Film Review

By Grace Alone: Warhol Superstar ULTRA VIOLET, 1936-2014

Very few of Andy Warhol's anointed "superstars" managed a long shelf-life. They simply were too wild, too beautiful, and too damned. There were the poor little rich girl Edie Sedgwick, the transgender icon Candy Darling, and the husky, glacial, heroin-swamped charm of Nico. All gone, along with a cavalcade of others; too soon and in the 20th century. Ultra Violet survived into this one, and originally arrived as a somebody already in the anybody everybody world of The Factory.

Interstellar Overdrive

Few are the low budget sci-fi films that inspire deep thinking, but writer/director James Ward Byrkit's metaphysical psychological sci-fi thriller Coherence is one of the exceptions. Certainly this reviewer was reminded of The Twilight Zones' ability to introduce a simple concept that would extrapolate when the human element was left to ponder and react to a dilemma. There are clever explanations, like Siberia's Tunguska Event of 1908, to try explain the reality of the situation, but, like life, there is always more than meets the eye.

2nd Annual Israel Film Center Festival: Patrick Stewart, Cranes, and Surviving the Holocaust

Thanks to Manhattan’s favorite cultural philanthropist, Carole Zabar  -- you know her rugelach -- a second year of the Israel Film Center Festival will be unspooling at various venues around the city, but mainly at The Jewish Community Center on the Upper West Side from June 12th through June 19th.

Something Must Break: Hedwig Without Music

"It is an awful thing to be betrayed by your body, David Levithan asserts in his novel Every Day." And it's lonely, because you feel you can't talk about it. You feel it's something between you and the body. You feel it's a battle you will never win . . . and yet you fight it day after day, and it wears you down. Even if you try to ignore it, the energy it takes to ignore it will exhaust you." 

A Naked Face in The Crowded City

(Ed. note - CC writer Ian Alterman writes about two of his favorite film classics.)

The Naked City

Two years after making The Naked City, director Jules Dassin would find himself on the Hollywood Blacklist, and move to Europe, never to return to the U.S.  His first film made in Europe, Rififi (1955), would become his most influential, beloved and, arguably, greatest film.  And there are already signs of the naturalist style used in Rififi in The Naked City, though the former is a classic (maybe the classic) heist film, while the latter is a film noir police procedural, complete with narration (which ends the movie with the famous line: “There are eight million stories in the naked city.  This is one of them.”)