Theater Review

The Greatest Show On Earth...

Carnival Kids
Directed by Stephen Brackett
Lesser America at TBG Theatre
312 West 36th Street, NYC
June 5th - 28th, 2014

Carnival Kids, by Lucas Kavner, offers a compelling snapshot of five people whose lives intersect via one New York City apartment. Mark (Jake Choi) is a law student whose father, Dale (Randall Newsome), formerly a keyboardist in a touring rock band, moves from Texas to stay with his son while he ostensibly looks for work; Dale’s entanglements with Mark’s roommate, Eckland (Max Jenkins), and a young woman, Kalina (Danelle Eliav), soon disturb the sediment of the family history. Mark’s past makes a second reappearance when he reconnects with Marisa (Laura Ramadei), who had a crush on him in high school. How Mark attempts to navigate these relationships drives this funny and affecting new play. Read more »

The Killer

The Killer
Directed by Darko Tresnjak
Theater for a New Audience at Polonsky Shakespeare Center
262 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, NY
May 17 - June 29, 2014

Theater for a New Audience closes its inaugural season in its new home at the Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn with an outstanding production of Eugène Ionesco’s 1957 dark comedy, The Killer. Presented here in a new translation by Michael Feingold, The Killer follows Berenger, Ionesco’s multi-play Everyman, from his discovery of a utopian “radiant city,” a place that returns to him a long-lost feeling of being truly alive, through the consequences of his further discovery that his utopia boasts a resident murderer.  When a young woman named Dennie, with whom Berenger immediately falls in love, makes herself vulnerable to the murderer by leaving the employ of the city, Berenger’s quest for justice leads him into encounters with a sickly friend who may or may not be involved, attendees at a political rally, and the police who violently suppress them, culminating in an extended face-to-shadowy-face with the titular antagonist. Read more »

Life Is Just One Delicious...

Cabaret has always been a groundbreaking musical, dating back to Harold Prince’s original production in 1966.  When Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall’s production opened at Studio 54 in 1998, it built upon what Prince started and pushed the limits even further, creating a much raunchier, seedier, darker, and more dangerous trip to the cabaret.  Mendes and Marshall have once again brought their Cabaret back to Studio 54, and it remains a brilliant production of a great musical, one that manages to be hugely entertaining, funny, charming, and moving, while at the same time threatening in its depiction of the growing storm created by the rise of the Nazis in Berlin in 1930.  Dominated once again by the exceptional performance of Alan Cumming as the Emcee, Cabaret is a welcomed addition to any Broadway season, and it was great to have the chance to revisit this bold production. Read more »

The Contender!

Rocky
Winter Garden Theatre, NYC

Turning successful motion pictures into Broadway musicals has become the norm in recent years.  Whether the iconic 1976 Sylvester Stallone film, Rocky, was a movie that cried out for a musical adaptation is open to question.  But, Rocky has arrived on Broadway and, somewhat like its title character, the musical has a bit of a bumpy road but is triumphant in the end.  Rocky, of course, tells the story of the small time, well meaning Philadelphia boxer, Rocky Balboa, his romance with meek girl friend Adrian, and his improbable chance to fight for the heavyweight championship. Read more »

Not The Busch Leagues!

The Tribute Artist
 by Charles Busch

Directed by Carl Andress
59E59 Theaters, NYC
Through March 29, 2014

 
Towards the end of this uproarious farce by veteran playwright and actor Charles Busch, Mr. Busch--as Jimmy Nichols, a long-in-the-tooth “female impressionist tribute artist” (a/k/a unemployed drag performer)--delivers a line that in any other play, comedy or otherwise, would befuddle the audience due to its complete nonsense. Proclaimed in tones of voice that would, in an era long gone by, indicate the pronouncement of a grand life-transforming revelation, Jimmy declares “The more honest you are, the more people believe you.” Without a doubt, only Charles Busch could make such an utterance not only appear reasonable, but in the process bring the house down shrieking with laughter.

Caryl Churchill's Love and Information: a 10 bullet-points review

1.) Picture a stage converted into a white cube where multiple brief scenes occur: the theatrically appropriate physical form to capture a digital world; Read more »

I Feel The Earth Move, Almost

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical
Stephen Sondheim Theatre, NYC

Describing Beautiful by comparing it to Jersey Boys seems unfair. Jersey Boys, of course, is a long running smash hit musical, and holding any new musical to the high standard of a major hit is asking a lot. But, while watching Beautiful, it is difficult not to think of the new Carole King musical as Jersey Boys Lite. That does not mean Beautiful is lacking in assets -- it has a terrific performance by Jessie Mueller as King and is filled with great songs, written by King and Gerry Goffin, as well as some from the team of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil. The result is an entertaining musical, but one that does not rise to the dramatic or emotional heights desired in a great show. Read more »

So Much Time, So Much To Do

Much Ado About Nothing

Directed by Christian Amato
The Theater Project

Feb. 14 - March 1, 2014

The Players Theater, NY

It may be winter in Manhattan, but it looks like a long hot summer for Beatrice, Benedict, Hero, Claudio, and the gang. So hot that feral cats are a’scampering over the hot tin roofs of Sicily’s port city of Messina, the setting for Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing. New York theater has been awash with Bardish productions everywhere. You can take your pick: traditional, modern dress, deconstructions, etc. Among so many offerings, I highly recommend you sashay on down to the li’l ol’ Players Theater and take a gander at their Much Ado About Nothing, rendered beautifully and hilariously in smoldering tempestuous Southern Style. Read more »

Pride of the Paycock

Juno and the Paycock
Directed by Charlotte Moore
The Irish Repertory Theatre 132 W. 22nd St., NYC
October 20-December 29, 2013

 

Watching “Captain” Jack Boyle’s pronouncement regarding Ireland’s civil strife -- “We’ve got nothin’ to do with these things, one way or t’other.  That’s the Government’s business, an’ let them do what we’re payin’ them for doin’” -- about 24 hours after a more than two-week government shutdown lent a little extra resonance to the Irish Repertory Theatre's production of Sean O’Casey’s Juno and the Paycock. The personal is always the political in O’Casey’s work, and Juno, part of his acclaimed Dublin Trilogy, skillfully interweaves the two as it follows the Boyle family’s fortunes’ (imagined) rise and fall in a 1922 Dublin tenement.  

Shades of brown dominate the peeling walls of James Noone’s set, which the cast fills admirably.  The titular characters, the goddess of the homefront (J. Smith-Cameron) and her strutting husband (Ciarán O’Reilly), turn in strong, nuanced performances, as does John Keating, coming off a similar and similarly well-executed role in the Irish Rep’s staging of The Weir, as the “daarlin’” Joxer Daly. Read more »

Fine Dining, New York Style

Separate Tables

Directed by Lin Snider and Justin Bennett

Out of the Box Theatre Company

West End Theater
, 263 West 86th Street, NYC
October 2-5, 2013 (Closed)

If you know of stage play more perfectly realized than Out of the Box Theatre's polished realization of Terence Rattigan's Separate Tables, let me know and I will rush to see it. However, that is unlikely, as co-directors Lin Snider and Justin Bennett have created a profound rarity indeed: a flawless production. Everything about this rendering of Rattigan's play, which opened in London in 1954 and on Broadway in 1956, is sheer perfection: every performance, the set, the costumes, the invisible effortless direction, the brief musical interludes -- all make for one of the most exhilarating evenings of theater I have ever experienced. It is unfortunate that such a fine production was limited to only six performances: a production of this outstanding caliber deserved a much longer run, or even transfer to a Broadway theater.

Terence Rattigan, most remembered for the film versions of his plays The Winslow Boy and The Browning Version, created Separate Tables as two interconnected one-act plays set in the early '50s at the shabby but genteel Beauregard Private Hotel in the English resort town of Bournemouth. In England, such hotels were often the residences for pensioners and others who found themselves in "reduced circumstances." Read more »

Last Train to Shakespeare

William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Directed by Christian Amato
The Theater Project
September 20-28, 2013 (Closed)
The Players Theater, MacDougal Street, NYC
Read more »

It's Alive!

Written by C.J. Thom
Directed by John Harlacher
The Connelly Theater, NYC
Through September 14, 2013

Franklin Stein is a horror story told in the tradition of Theater of the Absurd as practiced by Eugene Ionesco, the early work of Edward Albee, the plays of Samuel Beckett, and other international playwrights commencing in the late 1950s. Such plays are meditations on the absurdity of human existence, in which conventions of plot and characterization are distorted to convey, as one dictionary defined it, "the irrationally of existence and the isolation of humanity." Playwright C.J. Thom, with an exceptionally fine cast and artistic team, succeeds in presenting a powerful evening of theater which asks the question: What does it take to have heart against the backdrop of the pernicious corporatization of human life and interaction? Read more »

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
Directed by Gayle Stahlhuth
East Lynne Theater Company
Cape May, New Jersey
Through August 31, 2013

Washington Irving's venerable ghost story, first published in 1820, contains virtually no dialog, but abundant pondered ambiguities -- so it is up to the writer and director who is adapting the story in a performance medium to "dramatize" it. Many a writer has tried, in film, animation, stage, and musical versions. Playwright James Rana has taken up the challenge and provided the freshest of takes on The Legend of Sleepy Hollow in a delightful production mounted by East Lynne Theater Company in picturesque Cape May, New Jersey. Deftly directed by Gayle Stahlhuth, the company's artistic director, and with a talented cast of seasoned professionals, the hour and twenty minute presentation breezes by on the wings of disarming charm and dramatic authenticity. Read more »

Cornucopia of Characters

Darkling 
Presented at IRT, July 5 and 6, 2013

It is 1987 and Trinity, a gnarled-toothed thirteen-year old Goth Girl, will go through almost as many hilarious, overwrought, and absurd trials and adventures as Bell Poitrine in Patrick Dennis's mock-autobiography Little Me experienced in a lifetime -- but with one important difference: Trinity will do it all in one speedy hour. In Darkling, as written and performed by the consummate performance artist, Kim Katzberg, the Trinity character justly earns our sympathy and, through all the hilarity, ultimately grows up.

As demonstrated in her previous work, Penetrating the Space (reviewed herein when it was presented in repertory as part of the Cheerful Insanity show in 2011), Ms. Katzberg in Darkling again transforms herself into various characters. Such a magnitude of skill and theatrical dexterity prompts me to dub her the Meryl Streep of performance artists. In the course of Darkling, as Ms. Katzberg dons the personas of her sharply drawn characters, I found myself in double-think mode: simultaneously assuming another actor was in the show, and yet knowing that all were being embodied by Ms. Katzberg. As Trinity, Ms. Katzberg convincingly assumes the voice, diction, and body language of a suburban girl of thirteen who is not yet out of her "awkward stage." Read more »

One Child Born, One Star Born

One Child Born
Joe's Pub
July 6, 2013

It took me a while, but I finally got to see this one-woman cabaret tribute to the music and inspiration of legendary songstress Laura Nyro. Starring singer/pianist Kate Ferber, who co-wrote it with Louis Greenstein, it premiered in 2009, but at least one detail's changed since then: mention of Nyro's 2012 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has been incorporated into one of the character monologs. Read more »

Syndicate content