p>It is sometimes good to know the background and intent of an artist or exhibition, but it is not integral to the success of this show. Walking through the exhibition and not knowing the background information, you can sense that this work is about a person dealing with loss, especially since many of the paintings and photographs are fragments or contain small to large portions of the composition cut away and removed. The painting techniques used by the artist, which come off looking like watercolors overall, are executed on fragments of fabric and sheets of paper giving the exhibition a feeling of weightlessness or buoyancy, which in turn suggests movement or transference.</p> <p>As stated in the exhibition essay, Church begins her work with an acquired photograph. In her large pieces, these become the aforementioned paintings that read so well as memories softened by time and hardened by loss. The small snapshots, on the other hand, are cut into, reduced and overlapped photographs that result in alluring little abstractions. Despite their size, the results are quite potent as each leaves us with just enough information to pique one's interest. With each of these intimate works, which have cryptic titles and recent dates, Church brings us to her experiences as a child, her feelings, her memories of sights, sounds and smells coupled with the texture of discovery, and the newness of things when a young mind is filling up with impressions and perceptions that spawn a lifetime of learning.</p> <p>happyluck no. 1 gallery is located at 734 Nostrand Avenue in Brooklyn. They are open Tuesday to Sunday from 1 to 7pm. <i>Say,sea,</i> runs through November 25<sup>th</sup>.   </p> <p> </p> <p>      </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3792&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="rhdttNnKN_C94xy6hiE_uqRT3y8oYHEFtVxmnmIZr7I"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 13 Nov 2018 22:17:53 +0000 Dom Lombardi 3792 at http://culturecatch.com Born Reborn In Mixed Mediums http://culturecatch.com/node/3789 <span>Born Reborn In Mixed Mediums</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/maryhrbacek" lang="" about="/users/maryhrbacek" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mary Hrbacek</a></span> <span>November 5, 2018 - 16:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/605" hreflang="en">art exhibit</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/280" hreflang="en">sculptor</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/618" hreflang="en">Safarani sisters</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="890" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-11/my-sisters-picture-ss.jpg?itok=hcAg5d4u" title="my-sisters-picture-ss.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>My Sister's Picture, Oil on canvas overlaid with video projection, 40 x 30 inches, 2018</figcaption></figure><p><em>The Safarani Sisters: Reincarnation</em></p> <p>Elga Wimmer PCC, NYC</p> <p>Roya Khadjavi Projects presents <em>The Safarani Sisters: Reincarnation</em>, a series of fourteen new video-paintings in which the identical-twin Iranian sisters <a href="https://www.safaranisisters.com/" target="_blank">Bahareh and Farzandeh Safarani</a> create a plausible world of visual intrigue.  The exhibit features the artists in a performance-based genre of photography, painting and video. Reincarnation refers to the rebirth of one's psyche into a new body, but here it is the twins' inner life that undergoes a process of transformation. The Safaranis incorporate the ambient play of shadow, light and reflection to stress interior versus exterior reality in their psychologically potent episodic narratives. The video projections create convincing atmospheric visual and kinesthetic effects. Windows play an important role as metaphoric unconscious portals that signify each twin's quest for self-revelation.</p> <p>The twins' purposeful methods to overcome their diffidence generate edgy disquiet images whose compelling video projections infuse the element of time to create believable phantom-like forms that appear and dissolve. Their barely perceptible movements generate a sense of legerdemain and reverie, which forges cinematic effects within the dynamics of the skillfully articulated paintings. This uneasy terrain leads to viewer speculations and mild disquiet at the unconventional yet wondrous ephemeral visual perceptions. The pictorial interiors are refreshed by elusive breezes that engender feelings of anticipation inculcated with repressed angst and suspense. Viewers inadvertently create unpredictable interactive results that intensify the visual complexities as projections cast exquisite shadows that meld their identities into the scenes.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/O2pta6rP1qM?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>Each format is an intense multiplex scene that progresses as the artists inscribe intricate emotions onto the canvases using both photography and video projections, to build deepened self-identities as women. Through this exposure or "unveiling" the sisters enhance their relationship as twins, and their sense of themselves as Iranian woman artists. The artists gradually defeat their trepidations by scrutinizing uncertainties in a visual discourse, which ultimately strengthens their consciousness and confidence.</p> <p>In passages that parallel Dutch Masters and Renaissance interiors the artists sit, stand or recline, seemingly absorbed in profound thought, contemplating quiet rooms imbued with light that emanates from prominent windows and empty mirrors. The video imagery forms apparitions glimpsed briefly at illuminated windows in bare rooms, as the women speculate on their inner and outer surroundings. The immobility of quiet figures suggests parallels with women in rigid societies where culturally imposed boundaries hinder them in their daily movements, their education and experiences, and limit the scope of their prospective achievements.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/84neDpGOV3k?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>The Safarani sisters engage in hidden internal strategies to realize progress as women and as human beings by cultivating their resolve to collaborate in their quest to conquer culturally imposed fears and hesitations. In many cultures, twins are assigned a sacred symbolic role; in Greek mythology, as progeny of Zeus the Dioscuri were instated as the Gemini constellation in the firmament for eternity. In ancient China, "twins" are affiliated at once with both discord and harmony (p. 69, <em>1000 Symbols</em>, Thames &amp; Hudson, 2002). The show demonstrates an impressive degree of creative cooperation.</p> <p>The video-painting entitled "5:30 a.m. In the Basement" (oil painting on canvas overlaid with video projections, 60 x 36 inches, 2018) reveals a sister engaged in wiping bright red blood off the floor, positioned near a door stained with a red handprint. This printed self-signifying cipher represents a universally recognized style of signature whose imprint has spiritual connotations as an evocation of divine power. In India, doors with handprints are thought to protect the family home. Hands epitomize Islam’s five reverent precepts:  prayer, faith, fasting, charity and pilgrimage (p. 159, <em>The Book of Symbols</em>, ARAS, Taschen, 2010). In various cultures blood frequently connotes suffering and sacrifice. It is related to childbirth and to life force, associated with rebirth. Here it may suggest the exigency to strive to relinquish living a life devoid of progress. The basement personifies a dark, moist womb-like underworld whose substructure we build on, in order to attain psychical, developmental or instinctual evolution, to hide or to keep our secrets or our valuables.</p> <p>In Islam the basement is a hidden place where mystics are said to withdraw in search of union with the Almighty. (P. 574, <em>The Book of Symbols</em>.)</p> <p>In other works, blue or white light is projected through shielded semi-transparent window frames to shape forms on the floors that glimmer within the restrained interiors. White light, which is associated with "spirit," exudes a sense of purity; it is linked to innocence, to virgins, to wedding dresses, and to enlightenment while blue light has profound metaphysical connotations. (P. 545, <em>The Book of Symbol</em>s, ARAS, Taschen, 2010.)</p> <p>The use of soft warm brown, green, gold and yellow contrasted with pale ultramarine blue augments the artists’ enigmatic passage of developing consciousness in a mood of expectancy, heightened by the subtle employment of video images of objects such as a cuckoo clock, drapery, and figural phantasms that appear and disintegrate in a believable invented scenario.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uIihoOE4ErA?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>In "Late Afternoon Gaze 1" (oil painting on canvas overlaid with video projection, 60 x 36 inches, 2018) a sister makes direct eye contact with the viewer against a drapery backdrop, as she confronts her need to establish a forbidden connection. In a sequential work, “Late Afternoon Gaze 2” (oil painting on canvas overlaid with video projection, 50 x 36 inches, 2018), with her face in shadow she retreats behind a sheer or "veil," denoting a regression from her previous self-assertive maneuver. In recent centuries the veil has carried political importance in societies where removing it becomes a gesture of independence in terms of cultural and religious identity. Veils are a traditional means to disguise, conceal and separate.  Spiritual revelation would be tantamount to "unveiling" or revealing the transpersonal reality beyond the realm of the sensate (p. 530, <em>The Book of Symbols</em>, ARAS, Taschen, 2010).</p> <p>The video-painting entitled "<a href="https://youtu.be/Q4E2HStUu7A" target="_blank">Awake</a>" (oil painting on canvas overlaid with video projection, 120 x 72 inches, 2018) arrays a sister clad in a dark dress, lying in an empty room on a floor filled with puddles of diffused reflections.  She covers her face in an apparent attempt to shrink from the inevitability of her metamorphosis. In the double format work entitled "<a href="https://youtu.be/cWS9du96RwI" target="_blank">Twilight Reincarnation</a>" (oil painting on canvas overlaid with video projection, 108 x 72 inches, 2018), the two sisters, one reclining and one hesitantly standing, seem suspended as they calmly assess their place in the poignant irrevocable path they have chosen.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="708" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-11/awake-ss.jpg?itok=WfNsfkgW" title="awake-ss.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Awake, Oil on canvas overlaid with video projection, 120 x 72 inches, 2018</figcaption></figure><p>The home is a center of rituals and sacraments in our relationships, a place of safety and of solitude that replicates in our subconscious our origins in the mother’s womb.  It is the center of belonging, which provides shelter and containment. It can be a place for nurturing the self, a place of avoidance, and also a place of deprivation of life in the world. The human psyche is often thought of as a house with various levels that advance through time.  Here the house symbolizes both a sanctuary and a prison.</p> <blockquote> <p>"Home is the goal of epic odysseys, spiritual quests and psychic transformation." (P. 556, <em>The Book of Symbols</em>, ARAS, Taschen, 2010.)</p> </blockquote> <p>A window is often referred to as the "eye"of a home which frames images with a sense of suffused psychic potency. It is a translucent threshold where elemental outside and inside forces merge to create conditions conducive to the psychological expansion that leads to self-knowledge. (P. 564, <em>The Book of Symbols</em>.)</p> <p>"Blue Curtain" (oil painting on wood panel overlaid with video projection, 72 x 48 inches, 2017) presents the transparent, veiled back view of a nude standing woman as she faces a window, in a scene that mingles eroticism with psychic transfiguration. In contrast, the opaque black veil is linked to irreproachable morality.</p> <div class="video-embed-field-provider-youtube video-embed-field-responsive-video form-group"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZxWqbRw-FRg?autoplay=0&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> <p>In "My Sister's Picture," Farzandeh and Bahareh offer insight into their performance-based collaborative process as one twin confidently photographs herself while the other scrutinizes her mirror image, enabling the viewer to participate in the genesis of the multivalent process, as their conscious self-knowledge expands. The twins gradually grow to trust their power to control the sheer curtains, which function as two-pronged barriers that both protect them and prevent their exposure to the outside world. The mirror is a light-infused symbol of our ability to contemplate and reflect, as a vehicle for redemption. Mirrors embody the power of the unconscious to expose unknown potential wisdom.  Schopenhauer compared the mirror to human intelligence (p. 592, <em>The Book of Symbols</em>, ARAS, Taschen, 2010).</p> <p>The artists draw on women's societal issues, psychology, filmmaking and art history to create amalgams of painting and video that examine their liberating interior odyssey symbolized by the interior settings of their artwork. This autobiographical exhibition relates in eloquent uncanny images and postures the conflicts that surface when one examines internalized societal false certainties, to uncover one's potential. These realizations may precipitate new beginnings based on previously inconceivable personal truths.</p> <p>This daring, inventive exhibition mixes video with painting in an imaginative effective process that enhances and invigorates both genres. It is a perfect bridge that produces a new means of honing and articulating visual art. <em>Reincarnation</em> is an unusually sensitive glimpse into the private domain of twin sisters who miraculously support and encourage one another in their liberating disclosures. In the context of courageous performance-based imagery they present their insightful journey of awareness by exposing their internal conflicts. The sisters have explored their similarities, but they haven't yet delved into what makes each one distinctive. They cooperate on the same art-piece and video in an unparalleled model of two minds working in parallel harmony. In this unique balance of performance, video and figurative painting, Farandeh and Bahareh have made a persuasive narrative of young women coming into their own in the context of their identity as artists and as Iranian women. The show provides an engaging example of an ingenious new, invigorated hybrid genre. It is rare, especially for sisters, to maintain a practice that excludes the strife and competition that dominate the outer world of art and the milieu beyond.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3789&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="3NMfeweAqlO8U-H4lQUsR9jINtGo2hIB94rSlYqOODk"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 05 Nov 2018 21:15:11 +0000 Mary Hrbacek 3789 at http://culturecatch.com Men In Rooms http://culturecatch.com/node/3787 <span>Men In Rooms</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/529" lang="" about="/user/529" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Bradley Rubinstein</a></span> <span>October 29, 2018 - 16:12</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/510" hreflang="en">painters</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/281" hreflang="en">art</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/carousel-001_0.jpg?itok=yg7KBXyL" width="1200" height="636" alt="Thumbnail" title="carousel-001.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Bruce Nauman: <i>Disappearing Acts</i></p> <p>MoMA PS1</p> <p>Through February 25 2019</p> <blockquote> <p><i>"I talk, you listen."</i> Bruce Nauman</p> </blockquote> <p> </p> <blockquote> <p><i>"Sculpture is the art of intelligence."</i> Pablo Picasso</p> </blockquote> <p> </p> <blockquote> <p><i>"No sense makes sense." </i>Charles Manson</p> </blockquote> <p> </p> <p>Dear Dusty. Sorry for the delay. I got your letter and the m/s last Tuesday. My landlord Lana -- you met her once, I think --  found me this morning passed out in the hallway, hungover. It's ok. She's seen me worse off. With young girls, or 1 time naked after mistakenly picking up a cupcake I swear to god looked like Hedy Lamarr with an afro. She turned out not to be so nice when I couldn't pay her. One time these 2 German girls came from Hamburg to visit me. I tried to fuck both of them, finally settled on the older one 19 while the other one went to the Brehmer &amp; Cross to wait. I gave her a real pounding, 1 or 2 inches at a time at first, I kept punching at the tunnel, good hard strokes. "Oh god Frank! It's so BIG Frank! HOLY SHIT IT’S PURPLE, FRANK!" she went on and on. Maybe it was all the beer, but I gave her 3 or 4 good long strokes then gave up and ate her out. The girls stayed 4 days and nights until I got bored and then it was 4 or 5 cans of beer and a couple little cans of vodka mix with rum because we were out of vodka just to get them out.</p> <p>I am going to go by the post office to mail you the new poems, but I want to stop off at the Black Sparrow. There is a new bartender there called Bruce [<i>First Hologram Series: Making Faces B</i>, 1968] who used to work days but now he just does nights. He says the tips are better at night and he is trying to save up money so he can move out full time to work on a dude ranch. [<i>Setting a Good Corner (Allegory and Metaphor)</i>, 1999] Kid is ok. He is a composer. He doesn't know shit about Mahler, but he brought in a tape recorder that he had a tape on of a symphony he composed. Modern shit, but the title of it was <i>DEAD DAD</i> so who the fuck am I to say. It wasn't half bad.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/makemethinkme-1.jpg?itok=y_SCjn1i" width="1200" height="1776" alt="Thumbnail" title="makemethinkme-1.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>That screenplay shit I told you about was just some "artist" wanting to do a student film. I told him to fuck off because a) he didn't seem to have any money, b) he wants to do <i>Boners</i> when I had specifically told him it had to be one of the longer shorts from <i>Mother's Pussy</i> and c) I think he just wants to fuck me.</p> <p>You know that feeling you get when you feel like you've forgotten something like your room key or that something is missing like your soul? Bruce understands that. That is something. Most artists never understand that. The absent, the void, the feeling of nonexistence. Bruce gives form to these things. [<i>Seven Wax Templates of the Left Half of My Body Spread over 12 Feet</i>, 1967] Things that are seen, holes the size of a body part, the space under a chair, a beautiful woman vanishing around a corner. In the nocturnal life of the studio, the empty bathtub where you were 2 minutes before. He grapples with the anxiety of the psychological world. Like Victor Hugo wrote on emptiness and inhabiting. Ouasimodo's cathedral was "egg, nest, house, country and universe …one might almost say that he had espoused its form the way a snail does the form of its shell. It was his home, his hole, his envelope. He adhered to it like a turtle to its carapace. This rugged cathedral was his armor." There was a big shoot-out last night outside the Sparrow. A real Punch and Judy show. [<i>Crime and Punishment (Punch and Judy), </i>1985] I didn't actually see it. I heard some shots and figured it was some SLA shit or Manson, or the IRA. Bruce didn't want to go out. He said, “It will be on tv in 10 minutes anyway." Bruce likes his violence second hand I guess. It's the city does this. Turns real people into animals. [<i>Leaping Foxes</i>, 2018] Concrete walls. Endless streets. All the protest signs in Zapruder Park. Fuck You. NO. Get out of my head. All you need is love. [<i>Human Nature/Life Death/Knows Doesn’t Know,</i> 1983] I had left the racetrack a loser, after the 9th, so clearly my luck wouldn't be improved walking into a riot. Bruce is right. It will all be on tv in 10 minutes.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/neon-art-by-bruce-nauman-artists-i-lobo-you3.jpg?itok=9YSxNs6P" width="1200" height="1599" alt="Thumbnail" title="neon-art-by-bruce-nauman-artists-i-lobo-you3.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p>Tried to look for some symphony music on the radio and passed by the news. It didn't mention the shootings today. I guess it's not a real story unless somebody dies. There are always so many angles on these things, whoever knows what the truth is. Bruce says, "the real artist reveals mystical truths" or some shit. Poetry. Well, I think maybe the tv brought it into the streets. Maybe it's an overdose of Marx. Sometimes I wonder what Hem would have done, then I laugh because we know what Hem would have done. Ha Ha. Oh, lovely Mahler.</p> <p>I am lucky to have you as a friend. I am sending you some new poems. I will have the new novel <i>Blowjobs</i> soon. January if I don't get murdered, for better or for worse. We must first look for centers of simplicity in our lives, in our many rooms. [<i>Double Steel Cage Piece,</i> 1974] Bruce said the other night "we are just in different rooms at different times, with different people." He knows death and waste and glory and some of the rent paid and courage. And moving toward the sun. He said: "frustration is something that gets you into the studio and gets you to work through it. It's not evident in anything that is finished. Knowing when it’s enough and you can leave it alone." I hope I remember these things. The cat with a bird in its mouth, the rifle sticking out of the window, the screaming clowns, the rats at night scurryingly oblivious. Walking into the water and becoming one with the sea.</p> <p>Mr. Rubenstein is a painter and smart culture aficionado, he is the author of <em>The Black Album: Writings in Art and Culture. Order it now at <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Black-Album-Writings-Art-Culture/dp/173222191X" target="_blank">Amazon</a>.</em><br />  </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3787&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="pkSWS5ho3H8NyAKXx3YlyZRla9BUTXCE9Mxkgi2iXM8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 29 Oct 2018 20:12:14 +0000 Bradley Rubinstein 3787 at http://culturecatch.com Pivotal Art Time http://culturecatch.com/node/3786 <span>Pivotal Art Time</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/349" lang="" about="/user/349" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dom Lombardi</a></span> <span>October 29, 2018 - 10:14</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/605" hreflang="en">art exhibit</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/115" hreflang="en">gallery show</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="806" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/majestic-water.jpg?itok=Au2KfBqR" title="majestic-water.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="806" /></article><figcaption>Sam Bartman, Majestic Waters (2001), mixed media on reflective plastic sheet, 17 x 17 inches</figcaption></figure><p>Three New Exhibitions at the <a href="https://www.hammondmuseum.org/" target="_blank">Hammond Museum</a> &amp; Japanese Stroll Garden</p> <p>With three exhibitions opening at the Hammond Museum, the big surprise is the work of Sam Bartman. Born in Brooklyn, NY in 1922, Bartman has spent the last 60 years of his life creating stirring paintings that combine some of the most the incompatible materials. In experimenting with what he calls his “special sauce”, Bartman has somehow tamed a mix of resins, varnishes, motor oil, glitter and automotive paints with oils and acrylics that results in everything from endlessly crackling surfaces and minute swirling storms of color. There are even the occasional brushstrokes that push the variously drying materials around leaving fossil like impressions of battered brush hairs sorrowfully spent in a furious wake of swished paint.</p> <p>Bartman is an outsider. His unconventional and periled approach to previously incompatible materials could only have come from a place of pure, unrestrained, fearless experimentation common to this type. He scrapes, he pours, he projects his insights and instincts directly onto strange repurposed square surfaces comprised of millions of tiny glass beads attached to a sour yellow ground. In some instances, it all comes together looking somewhere between the more vigorous works of Vincent van Gogh and the paintings by Max Ernst that feature his decalcomania or grattage technique.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/van-gogh-bartman.jpg?itok=7NtyVRI3" width="1200" height="1172" alt="Thumbnail" title="van-gogh-bartman.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><em>Image above:</em> (top) Vincent van Gogh, <i>Wheatfield with Crows</i> (1890) Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Wikipedia image; (bottom left) Sam Bartman, <i>Untitled</i> (2008), mixed media on reflective plastic sheet, 17 x 17 inches; (bottom right) Sam Bartman, <i>First Attempt</i> (1998), mixed media on reflective plastic sheet, 17 x 17 inches</p> <p>In reference to, or perhaps in his channeling of Van Gogh, you can see in <i>Untitled</i> (2008) and in <i>First Attempt</i> (1998) a similar heaviness and deliberateness in the paint application between the two artists. Comparatively, where Van Gogh is painting highly expressive and intensely colorful works en plein air; Bartman paints at night, indoors, using artificial light and in the solitude of his basement on a commandeered Ping-Pong table. Surrounded by the wafting waves of fumes and off gases his techniques produce, Bartman pulls from his daily observations filtered through a subconscious that allows all and any twist or turn.</p> <p>With Ernst, when you look at the techniques he used to create <i>Painting For Young People</i> (1943) you see decalcomania, a transfer of paint onto the surface on the large panel in the upper portion of this multi-segmented work; and grattage, a scraping away of material in the large panel on the bottom. You see similar look in <i>A New World</i> (n.d.) by Bartman, only in Bartman’s painting the resulting appearance of the top, where you have the organic swirls of color, is more the result of a chemical reaction relative to the incompatibility of materials used, than it is the chance blending of a somewhat blind transference of medium. And with both artists, there is the addition of facial features to personify the humanoid forms that inhabit these paintings giving some the impression of a lost soul in a threatening space.</p> <article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/ernst-bartman.jpg?itok=rilKyAmf" width="768" height="1384" alt="Thumbnail" title="ernst-bartman.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><em>Image above:</em> (top) Max Ernst, <i>Painting For Young People</i> (1943); (bottom) Sam Bartman, <i>A New World</i> (n.d.), mixed media on reflective plastic sheet, 17 x 17 inches</p> <p>Overall, and despite the similarities to artists that have come before him, the art of Bartman is striking and powerful and worth much more attention than he has garnered to date.</p> <p>In the same room of the Bartman paintings you will find the mood-laden paintings of Laura Von Rosk. Her landscapes are also rather intimately sized, as her intended visions look like they might reside in a cleverly crafted storybook, albethey dark at times, as her representations often beg narration.</p> <p>In the front room as you first enter the museum is a circular space with six built-in vitrines. Each one of the display cases hold large sheets of paper filled with delicately drawn, subtly abstracted shapes that are clearly informed by nature. In each instance, Randy Orzano offers us his collaboration between himself and the bees he keeps. By placing his completed drawings flat or folded into the very beehives he tends to, Orzano gathers the residue of an orderly and purposeful social network. As the busy inhabitants eat away at and add wax and propolis to the hive and the bordering artist’s paper a new curious design takes shape that enhances the works on paper, while maintaining an indelible link between the artist and the industrious engineers.</p> <p>Featured in the main room of the museum is an exhibition titled <i>Arirang Grace -- Between Dislocation and Settlement</i>, an exhibition curated by Iris Moon. Overall, the exhibition is a bit of a disappointment. In some instances the art is too large for the spaces they occupy; there is too much work and in the end not enough cohesion in the curatorial thread. All of the 17 artists in this exhibition are Korean and all are quite different in their use of materials and intended message. The loan North Korean Artist is easy to spot. Kun Hak Ri’s <i>Rope Skipping</i> (2003) shows a group of five children jumping with joy above a flower laden rope painted in a style that is both ideal in its representations and over-the-top in its positivity.</p> <p>There are a few instances where the art is able to breathe. Bong Jung Kim, one accomplished artist whose work I have come to know quite well, offers a new series of figurative works constructed of fragments common to our fast-paced, ‘everything-is-quickly-outdated’ conditioning. In his longtime quest to project his addictions and obsessions, Kim bares his soul each and every time he makes his art. Additionally, he is showing us that the vast and endless amount of materials that is largely and quickly considered to be junk, can be seen as a treasure trove of inspiration in the hands of an artist.</p> <p>​Myong Hi Kim's <i>Tea </i>(2004) is a curious piece whereby the artist uses the recently abandoned school chalkboards she finds in rural South Korean towns that have lost students to the migration to cities. Working with oil pastels and chalk, and with the addition of a video of the foliage of the countryside, Kim art speaks volumes about the disappearing traditions of a simpler, more peaceful and rewarding life that is being erased by the promises of the modern era. Conversely, her husband Tchah Sup Kim opens and splays his paper coffee cup every morning in a shape reminiscent of a traditional folding fan and proceeds to paint or draw on them in various ways and in styles suggestive of his inspirations and interests. Both artists blend era and tradition in fascinating ways and both present the ages old discussion that pits the perils of progress against the tried and true qualities of life.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="568" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/myong-hi-kim-tea.jpg?itok=A6vUNnBX" title="myong-hi-kim-tea.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1080" /></article><figcaption>Myong Hi Kim, Tea, 2004 Oil Pastel on Chalkboard with incorporated video, 47 ¼ x 90 ½ inches</figcaption></figure><p>Yoo Ah Park suggests, using bold color, carefully rendered forms and veiled faces, a fading of individual needs and nuances into a world more controlled by outside influence. Photographer Jun Ahn brings the collateral damage to the next level by places herself in anxiety provoking situations against a backdrop turned cold by the insatiability that progress and prosperity inevitably brings.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="480" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/jun-ahn-self-portrait.jpg?itok=8P1FPPYe" title="jun-ahn-self-portrait.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="640" /></article><figcaption>Jun Ahn, Self – Portrait, 2008, HDR Ultra Chrome Archival Pigment Print 40 x 30 inches</figcaption></figure><p>Other artists in the exhibition are Young Mi Kim, Hong Hee Kim, Joon Kim, Kun Hak Ri, Nam June Paik, Sam Sik Bae, Hyong Nam Ahn, Kate Oh, Jinwon Chang, Gye Kun Chio, Kyu Nam Han and Buhm Hong.</p> <p>All three exhibitions end November 10<sup>th</sup>. There are also sculptures in various media displayed throughout the grounds of the museum by a number of artists including Joy Brown, Mimi Czajka Graminski and Tom Holmes. Thanks to the hard work of individuals like Curator Bibiana Huang Matheis, Director Lorraine Laken and a dedicated board led by its President Evelyn Tapani-Rosenthal, the Hammond Museum &amp; Japanese Stroll Garden has maintained its pivotal position in the arts and culture of Westchester County for over 60 years.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3786&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="ZMT1hwUqBl_4gUlEqfep7iWykR58T_laJOt-91U_iDI"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 29 Oct 2018 14:14:47 +0000 Dom Lombardi 3786 at http://culturecatch.com What Is Nothingness? http://culturecatch.com/node/3780 <span>What Is Nothingness?</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/530" lang="" about="/user/530" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Elizabeth Stevens</a></span> <span>October 17, 2018 - 10:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/115" hreflang="en">gallery show</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/583" hreflang="en">Allen Hansen</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/584" hreflang="en">Lichtundfire</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><article class="embedded-entity"><img src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/allen-hansen-paintings.jpg?itok=uyi2tt7U" width="1080" height="698" alt="Thumbnail" title="allen-hansen-paintings.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /></article><p><em>Allen Hansen: The Atmosphere of Nothingness / Or 0 </em></p> <p><a href="http://www.lichtundfire.com" target="_blank"><b>LICHTUNDFIRE</b></a>, 175 Rivington Street, New York, NY</p> <blockquote> <p>"You’re going to have two jobs for the rest of your life -- can you accept that?"</p> </blockquote> <p>This is what someone said to me before I headed off for the East Coast from Kentucky back in 1987, to paint and study art history. So, the question is -- how do we move forward and remain passionate in an environment that has now become so economically driven that the forest and the trees seem to have been left in the rear view?</p> <p><a href="https://sites.google.com/site/allenanthonyhansen/home" target="_blank">Allen Hansen</a> has remained true to his calling as a visual artist, a painter's painter. What most don’t seem to grasp in today’s breakneck non-organic art world is that one of those "jobs" is unconventional -- it's faith and practice.</p> <p>Hansen's painting is a dark, warm sublime. He has moved forward from landscape into his own vast horizon, developing lush abstractions that play on a cool palette that’s as warm as everyone's radiators kicking in this month. His balance is near-to perfect, absolutely his own, and the result of years of development, focus, and dedication.</p> <p>Allen arrived in New York in 1979 from California, and after getting a "do everything" internship with Mary Boone (the second job), he had found his Oz and never looked back. This was a completely different time for the contemporary art world in New York, romantic and community driven. I spoke with Allen about this recently, and he considers himself fortunate to have been active during that time; and it was this experience that steered him to the business of professional logistics and art moving for the past thirty years, landing him today at SRI Fine Art Services as Head of Client Relations.</p> <p>This is another reason I wanted to contribute commentary on his most recent series of seven works from 2018 that were on view at Lichtundfire last month. When I am not researching or writing about the art world, I too work within it, in my case at Gander &amp; White. These positions are demanding, and from my own experience, one can only survive them by having a certain brand of conviction, and an understanding of the artists, collectors, and galleries that manage to exist within its unique ecosystem.  The fact that he was able to produce these artworks in the midst of helping others navigate the complexities of today’s commercial art culture is a highly impressive prospect.</p> <p>Allen mentioned to me that after many years of life lessons, he now balances his painting life and his daily work from a house in Asbury Park, New Jersey that he and his wife bought fifteen years ago, and where they keep his studio and their sanity. Many come to New York to practice art every day, but very few manage to stick it out like Allen has for forty years.  To see his latest work is a testament to something not so easily and not so often well done. Good Show!</p> <p><a href="https://sites.google.com/site/allenanthonyhansen/home" target="_blank">Allen Hansen</a> is also represented in New York by Carter Burden Gallery.  We will look for more work coming in 2019.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3780&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="jD0tYYRHB0vNlZ0hN1NX0PpK3dn9u2lhRZkL_PGUBWc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 17 Oct 2018 14:01:42 +0000 Elizabeth Stevens 3780 at http://culturecatch.com Vanity Fair IX: Beth Kirby+Bradley Rubenstein http://culturecatch.com/node/3777 <span>Vanity Fair IX: Beth Kirby+Bradley Rubenstein</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/dusty-wright" lang="" about="/users/dusty-wright" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Dusty Wright</a></span> <span>October 12, 2018 - 10:57</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/510" hreflang="en">painters</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="832" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/kirby_untitled_1-2018.jpg?itok=ecGVYymP" title="kirby_untitled_1-2018.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1080" /></article><figcaption>Beth Kirby Untitled No. 1 2018</figcaption></figure><p>Beth Kirby is an artist based in Bristol, UK. Her work discusses the human form, female sexuality, and censorship. Via the mediums of drawing, collage, and painting, her work frequently explores the notion of censorship of women and the ownership of their sexuality in the age of social media and fourth-wave feminism.</p> <p>The visual language of porn censorship, pattern, found collage, and other varied modes of disguise and omission are utilized to ask questions of the viewer: What do visual and personal censorship mean? How powerful is suggestion? How can women retain their autonomy, especially when it comes to the issue of sexuality?</p> <p>Humor is just as important to and prevalent in her work as the vastly complex issues she raises, intended to make the discussion more approachable to all.</p> <p><b>What is your idea of perfect happiness?</b> To be carefree and to possess unwavering belief in myself.</p> <p><b>What is your greatest fear?</b> Rape.</p> <p><b>Which historical figure do you most identify with? </b>I have no idea! I've never been one for role models and idols.</p> <p><b>What is the trait you most deplore in yourself? </b>The absolute inability to go easy on myself.</p> <p><b>What is the trait you most deplore in others?</b> Actually there's a few, but I suppose being unaware of others.</p> <p><b>What is your greatest extravagance?</b> I have grown to really dislike displays of excess in terms of possessions, but good food and drink is the greatest burden on my bank balance.</p> <p><b>What do you consider the most overrated virtue?</b> I can't bear the idea that being "prim" is somehow a virtue. I want to hear people swear, get angry, enjoy the base things that have somehow become "improper."</p> <p><b>On what occasion do you lie?</b> On many! Lying (or at least withholding the full truth) is the lube of adult life.</p> <p><b>What do you dislike most about your appearance?</b> I wouldn't say anything strongly, I more dislike that I cannot just accept it sometimes.</p> <p><b>What is your greatest regret?</b> I don't think I have any true regrets, just changes. </p> <p><b>What or who is the greatest love of your life?</b> The greatest love story of my life is my relationship with making art -- we've laughed, we've cried, we've broken up, we've kissed in the rain. But obviously I have to mention my boyfriend too, right?!</p> <p><b>Which talent would you most like to have?</b> I'd just really fucking love to be able to do a backflip.</p> <p><b>What is your current state of mind?</b> I've felt quite stuck for a while. I long for change, and they are slow and arduous, and I'm impatient. I feel I'm behind the stall gate of the rest of my life, chomping at the bit.</p> <p><b>What do you consider your greatest achievement?</b> Falling back in love with making art.</p> <p><b>What is your most treasured possession?</b> Probably a chain necklace that was my grandmother's.</p> <p><b>What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?</b> I have seasonal depression, so: October.</p> <p><b>Where would you like to live?</b> I don't really have an answer. I don’t really mind so much as long as I'm with people I love.</p> <p><b>What is your favorite occupation?</b> I haven't found it yet...</p> <p><b>What is your most marked characteristic? </b>I am almost over-aware of people, their temperaments, moods, and personalities (including my own), and this always gets commented on.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1249" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-10/kirby_untitled_2-2018.jpg?itok=gzUeRO6C" title="kirby_untitled_2-2018.jpg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1080" /></article><figcaption>Beth Kirby Untitled No. 2 2018</figcaption></figure><p><b>What is the quality you most like in a man?</b> Thoughtfulness and the things that this creates, and humor.</p> <p><b>What is the quality you most like in a woman?</b> As above.</p> <p><b>What do you most value in your friends?</b> Their sense of humor and how accepting we are of each other’s increasingly different lives.</p> <p><b>What is it that you most dislike?</b> Not coming through on plans.</p> <p><b>How would you like to die?</b> Happy and tired enough to let it go.</p> <p><b>What is your motto?</b> If you don’t ask, you don't get.</p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3777&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="Cq5j3vjpzOOm5w4ZppbZGMuBLiEGSFjfTq88eKbRDqQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 12 Oct 2018 14:57:36 +0000 Dusty Wright 3777 at http://culturecatch.com Pop Goes The Painting http://culturecatch.com/node/3772 <span>Pop Goes The Painting</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/millree-hughes" lang="" about="/users/millree-hughes" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Millree Hughes</a></span> <span>September 28, 2018 - 09:53</span> <div class="field field--name-field-topics field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Topics</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/art" hreflang="en">Art Review</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline"> <div class="field--label">Tags</div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/203" hreflang="en">painter</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em>John Wesley: Together And Alone</em> </p> <p>Fredericks &amp; Freiser Gallery, NYC</p> <p>September 6th - October 20th</p> <p>There’s not much here. Powder blue, powder pink, skin colour and a thin self-conscious, spindly black line.</p> <p>It defies you. Is it meant to be inaccurate? Not well done?</p> <p>It's as if Egon Schiele suddenly wanted to be Al Capp but something went wrong at the point of realization. The line drifting, like wet Letraset figures on warped showcard.</p> <p>John Wesley has a new show at Fredericks &amp; Freiser Gallery in New York City. The men are not attractive, the women are. Gangly 20s’ers and older more fully formed. An ugly bald man appears a few times, as in this one, peering curiously. </p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1051" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-09/chocolage-major.jpeg?itok=lQs0ZSPS" title="chocolage-major.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="1200" /></article><figcaption>Van Nuys Honeymoon 2002 </figcaption></figure><p>It's as if the whole painting has been made so that the composition can pivot on his nostril.</p> <p>A grumpy middle aged man is in the foreground in dinge brown. A young girl looks down at her fingers in dismay (perhaps). The background is sky blue, the grass, sap green. Youth! The outline of the shoulders of the man can be read as her open legs, his collar implying open crotch panties. An intimate act and a dissatisfied figure walking away, in one image.</p> <figure role="group" class="embedded-entity"><article><img alt="Thumbnail" class="img-responsive" height="1094" src="/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2018/2018-09/van-nuys-honeymoon.jpeg?itok=c8AofQI7" title="van-nuys-honeymoon.jpeg" typeof="foaf:Image" width="957" /></article><figcaption>Chocolate Major 2002, Acrylic on canvas 63 × 53 × 2 in; 160 × 134.6 × 5.1 cm</figcaption></figure><p>The artist finds a photograph...</p> <blockquote> <p>"...he traces it, makes a graph, and uses algebra to enlarge it in several stages until the drawing is ready to be transferred onto the canvas. During what would seem, so described, to be a mechanical process, strange and irrational and funny things go on." Hannah Green*</p> </blockquote> <p>(Wesley's wife until her death in 1996.)</p> <p>The glad handing of the Pop artists is not attempted. He's not here to impress you. The mood is one of inexplainable phenomenon and lost connections. </p> <p>At the age of six Jack Wesley saw his father lying out in the bathroom, he had died of a stroke. Jack went to live in an orphanage -- The McKinley Home for Boys -- and stayed there until his mother married again. </p> <p>But "reading" a John Wesley will only take you so far. It's better to look, or "listen." They work like an absurd joke.</p> <p>"My granny was recently beaten to death by my grandad. </p> <p>Not as in, with a stick -- he just died first."</p> <p>Alex Horne</p> <p>These paintings remind me of another great American artwork -- David Lynch's <em>Lost Highways</em>. I saw it, alone, away from home in a hotel room. I realized halfway through that I had to stop trying to follow it and just let the director lead me. </p> <p>"I'm not a real painter," Jack says.</p> <blockquote> <p>"I'm getting away with murder. I don’t really know how. I can only do what I do."*</p> </blockquote> <p>But with Wesley's work you can’t let it be open to individual interpretation either. He has taken you this far into a zone of ambiguity. You’ve entered the envelope, knowing full well that there is no there, there.</p> <p>I think that's hard for Americans to do. It's a country where people speak a lot of different languages. They don't like to be left behind in the workplace just because they don't understand what's going on. Living here as a Welshman I have found that ludicrous endings and point-less stories don’t go down well.</p> <p>That's why there are so few elements in his paintings. He makes it simple. Gives you space. It makes it easier for him to lead your gaze where he wants to take it.</p> <p>* <a href="https://chinati.org/programs/hannah-green-a-journal-in-praise-of-the-art-of-john-wesley/"><em>A Journal in Praise of the Art of John Wesley</em></a> written by Hannah Green 1974</p> <p> </p> </div> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=3772&amp;2=comment_node_story&amp;3=comment_node_story" token="06fLFSZE4m16s5l2k_vu7AS7mTtNiDLF-J0NN17DP9U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 28 Sep 2018 13:53:36 +0000 Millree Hughes 3772 at http://culturecatch.com